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341st Anniversary 



ANNUAL REPORT 



of the 



TOWN OFFICERS 




For the Year Ending December 31, 1991 



341st Anniversary 




ANNUAL REPORT 



of the 



TOWN OFFICERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1991 




THE 1991 ANNUAL TOWN REPORT IS DEDICATED TO 



CHARLES FULLER, JR., ESQUIRE 



Charles Fuller, Jr. has faithfully served Medfield 
as Town Counsel since 1966 and will retire in 1992. 
He has been an eloquent spokesman when he 
represented Medfield in court and, conversely, has 
been renowned for his perseverance as he kept the 
Town out of court. He is without peer in his 
knowledge of municipal law. Chuck earned the 
respect and appreciation of those with whom he 
served. He also served the Town in various 
volunteer capacities, including the Warrant 
Committee, and as a coach for the Medfield Little 
League. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports1991medf 



IN MEMORIUM 



RICHARD G. CONNORS 

Selectman 1964-1967 

Insurance Advisory Committee 1971-1975 

Regional Vocational School Study 1970-1971 

Finance Committee 1962-1964 

Memorial Day Committee 1965 

ALBERT A. CRUICKSHANK 

Memorial Day Committee 1971-1984 

WALTER M. PRANK 

Selectman 1967-1970 

School Committee - 1960-1965 

Park Commissioner 1961-1967 

Memorial Day Committee 1967 

Committee for Relocation and Widening of Route 109 

Central Business District Study Committee 

Development and Industrial Commission 

Financial Management Study Committee 

Committee to Develop 458 Main Street 

JOSEPH L. MARCIONETTE 

Selectman 1947-1964 

Selectman 1971-1975 

Park and Planning Board 1935-1945 

Finance Committee 1935-1939 

ROBERT E. MEANEY 

Special Police Officer 1952-1953 

THOMAS V. SWEENEY 

Civil Defense Officer 1965-1966 

WILLIAM F. ROGERS, JR. 

Park and Planning Board 1958-1961 

Planning Board 1961-1972 

Board of Appeals 1956-1958 

MICHAEL J. TAMMARO 

Housing Authority 1975-1979 

Sealer 1975-1977 

Growth Policy Commission 1976-77 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Population as of January 1, 1991 
Assessed Valuation 1991 
Tax Rate 



7/1/90 6/30/91 
7/1/91 6/30/92 



Area 

Mi les of Highway 



10,531 

$ 842,667,140.00 

$ 12.08 
$ 14.16 

14.43 Square Mi les 

70.78 



Elevation at Town Hall approximately 180 feet above mean sea level 
Medfield is in the following Voting Districts: 



4th District 

Representative to Congress 



2nd District 

Governor's Councillor 



1st Suffolk and Norfolk District 
State Senator 



13th Norfolk District 
Representative 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
United State Senators 



Barney Frank 
437 Cherry Street 
Newton, MA 02165 

Christopher A. Ianello, Jr. 

111 Perkins Street 

Boston, MA 

Christopher M. Lane 

55 West Street 

Medfield, MA 

Li da Hark ins 

House of Representatives 

State House - Room 257 

Boston, MA 02133 

Edward M. Kennedy 

J.F.K. Memorial Building 

Room 409 

Boston, MA 02203 

John Kerry 

Transportation Building 

10 Park Plaza - Suite 3220 

Boston, MA 02116 



Number of Registered Voters as of December 31, 1990: 



Democrats 

Republicans 

Unenrolled 



1145 
1261 
3861 



TOTAL 



6267 



1991 ELECTED TOWN OFFICERS 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Ralph C. Cope I and 



Nancy J. Preston 



MODERATOR 



TOWN CLERK 



SELECTMEN 



Term Expires 
1992 

1994 



Ann B. Thompson 

John F. Ganley 

Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 



1992 
1993 
1994 



ASSESSORS 



Clara E. Doub 
Carole A. Rossi 
William D. Walsh 



1992 
1993 
1994 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Gay W. D'Amaro 
William A. Hajjar 
Robert A. Kinsman 
F. Paul Quatromoni 
Teresa A. Fannin 



1992 
1992 
1993 
1993 
1994 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Richard M. Fitzpatrick 
James C. Baughman 
Michael D. West 
Maura Y. McNicholas 
Elizabeth J. Kozel 
David B. Allan 



1992 
1992 
1993 
1993 
1994 
1994 



PLANNING BOARD 

Stephen M. Nolan 1992 

Daniel W. Nye, appointed until next election 1992 

Margaret E. Bancroft 1994 

John K. Gagliani 1995 

Mark G. Cerel 1996 

PARK COMMISSIONERS 

John P. Monahan 1992 

Michael Medina, Jr., Resigned, 1991 1992 

Kathryn Violick-Boole 1993 

Margaret M. Maider 1993 

J. Gary Walsh 1993 

Leanne F. Vellchansky 1992 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Valerie A. Mariani, State Appointed September 10, 1996 

Diane E. Nightingale 1992 

Mary Ellen Thompson 1993 

Richard D. Jordan 1994 

L. Paul Galante, Jr. 1995 

APPOINTMENTS 

FIRE CHIEF 
William A. Kingsbury 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
Richard D. Hurley 

SERGEANTS 

Ronald E. Kerr John L. Mayer 

Raymond T. Wheeler John W. Wilhelmi 

POLICE OFFICERS 

Richard D. Bishop Stephen H. Grover 

Robert W. Brady Robert G. Hudson 

Raymond M. Burton Thomas P. McNiff 

Patrick J. Caulfield Robert E. Naughton 

Dana P. Friend Kevin W. Robinson 
Shawn P. Garvey 

PERMANENT INTERMITTENT POLICE OFFICERS 

John F. Carmichael Patrick J. Kenney 

Joseph G. Cavanaugh Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr. 

Lorna C. Fabbo Shirley M. Rossi 

Ruth E. Gaffey Daniel J. Sicard 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 

(All appointments expire April 1992 unless otherwise stated.) 



TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 

Michael J. Sullivan 

TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

Robert G. Stokes 
October 1 , 1990 - September 30, 1993 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Kenneth P. Feeney 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Georgia K. Colivas 

TOWN COUNSEL 

Charles Fuller, Jr. 

BOARD OF HEALTH 



Heidi F. Groff 
Joan A. Willgohs 
Neil D. MacKenzie 



David F. McCue 

Eric W. O'Brien 

Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 



John J. McKeever 
Peyton C. March 
Leland D. Beverage 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 



SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 
Edward M. Hinkley 

TREE WARDEN 
Edward M. Hinkley 



1992 
1993 
1994 



1992 
1993 
1994 



1992 
1993 
1994 



FIELD DRIVER AND FENCE VIEWER 

John P. O'Toole 

ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 

Raymond M. Burton 
Jennifer Shaw-Verrochi , Assistant 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Jennifer Shaw Verrochi 
Susan Steele, D.V.M., Assistant 

POUND KEEPER 

Roy Owen 

INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

John P. O'Toole, Inspector of Buildings 

Anthony Calo, Assistant Inspector of Buildings 

Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 

John A. Rose, Jr., Assistant Gas Inspector 

John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Joseph F. Erskine, Wiring Inspector 

Tauno 0. Aalto, Assistant Wiring Inspector 

James J. Leonard, Assistant Wiring Inspector 

OFFICIAL GREETER OF THE TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

Joseph L. Marcionette, Deceased 
Joseph E. Ryan 

OFFICIAL HISTORIAN OF THE TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

Richard P.DeSorgher 

OFFICIAL KEEPER OF THE TOWN CLOCK 

Austin C. Buchanan Edward M. Hinkley, Assistant 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

William H. Dunlea, Jr. 1992 

Mary I. MairEtienne 1993 

Roberta A. Kolsti 1994 

VETERANS' DEPARTMENT 

Paul F. Curran, Director, Agent, Burial Agent 
G. Marshall Chick, Graves Officer 



10 



COLLECTOR OF WATER AND SEWER USE CHARGES 



Robert G. Stokes 



September 30, 1993 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



Patricia A. Rioux 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



Patricia A. Rioux 



PUBLIC WEIGHER 



Patricia A. Rioux 



CONSTABLES AND KEEPERS OF THE LOCK UP 



Richard D. Bishop 
Raymond M. Burton, Jr 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
John F. Carmichael 
Joseph G. Cavanaugh 
Lorna C. Fabbo 
Dana P. Friend 
John T. Garvey 
Shawn P. Garvey 
Stephen H. Grover 
Robert G. Hudson 
Richard D. Hurley 
Ronald E. Kerr 



George W. Kingsbury 
Thomas M. LaPlante, 
William H. Mann 
John L. Mayer 
Thomas P. McNiff 
Michael Mushnick 
Robert E. Naughton 
Louise Papadoyiannis 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Daniel J. Sicard 
Thomas Tabarani 
Raymond J. Wheeler 
John W. Wilhelmi 



Jr. 



POLICE MATRONS 



Jessie A. Erskine 
Lorna C. Fabbo 
Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
Mary I. MairEtienne 



Jennifer Shaw Verocchi 



Elisabeth T. Mann 
Louise Papadoyiannis 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Mary L. Solan" 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 



Maj. Abraham F. Abdallah 
Leo Acera 
Jerry W. Adams 
Albert Baima 
Stephen Bassett 
Edwin Bettencourt 
Herbert Burr 
William A. Carlson 
John F. Carmichael 
Herbert M. Carr 
Jonathan M. Carroll 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Joseph Concannon 
Robert E. Currie 
William J. Davis 
Thomas G. Degnim 
Joseph T. DeStito 



Robert V. Eklund, Jr, 
Leo R. Ethier, Jr. 
Glen R. Eykel 
Jeffrey M. Farrell 
Susan A. Fornaciari 
John Gerlach 
John J. Hackett, Jr. 
Steven F. Hagan 
Thomas Hamano 
Patrick Harris 
Timothy P. Heinz 
John Holmes 
Pamela P. Holmes 
David J. Holt 
Marsha P. Hunter 
Wi lliam D. Jones 
Winslow Karlson III 



Paul J. Murphy 
Frank S. Newel I 
Warren J. O'Brien 
Peter Opanasets 
Grover T. Owens 
James P. Pignon 
Stephen K. Plympton 
Janet M. Poirier 
Gary C. Rowley 
Robert J. Shannon 
Carl Sheridan 
Paul Sicard 
Charles H. Stone, Jr 
John F. Sullivan 
Domenic J. Tiberi 
J. Robert Tocci 
Willi am Treeful 



11 



Patricia L. Diamond 
Robert A. Dixon 
Michael J. Doran 
Kenneth Dunbar 
Wi 1 1 iam J . Dwyer 
David C. Egy 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS (Cont'd) 
Thomas Leen, Jr. 
Joy Leonard 
Roderick A. MacLeod 
David R. McConnell 
Edward J. Meau 
Aaron J. Mick 



Armando Viera, Jr. 
Thomas Ualsh 
Alan F. Washkewits 
Colin T. Wise 
Donna M. Wolfrum 



TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS 



Bruce A. Berry 
John T. Garvey, Jr. 
Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
George Katapodis 
Edwin Kerwin, Sr. 
George W. Kingsbury 
Elisabeth T. Mann 
Wi 1 1 iam H. Mann 



Armando B. Palmieri 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Louise Papadoyianm's 
Warren Robinson 
Mary L. Solan" 
Thomas Tabarani 
Jennifer Shaw Verocchi 



AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OFFICER 
Irene L. O'Toole, Assistant Accountant 
AFFORDABLE HOUSING COMMITTEE 



Michael J. Sullivan 
Bonnie Wren-Burgess 
Ann B. Thompson 
Stephen M. Nolan 
Peter M. Michelson 
Sharon Lowenthal 
Frank Murray 



Fayre C. Stephenson 

L. Paul Galante, resigned 

Margaret E. Bancroft 

Stephen E. Kramer, resigned 

N. Benjamin Aldrich, resigned 

Charles H. Peck 

Mary Ellen Thompson 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



Carl J. Brewer 

Adeline H. Cochrane 

Ben B. Korbly 

Jean C. Brown, Member 

Robert K. Williams, Member 

Madeleine I. Harding, Associate Member 

Annie M. Rogers, Associate Member 

John J. Lynch, Associate Member 



April 1992 

April 1993 

April 1993 

April 1994 

April 1994 

April 1992 

April 1992 

April 1992 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING - SUBDIVISION CONTROL 



Robert F. Sylvia 

Burgess P. Standley 

Ralph C. Good, Jr. 

Sandra G. Munsey, Associate Member 

Charles H. Peck, Associate Member 

Kenneth M. Chi Ids, Jr., Associate Member 



April 
Apr i I 
Apr i I 
April 
April 
Apri I 



1992 
1993 
1994 
1992 
1992 
1992 



ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS COMMITTEE 



Frederick A. Rogers, 
Bruno J. Palumbo 



Jr 



Beverly Hallowell 
Christie A. Shoop 



Michael J. Sullivan 



12 



COUNCIL ON ARTS 



Steven H. Cook 
Mary Ann Hatem 
Amy E. Imber 
Jeffrey A. Masters 
Martha M. Moon 
Marie Zack Nolan 
Wendy Clarridge Corkum 
Laura J. Howick 
Rosalie F. Shirley 
Timothy J. Ryan 
Lucinda Davis 
Francis A. Iafolla 
William F. Pope 



April 
Apri I 
Apr i I 
Apri I 
Apr i I 
April 
Apri I 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1992 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1994 
1994 
1994 
1994 
1996 
1997 
1997 



BLASTING STUDY COMMITTEE 



Joseph D. Codispoti 
Daniel W. Nye 
Robert Sylvia 



William A. Kingsbury 
John P. O'Toole 



BUSINESS & INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE 



Fred W. Clarridge 
Thelma M. Meader 



Clara B. Doub 



Margaret E. Bancroft 



CABLE T.V. COMMITTEE 

Wi lliam F. Kean 
CADD SYSTEM COMMITTEE 

Peter R. Smith 



Lorraine G. Holland 
Daniel W. Nye 



Robert H. Gibbs 



Louise E. Rose 



CAPITAL BUDGET COMMITTEE 



John F. Ganley 
Nancy Temple Horan 
Margaret E. Bancroft 



George Niles 
John A. Moretti 
Michael J. Sullivan 



CEMETERY AGENT 

Lawrence G. Whitestone 
CIVIL DEFENSE 

Vincent M. Cellucci, Director 

Thomas Hamano, Underwater Rescue and Recovery 

Patrick S. Harris, Chief Radio Operator 

Judith C. Harris, Radio Operator 

Harold Economos, Radio Operator 

Barry M. Glassman, Radio Operator 

William Johnson, Radio Operator 

Vernon Valero, Radio Operator 

Patricia A. Rioux, Shelter Manager 



13 



CIVIL DEFENSE AUXILIARY POLICE OFFICERS 



Vincent M. Cellucci, Deputy Chief 
Bruce Berry, Sergeant 



Paul B. Alberta 
Raymond M. Burton, Jr 
Harold Economos 
Robert S. Gallagher 
Barry M. Glassman 
Thomas Hamano 
Judith C. Harris 
Patrick S. Harris 
Wi lliam Johnson 
Craig Jones 
Eric Jones 
Nicholas R. Hatczak 



John L. Mayer 
Thomas P. McNiff 
Lorieanne D. Ni les 
Thomas Ralph 
Tobey J. E. Reed 
Patricia A. Rioux 
James S. Ryan, Jr. 
Gordon Spencer 
Vernon Valero 
Jennifer Shaw Verrochi 
Armando R. Viera, Jr. 



Charles Fuller, Jr. 
Stephen Buckley, Jr, 
Richard D. Hurley 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING TEAM 



Paul J. Williamson 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 



COMMUNITY GARDENS COMMITTEE 



Aldo L. D'Angelo 
Leonard C. Haigh 
Harold F. Pritoni, Sr, 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



John Thompson 

Scott D. Pitz 

Ann Lee Howell 

Denise Yurkofsky 

Douglas S. Sparrow 

Craig S. Harwood 

Caroline D. Standley 

Theresa A. Cos, Associate Member 

Betty A. Kaerwer, Associate Member 

James G. White, Associate Member 



Carol J. Dennison 
Harvey D. Hoover 
Roy Owen 



April 1992 
April 1992 
April 1992 
April 1993 
April 1994 
April 1994 
1994 
1992 



Apr i I 
Apri I 
April 1992 
April 1992 



CONSTABLE FOR ELECTIONS 

Nancy J. Preston 

CONTRACT COMPLIANCE OFFICER 

Michael J. Sullivan 

CREDIT UNION COMMITTEE 



Wi lliam J. Donovan 
Robert E. Kennedy, Jr. 



Irene L. O'Toole 
James F. Lynn 



14 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



Paul E. H ink ley 
Ann B. Thompson 
John F. Ganley 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 



April 1992 

April 1992 

April 1993 

April 1994 



NATIONAL ORGANIZATION ON DISABILITY 

Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. 

ELECTION OFFICERS 



Paul F. Alfano 
Jean 0. Butler 
Barbara Connors 
Ann J. Grady 
William Hallowell 
Richard D. Hinkley 
Elizabeth Lordan 
Joyce C. Notine 
Nancy Pritoni 



Katherine Buchanan 
Adeline H. Cochrane 
Robert F. Finn 
Beverly Hallowell 
Paul E. Hinkley 
Steven E. Kramer 
Mabel le E. Maguire 
Elmer 0. Portmann 
Ronald Rioux 



EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES RESPONSE COMMITTEE 



Raymond M. Burton 
Richard D. Hurley 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 



Robert E. Currie 
Joan M. Kiessling 
James D. Sullivan, M.D, 



Michael J. Sullivan 
EMERGENCY PLANNING COMMISSION 



Vincent M. Cellucci 
Richard D. Hurley 
Michael J. Sullivan 



Kenneth P. Feeney 
Robert A. Kinsman 
Ann B. Thompson 



George J. Callahan 
Pauline Coo ley 
Robert H. White 



EMPLOYEE INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Georganne I verson- Ke 1 1 ey 



Malcolm J.Gibson 
Virginia A. Murley 
Robert J. Santoro 



John P. O'Toole 



ENFORCING OFFICER FOR ZONING 



Anthony Calo, Assistant 



Lei and D. Beverage 
John F. Ganley 
John J. McKeever 
Robert G. Stokes 



ENTERPRISE FUND COMMITTEE 



FAIR HOUSING OFFICER 
Michael J. Sullivan 



Kenneth P. Feeney 
Peyton C. March 
Matthew F. Schmid 
Michael J. Sullivan 



15 



FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 
Robert G. Stokes Reverend Robert L. Wood 

STUDY COMMITTEE TO DEVELOP 458 MAIN STREET 



Jane B. Archer 
Francis A. Iafol la 



Margaret Bancroft 
Walter M. Frank 



Elizabeth Moore 



HAZARDOUS WASTE COMMITTEE 



Deborah C. Dumphy 



Donald R. Senger 
HAZMAT COMMITTEE 



Jesse L. Matuson 



Vincent M. Cellucci 

Kenneth P. Feeney 

Richard D. Hurley 

William A. Kingsbury 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



John Hooper 

David F. Temple 

Burgess P. Standley 

Paul E. Nyren, Jr. 

Donald J. MacDonald 

Electa Kane Tritsch, resigned 

Eleanor Anes, Associate Member 

Robert Blair, Associate Member, resigned 

Richard P. DeSorgher, Associate Member 

David L. Wilmarth, Associate Member 



Robert 


A. Kinsman 


Michael 


J. Sull 


. i van 


Ann B. 


Thompson 


Joan A. 


Willgohs 




Apr i I 


1992 




April 


1993 




Apr i I 


1993 




April 


1994 




Apr i I 


1994 




Apr i I 


1994 




April 


1992 




Apri I 


1992 




Apr i I 


1992 




April 


1992 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



John Hooper 
Stephen M. Nolan 
Donald MacDonald 
Paul E. Nyren, Jr. 
Richard DeSorgher 



Raymond M. Burton 
Dr. LeBaron C. Colt, 
Lauren C. Cope 
Gerard Dietrich 
Kathleen M. Dietrich 
Craig S. Harwood 
Edmund L. Kelley 
H. Tracy Mitchell 
Barbara J. Murphy 

Ben j amine H. Martin 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY HUNTING 



Jr. 



Ex Officio Members 





April 


1992 




Apr i I 


1992 




Apr i I 


1993 




Apri I 


1993 




Apri I 


1992 


Linda C 


. Nyren 




Neal R. 


Olsen 




Francis 


J. Perry III 


[ 


Robert I 


:. Rechner 




Kathy R 


. Simon 




Ross W. 


Simon 




Roger S 


. Sweeney 




Adam A. 


Vi Hone 




Frederii 


:k R. L. Wise 



Thomas Sheehan 



16 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCING AUTHORITY 



Robert J. McCarthy 
Pauline M. Goucher 
Charles H. Peck 
Ann Lee Howell 
Stephen Buckley, Jr, 



April 1992 

April 1993 

April 1994 

April 1995 

April 1996 



W. Grant Chambers 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Joseph B. McWilliams 



KINGSBURY POND COMMITTEE 
Edward Hill, resigned Paul E. Nyren, Jr. 
Paul Simpson Graeme Justice, resigned 

Donald J. Mac Donald Thomas S. Lingel, Assoc, mem. 
Robert Mannino, resigned Richard Ostrander 



Kenneth P. Feeney 
Weston G. Kolsti 
Eric W. O'Brien 



LAND MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 



Edward J. MacDonald 



Barbara Leighton 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Michael Cronin 



John A. Moretti 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr, 
Michael J. Sullivan 



Nancy J. Preston 



Margaret E. Bancroft 



LOCAL AUCTION PERMIT AGENT 
Irene L. O'Toole 
LOCAL WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT OFFICIAL 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
LOCAL ELECTION DISTRICT REVIEW COMMITTEE 

Robert G. Stokes 
MEDFIELD DESIGNEE - MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 
Michael J. Sullivan 
METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

August 3, 1992 
MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 



Paul F. Curran 
Clifford G. Doucette 
William Drengberg 
John F. Ganley 
Richard D. Hurley 
William A. Kingsbury 



James F. Tubridy 



Albert J. Manganello, Jr, 
William H. Mann 
Frank C. Mayer 
Irene L. O'Toole 
Dorcas B. Owen 
Joseph E. Ryan 



17 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 



Paul F. Curran 
Robert A. Kinsman 



Richard F. DeSorgher 
David F. Temple 



Patricia A. Walsh 
HILLIS CONSORTIUM FOR RECYCLING 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
MINORITY BUSINESS ENTERPRISE OFFICER 
Irene L. O'Toole 
MUNICIPAL CENSUS SUPERVISOR 
Nancy J. Preston 
NEPONSET WATER SUPPLY PROTECTION STUDY COMMITTEE 
Leland D. Beverage 
REPRESENTATIVE TO THE NORFOLK COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 
John F. Ganley 
OPEN SPACE PLANNING COMMITTEE 



Margaret E. Bancroft 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
Jesse L. Matuson, resigned 
Jonathan Bennett 
Charles F. Ferullo, Jr. 
James W. Sullivan 



Barbara Cushman-Lodge 
PARKING CLERK AND HEARING OFFICER 
Nancy J. Preston 
PESTICIDE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Eric W. O'Brien 
Martha L. Smick 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Caroline D. Standley 
Christine M. Hajjar 
Jane Ann Hayes 



Edward M. Hinkley 
Graeme Justice 



Thompson Lingel 
Thomas M. Reis 
Richard D. Hurley 
John Rose 
William A. Kingsbury 



William M. Jackson 
Robert A. Kinsman 



Alan D. Paul 



PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING COMMITTEE 



Michael J. Sullivan 
Ann B. Thompson 
Walter Reynolds, Jr. 
Robert G. Stokes 



PUBLIC WORKS PROJECTS COMMITTEE 



Kenneth M. Chi Ids, Jr. 
Robert J. Larkin 



Kenneth P. Feeny 
Michael J. Sullivan 



18 



RECYCLING COMMITTEE 



Barbara Donnelly 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
John C. Moon 
Erin Pastuszenski 



Cheryl E. Dunlea 
Cynthia Greene 
Daniel O'Toole 
David F. Temple 



Jane B. Archer 
Kenneth P. Feeney 



REGIONALIZATION GROUP - MILLIS 
Francis J. Cusack 
JOINT REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 
Daniel L. Jones, Jr. 
RIGHT-TO-KNOW COORDINATOR 
William A. Kingsbury 
SAFETY COMMITTEE 

John A. Moretti 



Marguerite M. Eppich 
Irene L. O'Toole 



THREE RIVERS INTERLOCAL COUNCIL (MAPC) 



Margaret E. Bancroft 



Matthew A. Anderton 
Allison M Foley 
Brian A. Henry 
Brian M. Maser 
Juan D. Santos 
David F. Cahill 
Melissa P. Kelcourse 
Eric B. Palson 
Courtney E. Cannon 
Adam N. Gottlieb 
Garrett W. Larkin 
Christine E. Nolan 
Heather Wood 
Audrey C. Duncan 
David J. Ha j jar 
Tracey Anne Powers 
William "Jack" Heller 
Elizabeth Newton 
David Taylor 



YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 

Allison E. Bruns 
John F. Fratolillo, Jr. 
Jennifer M. Logdson 
Erin L. Medina 
Anna -Man" Spognardi 
Paul L. Galante III 
Sara E. Mastronardi 
Daniel J. Rosen 
Peter C. Cornwel, Jr. 
Alisa N. Kendrick 
Kenneth M. Martin 
Mary Kathleen Sullivan 
Nicole B. Bois 
Peter M. Gambardella 
Jennifer L. Mercadante 
Gay W. D'Amaro 
Robert Hudson 
Regina O'Connor 



Michael J. Sullivan 



Lauren E. Flannery 
Michael A. Hajjar 
Jodi Marino 
Jaclyn M. O'Leary 
Brett A. Thomson 
Lisa A. Hal I i day 
Marc R. Mercadante 
Nicholas J. Scobbo III 
Jon M. Fletcher 
Alexis Kosc 
Catherine Moroney 
Gregory B. Thomson 
Robert J. Counihan 
David L. Logsdon 
Glen Panciocco 
Mary Gi His 
Thomas P. McNiff 
Harold F. Pritoni. Jr. 



APPOINTED BY ASSESSORS 

Stanley E. Bergeron, Assistant Assessor 
Irene M. Hart ling, Assistant Assessor 
Marjorie M. Temple, Assistant Assessor 



19 



APPOINTED BY TOUN ACCOUNTANT 

Irene L. O'Toole 

APPOINTED BY TOUN CLERK 

Dorcas B. Owen, Assistant 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr., Assistant Hearing Officer 

APPOINTED BY CHAIRMAN OF THE SELECTMEN 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

AND THE MOOERATOR 

VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE REPRESENTATIVE 

Werner F. Ki ess ling, resigned June 30, 1992 

APPOINTED BY FIRE CHIEF 



Charles G. Seavey, Deputy Fire Chief 

Thomas Seeley, Captain 

Clinton M. Clark, Lieutenant 

Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr., Lieutenant 

Richard M. Rogers, Lieutenant 

David C. O'Toole, Lieutenant 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 



William R. Domey, P.E., Engineer/Agent 
John J. Keefe, R.S., Milk Inspector/Agent 
Mae L. Otting, Administrative Assistant 



April 1992 
April 1992 
April 1992 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

DEPUTY MOOERATOR 
Tidal B. Henry 

WARRANT COMMITTEE 



Stephen Buckley, Jr. 

Mary W. Harney 

Michael Kosc 

Thompson S. Lingel 

George P. Niles, Jr. 

Neal R. Olsen 

Clarence A. Purvis 

Martin Rosen 

Matthew F. Schmid 

Judith T. Sparrow, resigned 



April 1992 

April 1993 

April 1992 

April 1993 

April 1994 

April 1994 

April 1992 

April 1994 

April 1993 

April 1993 



20 



PERMANENT SCHOOL BUILDING AND PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Mark H. Kaizerman April 1994 

F. Paul Quatromoni April 1992 

David R. Iverson April 1992 

Francis J. Cusack, resigned April 1993 

Harry C. Merrow April 1993 

Elmer 0. Portmann April 1993 

Thomas M. Reis f Ex Officio 

COMMITTEE TO STUDY FEASIBILITY OF REGIONALIZATION 

Justin L. Brady Elmer 0. Portmann 

Richard P. DeSorgher J. Gary Walsh 
Werner F. Ki ess ling 

APPOINTED BY THE COMMITTEE CONSISTING OF THE MODERATOR. THE 

CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN AND CHAIRMAN OF THE WARRANT COMMITTEE 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

Paul J. Williamson November 30, 1991 

James F. Lynn November 30, 1992 

Thomas N. Fannin November 30, 1993 

APPOINTED BY THE PLANNING BOARD 



ASSOCIATE PLANNING BOARD MEMBER FOR SITE PLAN REVIEWS 
Joseph R. Parker, Jr. April, 1992 



LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 
formerly, THE MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 

Martha L. Smick 
Joseph C. Donnelly, Jr. 
Daniel L. Jones, Jr. 
Jeffrey Masters 
Patrick C. Gordon 
Denise Yurkofsky 
Marjorie M. Temple 
Geralyn M. Warren 
Charles H. DeBevoise 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 



Paul J. Alfano 
Richard A. Moon 
Ann J. Grady 
Jane Kimball 
Philip P. Bonanno 



April, 


1994 


April, 


1994 


April, 


1992 


Apri I, 


1992 


April, 


1992 


April, 


1993 


April, 


1993 


Apri I, 


1993 


Apr i I , 


1994 


April, 


1992 


April, 


1992 


April, 


1993 


April, 


1993 


April, 


1994 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

Marguerite M. Eppich, Assistant Treasurer - September 30, 1993 

Nancy Griffin, Assistant Collector - September 30, 1993 

Joseph A. Laz and Thomas E. Laz, Deputy Collectors 



21 



BOARD, COMMITTEE AND COMMISSION MEETINGS 



NAME 



DAY 



TIME 



PLACE 



Annual Town Election Last Monday in March 



Annual Town Meeting Last Monday in April 



Appeals Board 
Arts Counci I 
Assessors 
Civil Defense 

Conservation 

Board of Health 
Historical Comm. 
Housing Authority 

Library Trutees 
Park & Recreation 
Planning Board 
Recycling 
School Cofnmittee 

Selectmen 

Warrant Commitee 
Water & Sewer 



Wednesdays as needed 
Bi -Monthly 

1st Thursdays of month 
1st Monday of month 

1st Thursday of month 

(other evenings as neccesary) 

1st Wed. & 3rd Mon. of month 

3rd Wednesday of month 

3rd Monday of month 

2nd Tuesday of month 

2nd & 4th Tuesday of month 

Monday 

Tuesday 

1st & 3rd Mon. Sept. -June 
(once a month July-August) 

Tuesday, Sept. -June 

(every other Tues. July-Aug.) 

Tuesday, Fall to Town Meeting 

1st & 3rd Tuesday of month 



to 8 P.M. 


Memorial 
School 


7:30 P.M. 


Kingsbury 
High School 


7:30 P.M. 


Town Hall 


8:00 P.M. 


Zullo 
Gallery 


7:00 P.M. 


Police 
Station 


7:30 P.M. 


Town Hall 


6:30 P.M. 


Town Hall 


8:00 P.M. 


Town Hall 


7:30 P.M. 


Tilden 
Village 


7:30 P.M. 


Library 


7:30 P.M. 


Pfaff Ctr. 


8:00 P.M. 


Town Hall 


7:30 P.M. 


Town Hall 


7:30 P.M. 


Dale St. 


7:00 P.M. 


Town Hall 


7:30 P.M. 


Town Hall 


7:30 P.M. 


Town Hall 



22 



DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1991 



23 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To The Residents of Medfield: 

Ue reorganized for the ensuing year and elected Ann B. Thompson 
Chairman, John F. Ganley, Clerk and congratulated Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. on 
his re-election to a second term on the board. 

It is interesting to note that in 1971, the town report noted that the next 
ten to twenty years may be the most crucial years in the financial history of 
Medfield. The factors creating this crisis were heavy reliance on property 
tax, inflation, increased complexity and ecological demands. The same could 
be written for the year 1991. In 1981, the town started to implement the 
provisions of "Proposition 2 1/2" and the various Town boards, commissions 
and department heads reduced their budgets and services and we were still 
reducing in 1991. When Proposition 2 1/2 was passed by the voters in 1980 it 
was assumed that it would reduce the burden placed upon the property tax as 
the largest source of revenue for financing local services. This assumption 
proved false for Medfield. In fiscal 1980 the property tax levy supplied 
63.8% of the Town's total revenue and in fiscal 1992, the tax levy supplied 
67.9% of its total revenues. Thus, Medfield is today more dependent upon the 
property tax as its major revenue source than it was a decade ago. 

We are continuing to see decreases in state and federal aid and the towns are 
left on their own to either "sink" or "swim." Unfortunately, the cities and 
towns that are poorly managed seem to be the ones that are the recipient of 
relief. We, in Medfield have been fortunate to have had benefit of sound 
fiscal planning over the last two decades, but we are being stretched to our 
limit. The state and federal government must wake up to the fact that we 
must have a tax structure that provides revenues to local governments and a 
political system that requires the state and federal governments to balance 
their budgets and limit their borrowing, and stop mandating programs and 
costs upon local government. In the meantime Medfield will have to struggle 
to survive and provide the quality of services that residents have come to 
expect. 

The Capital Budget at the Annual Town Meeting included $25,000. for a High 
School Renovation Study. The School Building and Planning Committee was 
reactivated and is working diligently to provide a solution to the 
maintenance and space requirements at the High School. 

As authorized by Article 54 of the Annual Town Meeting, an Independent 
Committee to Study the Feasibility for Regionalization of the Medfield 
Schools was appointed. This group will report back as soon as possible or no 
later than the 1992 Town Meeting. 

A Special Town Meeting was called in September for the purpose of dealing 
with the reductions in the Local Aid that came about after our Annual Town 
Meeting. 

HEALTH INSURANCE: 

The rising cost of Health Insurance and how to deal with it was a major issue 
this year. The Insurance Advisory Committee, the Employees Insurance 
Committee and Town Administrator Sullivan spent a lot of time and effort to 
try to get this issue resolved. Blue Cross Blue Shield notified the Town 
that we would not be eligible to participate in their plan because the 
percentage of enrol lees was below 20 %, and cancelled our contract as of De- 
cember 31st. We were able to contract with Pilgrim Health to supply us with 



24 



a self- insured indemnity plan which will be put in place starting next year. 



The Cafeteria Plan was finally "on line" in July. The Personnel Board was 
instrumental in suggesting that we offer this benefit to our Town employees. 
This plan gives the employee the opportunity to pay for their health 
insurance with pre-tax dollars, thus helping to alleviate some of the burden 
of rising health insurance costs. 

STATE OF EMERGENCY: 

Pursuant to the Governor's office declaring a State of Emergency because of 
"Hurricane Bob," the Board of Selectmen declared a State of Emergency for the 
Town of Medfield at 10:10 a.m. on Monday, August 19 f 1991. All departments 
are to be commended for the fine job they did as a result of this storm. A 
special mention should be given to Vincent Cellucci and the volunteer Civil 
Defense Auxiliary Police Officers. The Town was fortunate to come through 
this storm with only tree, limb and road damage. 

STATE HOSPITAL: 

Medfield State Hospital experienced a turnover of chief personnel in October. 
The Board met with Mr. Clifford Robinson, MetroSouth Area Director and Mr. 
James Foley, MetroSouth Area Director of Operations now based at Medfield 
State Hospital, in an effort to establish communications and to inform them 
of our concerns. Chief Operating Officer Margaret LeMontagne has also been 
very willing to meet with us throughout the year to resolve issues that have 
come up. The lines of communication have been opened and remain open 
twenty- four hours a day, and we hope that this will continue for the safety, 
security and well-being of all concerned. 

RETIREMENTS: 

During this year, two of our long time town hall employees joined the ranks 
of retirees. Pauline Goucher, Administrative Assistant retired in February 
after 31 years of dedicated service. She worked with 21 Selectmen over those 
years, and provided continuity and expertise in a manner that was 
unsurpassed. Pauline also served on many boards and committees in the town 
and was instrumental in instituting many cost saving measures, especially in 
the area of energy conservation. She had a wealth of information, whether it 
was about the history of the town, or town government, and she will be 
missed. 

Mildred E. Willis retired as Planning Board Assistant in June after 21 years 
of service. She served many Planning Board members and was a valuable 
member of that team during a period of considerable growth and change in the 
Town of Medfield. 

In February, the Board of Selectmen honored Lieutenant George DeVenanzi who 
is retiring from active duty from the Medfield Fire Department after 44 
years of dedicated service. 

PERSONNEL CHANGES: 

Georgia Colivas joined the town hall staff as Town Accountant. 

Planning Board Member Joseph Parker resigned in March and Daniel Nye was 
elected to fill the vacancy until the next election. Park and Recreation 
Commissioner Michael Medina resigned in November, and Leanne Velanchansky was 
elected to fill this position until the next election. 



25 



John J. McKeever was appointed to the Water and Sewerage Board to replace 
Geoffrey M. Sauter who resigned. He brought with him the expertise to help 
implement the Water and Sewer Enterprise Fund which was voted at the annual 
town meeting. 

OPERATION DESERT STORM: 

This year commemorated the 50th anniversary of our country's involvement in 
World War II, and unfortunately, the year 1991 saw another confrontation, 
although on a smaller scale, in the Persian Gulf. The Town is very proud of 
the 28 Medfield men and women who served our country as a result of this con- 
flict. The patriotic spirit reigned everywhere in town, and in a show of 
support, Main Street and many homes and businesses were bedecked with yellow 
ribbons and American flags. The Selectmen, residents, and school children 
wrote letters and sent packages to those overseas. We were happy to see the 
swift end to this conflict. We welcomed a number of returning servicemen 
who visited the town offices and schools to express their appreciation and to 
relate their experiences. 

FIREARMS BYLAW: 

A Hunting Study Committee was formed before Town Meeting and gave its rec- 
ommendations regarding the regulation of the discharge of firearms which were 
incorporated in an article presented at Town Meeting as an alternative to the 
article by petition received by the Selectmen that prohibited the discharge 
of firearms in Medfield except in certain limited cases. Town Meeting voted 
to ban all shooting in the Town except for seven lawful reasons for discharge 
of firearms. The Attorney General sent back approval of the article with the 
stipulation that the restrictions contained in the bylaw are not applicable 
to any land owned or managed by the Commonwealth. A request for a 
Declaratory Judgment was filed at Dedham Superior Court in November and 
motions were filed in December. At year end, the town was still waiting for 
the judgment on the Attorney General's opinion. 

RECYCLING: 

The Town voted to adopt mandatory recycling at town meeting, but opted to 
postpone enforcement until July of 1992. The Medfield Recycling Committee 
has done a tremendous job in educating the public on recycling. They have 
been active in deliberating whether the town should join the Mi 1 1 is 
Consortium Recycling Facility or independently recycle, and the matter has 
yet to be resolved. 

STATE GOVERNMENT: 

This year saw a change in the Governor's office, Norfolk County Treasurer's 
office and the senate seat in our district. The Selectmen welcomed 
Christopher Lane, who is the first resident of Medfield to become a State 
Senator. Senator Lane has been active in many issues that involve Medfield 
including the state hospital, public safety, and Hurricane Bob cleanup. 

SPECIAL TOWN PROJECTS: 

After eleven years, the Town Common has become a reality. We would like to 
thank the many residents and businessmen who donated toward this beautiful 
new addition to our town center. A special thank you to the Medfield Garden 
Club for their help with the landscaping and the installation of the elegant 
perennial garden. The one project left is the gazebo, and although 
businesses and individuals have donated to this project already, we are still 
actively soliciting donations. We are grateful to the many citizens who have 



26 



contributed not only by donations, but by time and hard work. This is a fine 
example of what a town can accomplish on minimal funds when everyone works 
together. 

The restoration of the Grist Mill at Kingsbury Pond began this year. We have 
a very enthusiastic and hard working committee and good progress has been 
made toward making this a working mill and recreating an important part of 
our past history. 

Another successful Hazardous Waste Day was held jointly with the towns of 
Dover and Sherborn in June. This has become a very popular event, and 
Medfield will be the host town in 1992. 

Although monetary donations are always welcomed for the projects listed 
above, you can help by donating your returnable bottles and cans. Bins are 
provided for this purpose at the transfer station. 

Plans are going forward in the area of affordable housing. In March, the 
Selectmen agreed to transfer title of town land to the Medfield Community 
Development Corporation in March for seventeen units of single family housing 
on Dale Street to be called Allendale. The application for the Local 
Initiative Program was approved in April by the Executive Office of 
Communities and Development. The corporation is working very hard toward a 
goal of breaking ground in 1992. 

TRIBUTES: 

We were saddened this year by the passing of three former Selectmen, Joseph 
Marcionnette, Richard Connors, and Walter Frank. Each had their own 
individual style and contributed much to the development of Medfield in 
various ways over the years. The one thing that they all had in common was 
their dedication, enthusiasm, and love for the Town. Medfield is a better 
place because of these fine gentlemen and selectmen. 

Citations were presented in May to Detective Robert Naughton, Sergeant 
Robert Kerr, Officer Robert Brady, Dispatcher Patricia Rioux, and Police 
Chief Richard Hurley in appreciation of their efforts in regard to an 
attempted robbery of a Wells Fargo armored truck in front of Bay Bank. The 
Town of Medfield is proud of them and is very fortunate to have such 
dedicated men and women on our police force. 

Joseph D. Codispoti was presented with a citation for his service on the 
Planning Board from 1986 to 1991. Robert M. Mannino, Jr. was also honored 
for his service on the Historical Commission, Historic District Commission 
and the Kingsbury Pond Committee. Both expressed the opinion that their 
experience was a rewarding one. These two men are a fine example of the 
quality of volunteer ism that Medfield enjoys. 

CIVIC EVENTS: 

The Selectmen attended many events and ceremonies throughout the year 
including dedication ceremonies for Peter Panciocco Civic Square, Ocran G. 
Knehr Square, and Thomas A. Blake Middle School. 

The Selectmen attended the event honoring former Selectman Robert J. Larkin 
as "Citizen of the Year" in May. We participated in activities sponsored by 
the Shannon McCormack Foundation in June, and MEMO Day in September when 
John Hannah, Medfield resident and Football Hall of Fame Inductee, was 
presented with a proclamation from the Town. In November, the Board of 
Selectmen along with the Warrant Committee attended an Appreciation of 



27 



Volunteers Brunch sponsored by the League of Women Voters in their honor. 

The Selectmen were honored to attend a tree planting ceremony at the Town 
Common conducted by Medfield Boy Scout Troop 10 in memory of their Senior 
Patrol Leader Christopher Naughton who was fatally injured in a tragic 
accident. 



The Memorial Day Parade was especially meaningful this year in light of our 
most recent conflict in the Gulf. We remembered the casualties and gave 
thanks that so many men and women returned home safely. We had a great 
turnout, and veterans of the Persian Gulf War marched proudly along with 
their fellow veterans and citizens. 

CONCLUSION: 

We would like to pay tribute to the over 400 citizens of the Town of 
Medfield listed on the previous pages who serve the Town on the various 
boards, commissions and committees for little or no pay. The Town is 
fortunate to have so many talented residents who give willingly of their time 
and talents. The town has benefited greatly from their expertise. The 
community spirit that prevails in Medfield makes it a great town in which to 
live. We encourage all our citizens to participate in town government by 
volunteering and especially by voting and attending Town Meetings. This is 
your town, and you do have a say in how it is run. If we all work together, 
and make decisions in a fair and democratic way, we will survive this 
difficult time and look forward to a bright future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ann B. Thompson, Chairman 
John F. Ganley, Clerk 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




Past and Present Selectmen honor 
Pauline M. Goucher 



28 



STREETS , SEWER, AND WATER DEPARTMENTS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my 10th Annual Report for the Public Works Department. 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

Resurfacing: The following streets were slurry sealed: Robert Sproul 
Road, Pound Street, Elm Street, and Knollwood Road. This was the first time 
this method of resurfacing was used in Medfield. The streets selected were 
not only selected because of need for repairs, but because of a wide variety 
of traffic counts. The Highway Department evaluate the longevity of this 
product, and the findings will help us in the future to seek a more economical 
solution to road maintenance. 

Federal Highway Study: State and Federal Highway Engineers have 
installed equipment in the road bed of Route 27, North Meadows Road. This 
twenty year study will be used to measure traffic counts, types of vehicles, 
and wear of the road surface. 

Marlyn Road Drainage: This 75% state and 25% town funded project 
consisted of 200 feet of 48" pipe and 600 feet of 42" pipe as well as 5 catch 
basins and 9 manholes at a bid price of $165,550. The final cleanup and 
inspection will be completed in 1992. 

Dale Street Drainage: The Highway Department installed 673 feet of 
drainage, 4 catch basins and 2 manholes in Dale Street. Also, as part of the 
same project, we added 400 feet of drainage, 4 catch basins and 3 manholes to 
the new section of the cemetery. This project was completed by a private 
contractor and highway personnel. 

The Medfield Highway Department performed routine maintenance of 75 miles 
of roadway with 2423 tons of asphalt. 

Town Hall: The Public Works Department assisted in the gas tank removal 
at the Town Hall, by arranging for lab testing of dirt and repairing the 
parking lot after the tank was removed. 

South Street Extension: South Street was placed on the 5 year 
construction list. This project is eligible for both state and federal 
funding. 

Curve Street Bridge: The State owned bridge was approved for a 
preliminary engineering study. 

Sub-Division Inspections: The following sub-divisions and A.N.R. lots 
were inspected for proper installation of Streets, Water, Sewer and Drainage: 



Woodcliff, The Meadows, Tall Woods, Plantation, Powder House, The 
Preserve at Kingsbury, and Rocky Acres. 

High School Soccer Field: The Medfield Highway Department, along with 
private contractors and an Army Reserve Unit, began construction on a new 
soccer field behind the High School. The fields were brought up to sub-grade 
and drainage was added. The fields will be loamed and seeded in 1992. 



29 



Grist Mill: Repairs to the Grist Hill at Kingsbury Pond received some 
assistance from the Highway Department. 



Commercial Drivers License: Members of the Medfield Public Works 
Department took the federal mandated Commercial Drivers License test for Class 
I and Class II licenses. The exam was given on a Saturday in July at Natick 
High School and the 100% pass rate is a good example of the department's 
dedication and professionalism. 

Hurricane Bob: On August 19, at 12:30 P.M. Hurricane Bob had reached 
inland to Medfield with accompaning winds of 75-80 MPH. By 9:00 P.M. it was 
over and all roads were open to vehicle traffic. The storm also brought 6.05 
inches of rain during a 48 hour period, recorded at the Wastewater Treatment 
Plant. During the following two weeks, clean-up was conducted by the Public 
Works Department. Damages were estimated at $93,354. The Federal Government 
will reimburse the town $70,696. of this amount. 



Transfer Station: In 1991 we trucked 5,356 tons of solid waste to 
Wheelabrator Incinerator inMillbury. 



the 



Recycl ing: 



Glass 
Leaves 
Cans 
Paper 
Light Metal 



102 tons 

1300 yards 

10.6 tons 

417 tons 

296 tons 



$345.45 







5,920.00 



Deposit Bottles, Cans 33,727 units a $.05 $1,686.15 



TOTAL 



$7,951.60 



Landf i 1 1: The final section of the sanitary landfill was loamed and 
seeded and permanently closed. Presently, the remaining portion of the 
landfill will be used to dispose of street sweepings and road debris. All 
quarterly inspections of monitoring wells have met Department of Environmental 
Quarterly Engineering requirements. 

Snow: Medfield had a mild winter with only 27 1/2 inches of snow and 23 
call outs for salting and sanding operations. At the Annual Town Meeting, 
funds were approved to install calcium chloride, or commonly called salt 
wetting equipment, on Highway Sand trucks. This product will improve the 
ability of the Highway Department to de-ice roadways below 20 degrees 
Fahrenheit, and will also reduce salt applications and sodium levels in our 
drinking water. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 



Final cleanup and inspection of Pine Needle Park sewers was completed 
the Spring of 1991. 



in 



In 1991 we treated 212,861,000 gallons of waste water of which 28,581,175 
gallons came from the State Hospital. We also received 640,090 gallons of 
septage. 

Our contract with the New England Treatment Company was extended to 1996. 
In 1991 we trucked 734,200 gallons of 4% sludge to the Rhode Island Company. 

In July of 1991 the sand filter of the Treatment Plant was taken off-line 
for repairs. The project took 30 days and was completed in house by Treatment 
Plant operators. Part of the project included replacing 50 tons of sand 
med i a . 



30 



Routine inspection of both State and Federal agencies have found 
operation of the Wastewater Treatment to be in good operating order. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 



the 



1991 



The Medfield Water Department pumped 405,154,500 gallons of water in 



Cross Connection Survey: The survey conducted by the Water Department 
revealed 200 violations. This program will also include testing of backflow 
prevention devices three times a year. All state and federal mandated tests 
conducted on Medfi eld's water supply have indicated a high quality water 
supply. 

Well 6: Well 6, located on State Hospital property on the Sherborn line, 
has been granted a water withdrawal permit from the State. The new well will 
be capable of pumping a million gallons of water per day. 

In conclusion, appreciation is expressed to secretaries Edie Fernald of 
the Highway Department and to Evelyn Clarke of the Water and Sewer Department, 
Robert Kennedy, Street Department Foreman, Charles Evans, Water amd Sewer 
Foreman, and Peter Iafolla, Chief Operator of the Wastewater Treatment Plant 
as well as all the men of the various departments who are to be commended for 
continued conscientious public service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kenneth P. Feeney, 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 




Members of the Public Works Department 



31 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This year has been very difficult for the department and the community. 
Acts of violence have continuously plagued our Town. Budget cutbacks have 
angered our residents, especially in the area of safety. Edge lines on the 
road, stop signs and warning signs could not be installed. Extra officer 
assignments during holiday periods, peak traffic hours and high crime times 
had to be eliminated. 

The year started off with an attempted murder and suicide, when Jeffrey 
Tanck shot his wife Jennifer Tanck and killed himself. In May three men 
attempted to holdup a Wells Fargo truck in front of the Bay Bank on Main 
Street. Detective Robert Naughton aborted that holdup and has been highly 
decorated for his efforts. 

In July, a stabbing at a house party consumed the news and hundreds of 
hours of court time. In November, three armed men burst into a downtown 
jewelry store, robbing it of thousands of dollars of jewelry. All these cases 
have been solved, although some defendants are still awaiting trial. 

I wish to thank all the men and women of the Medfield Police Department 
for a job well done. Special thanks to Shirley M. Rossi -Roy who resigned this 
year to relocate in Florida. In every loss, there is always a gain. I would 
like to welcome Thomas E. Tabarani to the rank of Dispatchers. 

I am proud to inform you that Detective Robert E. Naughton has been 
highly decorated for his heroism during an armored car holdup at the Bay Bank 
on May 8, 1991. Bob's actions on that day were more than heroic, it was an 
act of courage, strength, humility, selfless determination, and a love for 
people. 

On that day, two masked men jumped from a car and stuck a shot gun into 
the neck of a guard who was unloading money. Detective Naughton cleared some 
civilians from the sidewalk and ordered the men to drop their guns. Subject 
number one withdrew the shotgun from the guard's neck and leveled it at 
Detective Naughton. This split second is the time frame that Judges and 
Juries have weeks to look at and decide if the policeman did right. This is 
the split second that flashes through a policeman's mind forever. Bob opened 
fire and both men dropped to the street and threw down their guns. This 
single-handed disarming and arresting of two dangerous felons proves his 
dedication to the residents of Medfield. His actions earned him the Medal of 
Honor from the New England Police Chief's Association, and the Medal of Valor 
from the Massachusetts Patrolmen's Association. Needless to say, we are all 
very proud of Bob. He is a credit to himself, his department and to his 
f ami ly. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Hurley, 
CHIEF OF POLICE 



32 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 
STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 19 91 ARE AS FOLLOWS 



Accident reports 

Ambulance trips 

Arrests 

Arson 

Assistance to citizens 

Automobiles 

reported stolen 

recovered 

citations 
Breaking and Entering 
Burglar alarms answered 
Bomb scares 

Civil matters and family problems 
Disturbances 

Doors and windows found unlocked or open 
Persons held in protective custody 
Funeral escorts 

Investigations of miscellaneous complaints 
Larceny 

Lost children reported 
Lost children found by Police 
Malicious destruction of property 
Mischievous acts 

Missing persons from State Hospital 
Missing patients located by Police 
Missing persons reported 
Missing persons located 
Messages delivered 
Sudden deaths investigated 
Suspicious vehicles 
Suspicious persons 
Suspicious or annoying calls 
Assaults 
Hazardous calls 
Animal Control calls 
Deer killed by vehicles 



206 

387 

91 

1 

525 

2 

8 

696 

26 

661 

1 

105 

325 

82 

11 

24 

1,572 

105 

3 

3 

28 

48 

40 

30 

26 

26 

28 

9 

47 

44 

105 

11 

237 

222 

29 




Detective Robert E. Naughton displays 
one of his medals. 



33 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Chief of the Fire Department for the 
year ending December 31, 1991. 

In January, Lt. George DeVenanzi retired after 43 years of dedicated 

service to the Department. His presence on the fireground will be missed, and 

we wish him we 1 1 in his retirement. In September, three new members were 

appointed to the Department. They are: David Bento, Mario Ippoliti, and 
Peter Mitchell. 

Training for all members has been conducted throughout the year. In 
addition to Department training exercises, many members attended classes given 
by the State Fire Academy. In the Spring of this year, we hosted a multi-town 
Mutual Aid drill including the towns of Mi 1 1 is, Dover, Norfolk, Sherborn, and 
Holliston. The drill was conducted to familiarize area towns with the concept 
of shuttling water. The drill was very successful and more of these drills 
are being planned. 

This year we installed F. E.I.N. This is a Fire and Emergency Television 
Network which sends training programs via satellite to the station. This is 
a welcome addition to our training program. 

At the Annual Town Meeting, funds were appropriated to enter into a 5 

year lease/purchase agreement to purchase a new engine. This engine will 

replace Engine 2 which has been in service for 30 years. The new piece is 
expected to be delivered in the Spring of 1992. 

In fiscal 1993, I will be seeking funds to purchase an Air 

Filling/Purification System. This would enable us to fill our own S.C.B.A. 

air tanks, making them more readily available. We presently take them to 
neighboring towns to be filled. 

Our responses for the year have been around 300, which seems to be the 
average over the last few years. Included in this total were 43 responses to 
Medfield State Hospital. 

Inspections and fire drills were conducted at the Medvale Nursing Home, 
pre-schools, schools and other buildings, both public and private, throughout 
the year. 

In closing I would like to thank the officers and members of the 
department for their continued support, outstanding service and dedication to 
the town. I would also like to thank our volunteer dispatcher Fred Rogers, 
and all the other town officials and personnel for their help and cooperation 
throughout the year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Kingsbury 
FIRE CHIEF 



34 



SERVICES RENDERED FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1991 



ALARMS 




Accidental 


71 


Box 


159 


False 


3 


Still 


129 


Home 


21 


SERVICES 




Ambulance Assist 


4 


Appliances 


16 


Bomb Scares 


1 


Brush and Grass 


14 


Burners Oi I 


3 


Gas 





Chimneys 


1 


Details 


5 


Dumpsters 


1 


Electrical 


17 


Fuel Spills 


8 


Investigations 


74 


Motor Vehicles 


7 


M/V Accidents 


14 


M/Aid Rendered 


9 


Received 


2 


Reports to Fire Marshal 


15 


Responses to Medfield State Hospital 


43 


Station Duty 


1 


Structures 


9 


PUBLIC ASSISTANCE 




Lock Outs 


4 


Pumping Cellars 


2 


Water Problems 


3 


INSPECTIONS 




Blasting 


74 


Fire Prevention 


46 


Fuel Storage 


21 


New Residential 


30 


Smoke Detectors New 


30 


Resale 


145 


Oil Burners 


7 


Tank Truck 


2 


Woodstoves 


4 


PERMITS ISSUED 




Blasting 


15 


Bonfire 


1 


Burning 


721 


Fuel Storage 


21 


Fire Alarm Inst/Alt 


2 


Propane Storage 


20 


Powder Storage 


11 


Sprinkler Inst/Alt 


8 


Tank Truck 


2 


U/Tank Removal 


13 


W/Oil Heaters 


2 



35 



AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Emergency Medical Technicians of the Medfield Ambulance responded to 
387 calls in 1991. This is a vast increase over the past years with 360 in 
1991, 371 in 1989, 338 in 1988 and 351 in 1987. We would like to say thank 
the people for the support we received all during the year. We would like to 
say thanks for another year of dedication and excellence given by our 
voluntary EMTs and to the Paramedics from Norwood and Leonard Morse Hospitals. 

Paul Cutler and Pete Smith resigned this year, but we welcomed back 
Barbara Soujanen and Bruce Rieth. Joseph Cavanaugh and Chip Newman joined our 
ranks of volunteers. 



Destination of trips is as follows: 



Leonard Morse Hospital 201 

Glover Memorial Hospital 32 

Norwood Hospital 89 

Newton Wellesley Hospital 10 

Brigham & Women's Hospital 4 

Mass General Hospital 1 

Southwood Hospital 2 

Framingham Union Hospital 10 

West Roxbury VA Hospital 1 

Arbor Hospital 1 

Beth Israel Hospital 1 

Mutual Aid 5 

Cancelled runs EMTs responded to 30 



Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Hurley 
CHIEF OF POLICE 




Wm 

m 


■ 




Firefighter George DeVananzi is honored 
by Selectmen upon his retirement. 



36 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During this fiscal year, the Council on Aging has provided services to 
Medfield seniors and their families. Many seniors and others are disappointed 
that Medfield does not provide services that they have become accustomed to in 
other places, such as an all-day drop in center, day trips, and transportation 
to facilities or health care providers outside of Medfield. 

Our "Bus for Us" provides transportation in Medfield on Monday thru 
Friday, and two out of town mall trips each month. 

We continue to sponsor free blood pressure and health clinics twice each 
month provided by the Walpole Visiting Nurse Association, a podiatry clinic 
monthly, (with a $10.00 charge), and this year we added a free glaucoma and 
cataract examination. Our annual free flu clinic was held on November 14th 
and served 247 seniors and others. This clinic was also provided by the 
Walpole Visiting Nurse Association to whom we are indebted and express our 
appreciation. 

We offer painting, crafts, and exercise classes on a regular basis for a 
nominal fee of $2.00 per class. 

Our HESSCO daily lunch program continues to draw about twenty 
participants daily. Although they are required to pay $1.50 per meal, there 
is no charge for enjoying each others company. Additionally about 25 meals 
are delivered daily thru our "Meals on Wheels" program to homebound people. 
Thank you to all the volunteers who deliver the meals and for your 
faithfulness and support. 

We conducted the Government surplus food distribution program in Medfield 
on a quarterly basis. Town citizens who are economically duressed qualify. 
While we are receiving less food, we are seeing more people, which is not 
unexpected in rough times. 

Despite a 3.9% budget cut, we were able to maintain services to our 
seniors thru a Formula Grant from the state of $2,085. (which helped defray 
the costs of our teachers and newsletter expenses). FOSI (Friends of Seniors, 
Inc.) paid for the extra hours for our bus driver that were not covered by our 
budget. We say thanks and amen, respectively. 

The Medfield Lions Club again sponsored their annual much anticipated 
summer chicken barbecue for the seniors. At Christmas, the Lions, the 
American Legion, the Sportsmen Club, and FOSI all combined to create a 
wonderful party at the American Legion Hall complete with a roast beef dinner, 
gifts, and great entertainment. All of this at no charge! 

One of the best things that happened to us in 1991 was a very generous 
gift from the Medfield Women's Association which allowed us to buy a beautiful 
television set and VCR. It is providing us with many hours of enjoyment. 



37 



All and all, it was a very successful year. None of this could have been 
accomplished without our faithful volunteers that helped in the kitchen, 
delivering meals, running the clinics, visiting shut-ins, collating and typing 
the newsletter, and driving people to medical appointments when they needed 
it. To all of you, our heartfelt thanks! 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ben Korbley, Chairman 

Barbara J. Connors, Executive Director 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my report for the year ending December 31, 1991. 

All barns and livestock have been inspected and pass the requirements of 
the Town of Medfield and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In one case, 
where the barn did not meet the standards set by the Town and the 
Commonwealth, a warning was issued and improvements were promised. All other 
animals and barns are in the best condition. 

The following animals were counted in Medfield in 1991: 



Beef Cows 


8 


Beef heifers 


2 


Donkeys 


2 


Goats 


1 


Horses 


69 


Ponies 


6 


Poultry 




Chickens 


105 


Ducks 


5 


Sheep 


28 


Number of Poultry Flocks 


2 



During 1991 the number of dog bites almost doubled over such incidents 
reported in 1990. There were 16 dog bites in Medfield this year, each one 
requiring a minimum ten-day quarantine of the animal. The Town's reduction of 
Animal Control coverage was a significant factor in this increase. 

I appreciate the continuing support and cooperation of the Town and the 
residents of Medfield in making my job so varied and interesting. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jennifer Shaw Verrochi 

Animal Inspector 

Assistant Animal Control Officer 



38 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Board of Appeals acted on the following applications during 1991. 

GRANTED: Comprehensive Permit for low and moderate income housing 
Special permit for temporary amusement - a circus 
Extension of special permit for Open Space Zoning 
Special Permit to allow an injection well system 
Special permit for a dentist's office 
Special permit for a home occupation 
Two findings/special permits to allow construction that will 

not be more nonconforming 
Two variances to allow extension of homes 
Four requests to withdraw application 

DENIED: One variance for reconfiguration of lot lines 
One request to rescind prior decision 

The Appeals Board would like to give its sincere thanks for all the 
support and consideration it has received this past year from the Town Boards 
and the residents of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert F. Sylvia, Chairman 
Burgess P. Standley, Secretary 
Ralph C. Good, Jr., Member 
Sandra G. Munsey, Associate 
Charles H. Peck, Associate 
Kenneth M. Chi Ids, Jr., Associate 




Norma Matczak not only works for the Board 

of Appeals and Planning Board, but she is 

also an Emergency Medical Technician. 



39 



COUNCIL ON ARTS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Council on Arts presented several major artistic events 
during the year 1991. The Zullo Gallery, a nonprofit art gallery began by the 
Arts Council, held its fourth season and Arts Council members participated in 
the staging of three children's plays and began work on a dramatic production. 

The Zullo Gallery went in a new direction this year by having local 
businesses sponsor arts competitions. The first arts competition was 
sponsored by Air Incorporated. The winning artist was awarded a $2,000 
commission to recreate her entry into a wall-sized mural of a landscape with 
waterfall along the Charles River. The waterfall runs prominently near the 
Company's headquarters. 

The annual juried competition continued to be one of the Gallery's most 
popular and successful shows. Over 70 artists entered the third annual 
competition from which 33 works were chosen. The show was comprised of a wide 
variety of mediums and subjects - from traditional to abstract. 

Two local artists were featured in the 21st exhibit for the Gallery, 
entitled "New Works by Steven Luecke and Linda Storm". Steven Luecke is one 
of the most highly regarded artists to exhibit at the Gallery, having sold a 
number of paintings including several commissions. Linda Storm, a Medfield 
resident and graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, had previously 
presented her work in the Gallery's initial exhibit in October 1988. 

Earlier in the year, a three women show featured multinational works with 
political and feminist themes by Josette Borg, Varteni and Carol Conchar. 

"Paintings from the late 19th and early 20th Century" kicked off the 1991 
Gallery season. The show included work by Medfield resident J.S. Monks, among 
other notable painters of the period and was organized by Medfield resident 
art dealer Bert Rosengarten. 

The Gallery presented poetry readings for the first time, organized by 
Gallery Committee member Susan B. Hunt, and a second workshop with Dean Minor 
was also successfully held in 1991. 

In May 1991, a benefit musical performance was sponsored by the Zullo 
Gallery. A "Night of Music", featured classic and popular music performed by 
pianist Brian McGorrill and soprano Cheryl Weiss at the Unitarian Church in 
Medfield. 

The Medfield Council on Arts was also active in promoting theatrical 
productions in Medfield. The Toy Box Players, a youth theatre group, 
presented three shows this summer geared to younger audiences. "Many Moons" 
was held in Zullo Gallery, "Annabel Broom, the Unhappy Witch" was performed at 
Medfield High School, and "The Noodle Doodle Box" was held outdoors on 
Medfield Day. The Medfield Council on Arts helped to fund and produce the 
shows and directed one production. 

The Medfield Council on Arts also collaborated with the Medfield High 
School Theatre Society in the production "Lovers" held in June 1991. 

At the end of the year, the Arts Council's own Theatre Club began work on 
the dramatic production, "Strange Snow", to be held at the Medfield High 
School on January 31 and February 1, 1992. 



40 



The Massachusetts Art Lottery allocated funds to each town which help to 
support the arts and humanities. Awards granted by Medfield this year were: 

Medfield Art Lottery Council. $1,000.00. To continue the operation of 
the Council's Zullo Gallery. 

Medfield Memorial Public Library. $100.00. Singer/Storyteller Performance 

Medfield Park and Recreation. $1200.00. Free outdoor summer concert. 

Regina O'Connor. $300.00. Three Children's Theatrical Performances. 

Medfield Community Chorus. $1200.00. Annual November Concert. 

The Council on Arts wishes to thank the Town of Medfield and its citizens 
for continuing to support our efforts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marie Zack Nolan, Chairperson 

Martha Moon, Treasurer 

Mary Ann Hatem, Secretary 

Lucinda Davis, PASS Coordinator 

Connie Jones, Publicity 

Timothy Ryan 

Laura Howick 

Wendy Clarridge 

Jeffrey Masters 

Rosalie Shirley 

William Pope 

Frances Iafolla 

Gordon T. Jackson 



41 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Most of Fiscal 1992 was spent implementing major state legislation. The 
first, adopted by Annual Town Meeting, authorized the Town to issue quarterly 
tax bills. The intent of this law was to provide early revenue to forestall 
short term borrowing in anticipation of funds to pay town bills. It also 
provided for early investment of income into interest bearing accounts. 
Although interest rates declined from the legislature's passage of the bill, 
Medfield's financial officers considered it advantageous when the small added 
expense of printing and mailing four sets of bills instead of two was compared 
to the benefits. 

A media campaign, using local newspapers and Cable 8 TV, educated 
taxpayers on the revised billing procedure and a smooth transition had been 
achieved when the first quarter bill was mailed July 1. 

Secondly, it was again time to complete the triennial revaluation 
mandated by state statute. Since this included interior inspections of most 
homes, the quarterly billing program provided extra time to set new values 
without delaying receipts. The first actual bill was mailed December 27. 

The bad news was, a decline in market values talked about by taxpayers 

for the previous three years, actually became fact. By early 1991 we 

witnessed an 11% decrease in sales prices. The Town valuation for 1992 was 
$91,579,863 less than in fiscal 1991. 

Human nature being what it is, many taxpayers who had been complaining 
when the decline had not been reflected now began to complain because it had. 
Many thought values less than their mortgages would hurt their chances for 
equity loans and for sales. Of course, there still were some who complained 
about high values. 

The Board thanks the Medfield Suburban Press for printing the values free 
of charge and mailing copies to all households. We also wish to thank our 
appraisal consultant Stan Bergeron and staff assistants Marjorie Temple and 
Irene Hart ling for closely monitoring sales over the interim revaluation 
period and for patiently responding to all the questions and complaints 
regarding revaluation and a rate increase. 

Representatives from the Board and its staff attend seminars and 
workshops throughout the year to learn how to implement new legislation and be 
aware of revisions in order to do our jobs more efficiently. 

As soon as values were certified by the Department of Revenue, Selectmen 
voted to maintain a single tax rate for all classes of property. Bills with 
total property values were used since detailed data was available in the 
office. The $14.16 rate was an increase of two dollars over last year. 
Unfortunately most bills increased regardless of valuation decreases. 



42 



. , ■s ll "srtfM£rj& Jtst stba. '5-332: 

any loss in state receipts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William D. Walsh, Chairman 
Clara E. Doub, Clerk 
Carol A. Rossi 




Stan Bergeron, our Real Estate appraisal 
consultant. 



43 



CABLE TELEVISION COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

SUMMARY 

The Cable TV Highlights for the past year included: 

1. As of January 1, 1991, the price of Basic Service was left 
unchanged, but Full Basic Service increased by $2.00/month to 
$19.95/month. Premium channels also increased $1.00/month. 

2. Picture quality and service on the Subscriber Network continued 
to be very good with very few customer complaints. 

3. Major progress in wiring the Junior High School as part of the 
institutional Network was made. 

4. Our Bob Gibbs received Cablevision's Volunteer Man of the Year 
Award. 

SUBSCRIBER NETWORK 

There was another annual price increase January 1, 1991, as follows: 

1990 1991 

Basic $ 

Full Basic 

Premium 

Sportschannel 

NESN 

Bravo 9.95 FREE 

(as part of Full Basic) 

* On May 1, 1991 NESN/SC Pkg. $ 22.90 $ 17.95 

These rate increases prompted many complaints with the undersigned making 
a presentation to the Selectmen on January 8, 1991 detailing the increases 
over the life of the present contract. See the attached charts, as presented. 
In a nutshell, there is nothing we can do in this monopolistic environment 
until either Congress changes the laws or more competition arrives to provide 
video signals to our homes such as the telephone or satellite companies. 

Stephen Grossman became General Manager of Cablevision in this area, and 
the change was a welcome relief. Cooperation has much improved. 

PUBLIC ACCESS CHANNELS 

Several outages occurred during the year, some at inopportune times, e.g. 
live telecast of an important school board meeting. This was later traced to 
a faulty connector in one of the floor cables. Cablevision's response to all 
outages of the Public Access Network was outstanding. 








8.95 


No Change 


17.95 


$ 19.95 


9.95 


10.95 


10.95 


11.45* 


10.95 


11.45* 



44 



A meeting with Steve Grossman, GM at Cablevision, verified our estimate 
of funding still available for studio equipment and repair at approximately 
$75,000. 

A procedure was established by which this Cable TV Committee would serve 
as the interface between the Public Access Corporation and Cablevision, 
providing the needed technical expertise to insure the proper equipment is 
ordered to satisfy their needs. 

INSTITUTIONAL NETWORK (1-NET) 

Wiring of this network which interconnects various schools and other town 
facilities, made major progress this year thanks to countless hours donated by 
Bob Gibbs of this committee in the planning and supervision of the project. 
School personnel can now make use of many educational programs provided by the 
Satellite Networks. 

OPEN ITEMS 

Continue wiring of various schools on largely volunteer basis. 

Begin replacing Public Access Studio equipment which is now showing its 



age. 



Respectfully submitted, 

William F. Kean, Chairman 
Bob Gibbs, Vice Chairman 
C.B. Doub, Secretary 
Michael Sullivan 
Scott Youlden, Cable 8 




Attorney Charles Fuller, Jr. even offered 
his services as Cable T.V. cameraman. 



45 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



The Commission is pleased to report its activities for the year ending 
December, 1991. 

During the year of 1991, we saw the continuation of the development on 
the Bridge Street Section of the cemetery. Drainage was installed, and lots 
were marked out on the upper area. We are prepared to open the new area and 
start burials in 1992. 

There were 42 Burials, 16 Cremations and 27 Lots were sold. 

The commission would like to thank the various town departments, as well 
as the Norfolk County Engineers for their assistance in the development of the 
cemetery. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Eric W. O'Brien, Chairman 
David McCue, Clerk 
Walter Reynolds 




Vine Lake Cemetery Pond 



46 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Civil Defense Director for the year 
ending December 31 , 1991. 

The Civil Defense Director's responsibilities are to act as a liaison 
between the Selectmen and the Town Departments in the event of a declared 
emergency. As of 1988, the Civil Defense Director has actively participated 
in the HAZMAT Emergency Planning Committee in and outside of the town. 

The Civil Defense Director is also in charge of the Auxiliary Police 
organization under the Chief of Police. 

In addition to our compulsory drills on July 4th and Halloween, the 
Auxiliary Police and Radio operators were requested to assist in the following 
events during 1991: 

- Memorial Day Parade 

- Annual Road Race 

- Medfield Day (MEMO) 

- Christmas Parade 

- Rocky Woods Reservation Bicentennial 

In addition to the above, the department was called upon to provide 
emergency assistance during Hurricane Bob in August of 1991. A shelter was 
setup and manned throughout the storm; a radio communications link with the 
Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA)* was established and 
maintained; and assistance was provided to the police department. Manpower 
and emergency vehicles were used in the patrol of the town, damage assessment, 
and traffic control. 

I wish to remind the people of Medfield that in an emergency it is 
possible to arrange for shelter and showers at one of the schools. 

Town residents interested in making use of our Civil Defense services or 
in membership should contact the Civil Defense Director at 359-4519. 

I would like to thank the men and women of the Auxiliary Police for their 
cooperation throughout the year. Also, I wish to thank the Board of 
Selectmen, Michael Sullivan and his staff, and Police Chief Hurley. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Vincent M. Cellucci 
CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 



* Formerly known as Massachusetts Civil Defense Agency (MCDA) 



47 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Conservation Commission administers the Massachusetts Wetland 
Protection Act, Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 131, sec. 40, and the Medfield Wetlands 
Bylaw. Anyone proposing to alter in any way a wetland or land subject to 
flooding, or to perform work within 100 feet of either, must file with the 
Commission either a Request for a Determination of Applicability or a Notice 
of Intent and before starting the work must receive either a determination 
that the act is not applicable or an order of conditions (a detailed permit). 
The Order of Conditions must be recorded and imposes a lien on the property. 
When the work has been completed satisfactorily under an order of conditions, 
the commission may vote to issue a certificate of compliance. 

In 1991, the commission reviewed the following projects and issued the 
type of document indicated: 

Orders of Conditions: 

1. Hoover Realty Trust, Woodcliff Estates, Lots 5 (Land Court No. 73), 
6 (72), 7 (71), 8 (70), 9 (69), 10 (68), and 13 (57), Pederzini 
Drive. 

2. Ralph Costello, Kingsbury Estates, Lots 2, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, Spring 
Street. 

3. Brisson Design & Development, 21 Philip Street. 

4. Medfield Public Schools, new playing fields, Medfield High School. 

5. John and Suzanne Reardon, 7 Pilgrim Lane. 

6. Oxbow Realty Inc., Overfield Estates, Lot P-2R, Pine Street. 

7. James and Barbara Kilcommons, Village Way, Lot 3. 

9. George J. Yered and Robert H. Keleher, 11 West Mill Street. 
Extensions of Time under Orders of Conditions: 

10. George J. Yered and Robert H. Keleher, 11 West Mill Street. 

11. Oxbow Realty, Inc., Overfield Estates, Pine Street, Lot P-9R. 

12. Southern Acres Realty Trust, South Street Extension, east and west 
sides, and small area of Spring Street. 

13. Paul Borelli, The Meadows (2: water main; subdivision). 
Certificates of Compliance: 

14. Palumbo, Vincent and Muriel, Lots 62 and 63, Harding Street. 

15. Town of Medfield, sewer project between North and Pine Streets. 

16. Bronson and Susan Goddard, Tallwoods Subdivision, Lot 3, 4 Tallwoods 
Drive. 



48 



17. Hoover Realty Trust, Woodcliff Estates, Pederzini Drive, Lots 6 
(72), 8 (70), and 13 (57). 

18. Bn'sson Design & Development, 21 Philip Street. 

19. 420 Corporation, (partial), Lots 2-5, 7-13, Lot 6 Bishop Road, Lot 
R2, Lot 2B (portion). 

20. Oxbow Realty, Inc., Overfield Estates, Pine Street, (partial): Lots 
N-25. N-27, N-28, N-29, N-30, and N-31. 

The Commission spent considerable time in 1991 thoroughly revising its 
standard Order of Conditions to afford greater protection to Medfield's water 
resources. For the same reason, at the end of 1991 we began a complete 
revision of Medfield's Wetlands Bylaw. The proposed new bylaw should appear 
on the warrant for the annual Town Meeting in the spring of 1992. 

The Commission added a new member and a new associate member in 1991. We 
welcome applications from residents interested in helping to preserve wetlands 
and to educate the public about their critical importance, especially persons 
with backgrounds in hydrology, geology, civil engineering, biology, 
environmental science, or law, or those interested in helping with clerical 
and other administrative matters, including inspecting sites for compliance 
with our Orders of Conditions or for possible violations of the Act. 

The Commission meets in the Town House the first and third Thursday of 
each month at 7:30 P.M. and on other dates when necessary. 

Resepctfully submitted, 

Craig S. Harwood, Chairman 

Caroline D. Stand ley, Vice Chairman 

Denise Yurkofsky, Secretary 

Scott D. Pitz, Treasurer 

Lee Howell 

Douglas S. Sparrow 

John Thompson 

Theresa A. Cos, Associate Member 

Betty A. Kaerwer, Associate Member 

James G. White, Jr., Associate Member 




Conservation Commission Members 
Theresa A. Cos and Betty A. Kaerwer 



49 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The calendar year of 1991 again showed continuing growth in the workload 

for the Board of Health agents, staff members and our contracting agencies. 

Complicated repairs of septic systems constructed prior to Title 5 and new 

requirements of Title 5 found our consulting agent/engineer spending more time 

supplying information and on consulting services. Our Sanitary Inspector 

likewise supplied many hours of consulting services to prospective business 
developers of food service establishments. 

SANITATION: 

John J. Keefe R.S. has served as Board of Health agent for seventeen 
years. As agent for the board, he made 163 inspections of food service 
establishments and retail food stores and gave consultation and advice to 46 
requests and investigated 5 food related complaints. Twenty consultations 
were held by Mr. Keefe dealing with various public health issues with school, 
highway, town administrative, police and fire personnel and State Hospital 
personnel throughout the year. 

Under the provision of Chapter II of the State Sanitary Code covering 
minimum standards for human habitation, Mr. Keefe made 21 inspections of 
dwelling units during the year which resulted from complaints and random 
inspections of rental housing. Where violations of the State Sanitary Code 
were found, the owner or occupant was ordered to take corrective action and 
follow-up inspections were made to insure compliance. Mr. Keefe also made 126 
miscellaneous inspections which included the public bathing beach, semi public 
pools, laundromats, gas stations, shopping centers, the landfill and the 
transfer station. Eighteen regular inspections of school cafeterias and 
nursery schools were carried out throughout the year. Total inspections and 
consultations during 1991 were 423. The following is a listing of related 
permits issued: 

BOARD OF HEALTH PERMITS ISSUED: 

Restaurants, counter bars, cafeteria food 

service and vending machines 19 

Food stores and markets 10 

Temporary food service permits 10 

Bakeries 2 

Laundromats 2 

Funeral Director 1 

Tanning Facilities 1 

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING: 

As the town continues to experience growth and the number of residences 
increases, the load on our environment increases. Recognizing this, the Board 
of Health has been active in cooperation with other boards and committees, 
stressing the need for proper management of the town's natural resources, 
particularly, the protection of our water resources. With this as a 
priority, the board adopted Regulations for Storm Water and Runoff Management, 
which are intended to protect the public and environmental health by providing 
adequate protection against pollutants, flooding, siltation, and other 
drainage problems. 



50 



Our agent and consulting professional engineer, William R. Domey, has 
provided engineering assistance to town residents and reviewed plans for 
future development. With storm water management regulations in effect, 
reviews of subdivision plans, plans for septic system designs for new 
construction, proposals for repairs of existing systems and drainage details 
for site plan review afford a greater protection of the environment. Such 
reviews constitute some of the many services rendered by the board engineer. 
Engineering consulting services were also provided by the board engineer to 
the Allendale Housing project as well as to investigating potential pollutant 
problems to private wells in town following discovery of problems in 
neighboring towns. 

The following is a list of number of reviews and inspections and related 
permits issued: 

On-site soil tests 51 

New plan reviews 41 

Disposal Works Construction Permit 9 

Construction inspections 61 

Repair permits issued 7 

Installers' permits issued 20 
Subdivision plan reviews ( 2 plans) 

(Preliminary & Definitive) 

Well permits issued 2 
Septage Handler & Carters' permits issued 16 

Swimming pool reviews (private pools) 9 
Review of plans for additions & renovations 59 

Review of septic system repair plans 21 

Sewerage complaints and investigations were conducted throughout the 
year, compliance orders were issued, hearings were held for variances to 
Title 5 and meetings with related town boards relative to review of decisions 
affecting the public health constituted additional services of Mr. Domey. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

Jennifer Shaw Verrochi, the town's Animal Inspector continues her 
dedicated service. Her report is contained separately in this Town Report. 
Permits for horses, animals and for stables for 1991 totaled 21 and 1 permit 
was issued for a Veterinary Clinic. 

CONTRACTS WITH HUMAN SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEMS 

The South Norfolk County Association for Retarded Citizens, SNCARC has 
been serving the community of Medfield since 1954 and has been financially 
supported with a donation from Medfield since 1972. Services to Medfield 
residents provided directly by the Association include: Family Support and 
Advocacy; Community- Based Respite Care; and Social-Recreational Programs. 
Services to Medfield residents, provided through LIFEWORKS are supported by 
the Association and include: Vocational Training and Job Placement Programs; 
Day Habilitation/Prevocational Programs; and Residential Programs. Two 
Medfield residents receive Residential Services, 6 residents are involved in 
Vocational Training, one in Day Habi litation, 9 in Social/Recreational 
programs, one in family support and 14 Respite Care services were provided to 
Medfield families. 



51 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

The Walpole Area Visiting Nurse Association serves the Board of Health in 
the capacity of public health nursing services for the residents of Medfield. 
This agency has experienced a 35% growth in overall visits in 1991. The 
clinical staff has increased accordingly with therapy staff and home health 
aide services to meet patient needs . In addition to established services, 
UAVNA increased its offerings of childbirth education classes, breast-feeding 
classes, prenatal and postnatal exercise classes, and cholesterol screenings. 
A new class, Infant/Toddler Safety and CPR has been added and is popular with 
new parents. Office hours are held daily at the Walpole, 55 West Street, 
office. A new Mental Health Program was started in November, offering 
psychiatric nursing care to clients with mental health problems who are having 
difficulty coping and are unable to access existing services. WAVNA continues 
to provide programs in Health Promotion in addition to traditional home health 
services. The four major components of the Health Promotion Program are: 
Health Maintenance for the elderly; Maternal/Child Health; Communicable 
Disease and Public Health. 

The Town of Medfield Public Health Statistics for 1991 are as follows: 

SERVICE 



Home Visits/Health Maintenance 

Maternal/Child Health Visits 

Office Visits 

Communicable Disease Fol low-Up 

Senior Citizen Clinics 

Flu Clinic 

OUTREACH PROGRAM 

The Medfield Youth Outreach program, administered by the Board of Health 
and advised by the Outreach Advisory Committee, continues to be a program 
supported by the town. The focus of the Outreach position as traditionally 
been and remains crisis intervention and prevention, short and some long term 
counseling, information and referrals, community and client liaison, advocacy, 
and the Peer Counseling/Leadership program. The confidential services are 
offered free of charge to Medfield youth and their families. Elizabeth Newton 
completed her first year as director of the program in October. New program 
development in 1991 included working with the police department and the 
schools to improve the Juvenile Diversion program, establishing an Alateen 
meeting in Medfield, and a new Cable 8 show "Youth Connection" 

In 1991, clients were referred to the Outreach office by the schools 
(38%), police (19%), courts (4%), family members (9%), self (20%), and other 
sources (10%) including clergy, local professionals, and state agencies. In 
most cases concerning minor children, parents or other family members became 
involved in meetings. Consultation with school personnel, police, other 
service providers, and community agencies also occurred. Major issues dealt 
with throughout the calendar year included: 



VISITS 


VISITS 


1991 


1990 


156 


201 


20 


19 


38 


53 


9 


5 


191 


282 


255 


238 



fami ly difficulties social adjustment 

parenting issues possible eviction 

substance abuse issues teenage pregnancy 

financial difficulties CHINS court cases 



52 



physical and sexual abuse homelessness 
aggressiveness juvenile delinquency 

self esteem issues unemployment 

divorce/separation hunger (family) 

The Peer Counseling program continues to be a success. Students are 
trained to provide assistance, support and improved listening skills for peers 
in town. After training, Peer Counselors are available to help orientate all 
new students to the high school, including the freshmen class and to work with 
younger students on a "Big Buddy" capacity. The Outreach worker is 
responsible for recruiting and selecting all Peer Counselors, developing and 
administering all training and meetings and has overall supervision of the 
program consulting with individual Peer Counselors as they work with their 
"clients". The Outreach worker also shares equal responsibility in leading 
the Peer Leadership program which involves the Peer Counselors and Peer 
Educators (a drug and alcohol program in the high school). 

The Outreach worker participates in a number of organizations on a 
regular basis including: Association of Municipal Administrators of Youth and 
Family Services (AMAYFS), Medfield Drug and Alcohol Advisory Council, Youth 
Advisory Committee, and the Medfield Home Committee. Clinical supervision is 
provided by-monthly by Dimension House counselor, Thomas Hughart. 

The Outreach office is located on the upper second floor of the Town 
Hall. The telephone number is 359-7121 and messages may be left 24 hours a 
day. Informational brochures on a variety of issues are available at the 
office. 

The Board of Health holds its meetings on the first Wednesday and the 
third Monday evening of the month at 6:30 P.M. on the second floor of Town 
Hall. These meetings are open to the public and citizens are invited to 
attend and participate. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joan F. Willgohs, Chairman 
Heidi Groff, Clerk 
Neil D. MacKenzie 



53 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Historical Commission submits herewith its nineteenth Annual 
Report for the calendar year 1991. 

As the Massachusetts Preservation Planning Manual states, the Historical 
Commission is an agent of local government and is directed to plan and 
implement programs for the "identification, evaluation, and protection of the 
community's historic resources." In carrying out this directive, the 
Commission has again this year found itself involved in programs both old and 
new which should benefit the town now and in the future. Among the ongoing 
programs are an updated Historic Trail (walking tour) Brochure, Historic 
Preservation Awards Program, Historic Signs Program, and the Medfield Day 
Program. New programs include a reexamination of the Commission's goals with 
an eye towards instituting a Town Archives for the orderly collection and 
preservation of town records and artifacts, beginning the preliminary studies 
necessary for the writing of a town master preservation plan, and 
investigating the feasibility of instituting a demolition ordinance to prevent 
the town's loss of further architectural assets such as the late Curtis House 
found only a few years ago at the corner of Frairy and North Streets. 

Historic Trai I Brochure 

Mr. Standley has been instrumental in advancing this program this year. 
In order for the brochure to be produced at the lowest cost to the town, he 
has rewritten much of the old copy himself and has reset the type on his 
personal computer. The new photographs have been made, and the finished 
product should be ready in time for town's residents to enjoy the tour on a 
fine spring morning. Until then, a small supply of the old brochures remains 
avai I able. 

Historic Preservation Award 

This year the town was fortunate to have an especially sensitive 
restoration to which to award the Preservation Plaque. Mr. and Mrs. Robin 
Adair, new friends who came from England and Ohio respectively, have restored 
the house at 115 North Street. Both love and largess have been poured into 
the finished work, and the result is a treasure. A house that might easily 
have been lost, as was the Curtis House, has been saved. Glance at the house 
as you go up North Street. It's just opposite the police and fire station. 

Medfield Day 

The Commission again had a booth at Medfield Day. This year the booth 
was shared with the Kingsbury Grist Mill Committee, and the town's new John 
Metcalf Historic District Commission. The turnout was rewarding as was the 
sharing of information with town residents. Many came by to offer support and 
inquire about the various programs. A further benefit was the sharing of 
information among the members of the various commissions and also between them 
and the members of the Medfield Historical Society at their nearby booth. 
Medfield Day remains one of the prime ways in which the Commission 
communicates with the residents and notifies them of the services and benefits 
offered to all townspeople. 



54 



Town Archives 

The Historical Commission, in keeping with the mandate of the enabling 
legislation, has begun exploring ways in which it may help to better preserve 
and protect the town's historical assets. For many years the Medfield 
Historical Society, a private charitable organization, has done outstanding 
work in collecting and preserving the older documents and artifacts. We are 
exploring ways in which the Commission may work with them to expand this work. 
We have met with a representative of the Society and heard of its current 
work. We also plan to investigate what other towns are doing in this area. 
Whether the Commission can best serve as a conduit of materials and documents 
to the Society or as an independent archivist is an issue yet to be resolved. 
This field promises to be interesting and fruitful in the future. 

Master Preservation Planning 

The state recommends that each community formulate a Master Preservation 
Plan. "A Preservation Plan is a formal document that analyzes the 
preservation issues confronting a community and presents recommendations for 
the resolution of those issues." Such a plan is a statement of our goals. 
The state recommends that the plan contain some or all of the following 
elements: 

-a summary history of the growth and development of the community; 

-an analysis of all of the architectural styles represented in the 
community; 

-a survey of the significant structures and areas in the community; 

- map of cultural resources surveyed; 

-a statement of the Commissions preservation policy and overall 
objectives; 

-recommendations for preservation measures for specific properties 
or areas; 

-identification of funding sources (these might include 
Massachusetts Preservation Projects Fund grants, Housing and Urban 
Development Block Grant funds, National Endowment for the Arts 
grants, and Architectural Conservation Trust for the Arts grants, 
and Architectural Conservation Trust for Massachusetts revolving 
fund assistance); 

-recommendations for the integration of preservation goals and 
objectives into the community planning process. 



In this, the Commission is aware that there are many interests to be 
balanced. The taxpayer, the developer, the homeowner, the businessperson, 
future generations, and many others must be considered and protected. The 
strong feelings and serious conflicts possible here make this an area in which 
early and dispassionate planning can benefit all. We are thus presented with 
a great opportunity to do good. 



55 



D emo I i t i on Ordinance 

As we look back into our town's history, we can see that we are the 
fortunate beneficiaries of those who have been the good stewards of our 
architectural treasures. We can also see that we have had some less worthy 
agents. Some have been forced by economics to sacrifice our heritage; others 
have simply been unaware of what they were doing. Probably none were 
malicious, none meant to deprive their descendants of the past. 

A good demolition ordinance can keep us from making the same 
mistakes. The Commission is mindful that such an ordinance must also balance 
interests both economic and social. We are now in the preliminary stage of 
simply investigating the actions of other towns in this. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Donald J. MacDonald, Chairman 

Paul E. Nyren, Treasurer 

David F. Temple, Secretary 

Burgess P. Standley 

John Hooper 

Eleanor Anes, Associate Member 

Richard P. DeSorgher, Associate Member 

David L. Wilmarth, Associate Member 




I 



Historical Commission Chairman MacDonald 
presenting the Preservation plaque to 
Mr. Robin Adair for their restoration of 
115 North Street. 



56 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL DISTRICT COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Historical District Commission submits herewith its 
Report for the calendar year 1991. 



Annua I 



There has been no construction or renovation activity in the John Metcalf 
Historical District during the year. However, the Commission has met several 
times and is now beginning to consider other areas of the town for which 
inclusion in the District might be an appropriate next step. Since the 
various areas of the District need not be contiguous all areas of town are 
eligible for inclusion. In the year, members of the Commission have contacted 
property owners in various parts of town seeking to find those expressing an 
interest in the District. Several have been identified, and the Commission 
members are exploring with them the implications of inclusion within the 
District. 

The Commission welcomes anyone wishing to avail him or herself of the 
protections afforded by the District. Interested persons may contact any 
Commission member or the Town House for information about this service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Donald J. MacDonald, Chairman 
John Hooper, Vice Chairman 
Stephen M. Nolan, Secretary 
Paul E. Nyren, Treasurer 




Selectman Thompson presenting Robert J. Mannino 
with certificate of appreciation for serving on 
Historical Commission, Historic District Commi- 
sion and Kingsbury Pond Committee. 



57 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Housing Authority is pleased to submit its Annual Report for 

1991. 

The Authority is authorized by and operates under the provisions of 

Chapter 1 21 B of the Massachusetts General Laws. It is entirely funded through 

the Executive Office of Communities and Development and is responsible to EOCD 
for the management of low income housing. 

Many energy conservation measures were implemented during the year 
through the generosity of Boston Edison. Insulation and weather-stripping 
were added to all units. Interior and exterior lighting was changed. 

For information and/or application for housing at Tilden Village, please 
contact the Executive Director, Marie K. Roberts, at 359-6454 Monday through 
Thursday mornings. 

In September, State Appointee Cecilia M. Haney who had faithfully served 
on the Housing Authority for five years completed her term of office and 
continued to serve until a new appointment was made. Her dedication and 
genuine concern regarding housing issues is gratefully acknowledged and 
appreciated. Valerie Mariani was appointed to a five year term by Secretary 
Mary Padula as State Member. 

The Medfield Housing Authority regularly meets on the third Monday of 
each month at 7:30 P.M. in the office at Tilden Village, 30 Pound Street. The 
general public is welcome to attend these meetings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Jordan, Chairman 
L. Paul Galante, Jr., Vice Chairman 
Mary Ellen Thompson, Treasurer 
Diane Nightingale, Secretary 
Valerie Mariani, State Member 



58 



DEPARTMENT 


PERMITS 


INSPECTIONS 




1990 


1991 


1990 


1991 


BUILDING 


257 


209 


905 


1077 


PLUMBING 


114 


144 


117 


199 


GAS 


105 


217 


69 


125 


WIRING 


231 


192 


540 


394 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending December 31 , 1991: 

INCOME EXPENSES 

1990 1991 1990 1991 

$26,907 $36,270 $14,286 $19,661 

5,238 7,151 2,140 3,659 

2,648 3,245 1,300 1,694 

8,990 11,292 8,550 6,955 

Total revenue from the issuance of permits and fees for inspections for 

the calendar year 1991 was $57,958 as compared to $43,783 in 1990. Expenses 
for 1991 were $31,969 as compared to $26,276 in 1990. 

BUILDING INSPECTION 

A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 

New single family dwellings 26 

Complete partially finished single dwellings 3 

Additions to private dwellings 48 

Renovations to private dwellings 44 

Additions and renovations to business and industrial buildings 22 

New industrial/business buildings 

Fami ly Apartments 

2 Fami ly Apartments 

Reshingling roof and installation of sidewalls 20 

Private swimming pools 12 

Accessory bui Idings 5 

Residential garages 2 

Demolitions 2 

Tents (temporary) and Construction trailers 3 

Signs 9 

Stoves (solid fuel burning/chimneys) 12 

Carnival 1 

TOTAL 209 

Occupancy certificates were issued for 21 new residences in 1991 as 
compared to 28 in 1990. 

Inspections for certification of business, schools, multifamily 
dwellings, nursing homes and nursery schools amounted to 41 inspections for 
1991. 



59 



Estimated construction costs on permits issued: 

1990 1991 

New Dwellings $4,025,000 $4,500,000 

Renovations and additions, pools, 

shingling, sidewalls, etc. on residential 2,168,376 1,656,329 

New construction business and industry -0- -0- 

Renovations and additions business and 

industry 405,762 755,564 

Multi family buildings -0- -0- 

2 Family Dwellings 195,000 -0- 

Family apartments 50,000 -0- 

Enforcement of the State Building Code continues to be the responsibility 
of the local building inspectors. The office of the Inspection Department 
keeps an accurate registration of builders holding State Construction 
Supervisor's licenses in order to assure compliance with Section 109.1.1 of 
the code. The building inspectors continue the enforcement of the code by 
making inspections of schools, churches and rest homes as well as other places 
of assembly on periodic basis. 

The Inspector of Buildings also serves the town in the capacity of 
Enforcing Officer for Zoning and as such made 47 inspections to investigate 
complaints and inquiries brought to his attention both by residents as well as 
other town board and departments. 

The assistance and cooperation of Fire Chief Kingsbury during inspections 
was greatly appreciated. The Fire Chief and the Inspectors continue to 
inspect smoke detectors in new construction and in additions and renovations 
as well as inspecting the installation of solid fuel burning appliances. 
Residents are reminded of the importance of having their wood stove 
installations inspected and certified in accordance with requirements of the 
Massachusetts State Building Code. 

PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 

The purpose of the position of the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is to 
administer, investigate and enforce the Uniform State Plumbing Code and State 
Fuel Gas Code. Unlike other trades, homeowners cannot be issued plumbing or 
gas permits. They can only be issued to a licensed Journeyman or a Master 
Plumber. Plumbing or gas cannot be installed, altered, removed, replaced, or 
repaired until a permit has been issued by the Inspector of Plumbing or Gas. 
The inspection department will be glad to help you make the determination 
concerning the need for plumbing and gas permits. When a citizen of the town 
requests the plumber or gas fitter to apply for a permit, he is getting the 
assurance that the installation will not only be installed correctly and 
safely, but also that the work will be installed by a professional and not 
exploited by non professionals. It is definitely in the homeowners interest 
to insist on inspections by qualified town inspectors knowledgeable in their 
trade. It is money well spent in times where every penny counts. All 
inspectors are issued Medfield Photo Identification Cards, remember to ask 
them for their ID before allowing them to enter your home. 

The Plumbing Code is constantly being changed and upgraded to try to give 
the consumer and the plumber a direction that will assure a safe installation. 
Of great concern lately is the installation of backflow prevention devices 
where necessary to insure the continuance of the good clean potable water of 
which we are very proud in Medfield. 



60 



WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the Massachusetts Electric Code 
as well as the National Electric Code in his inspections of electric 
installations for which permits are issued. Residents are reminded that the 
permitting process is in effect to assure safe and correct installations. The 
inspectors spend many hours giving answers to questions and advice to 
homeowners relative to electrical work. The assistance of Tauno Aalto and 
James Leonard during the periodic absences of the Wiring Inspector was greatly 
appreciated. 

Administrative Assistant Mae Otting and secretary Judy Cahill, have been 
extremely valuable not only to the inspectors, but also the citizens of the 
Town in processing and coordinating the necessary inspectors. Thank you to 
both. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. O'Toole, Inspector of Buildings 
Anthony Calo, Local Inspector of Buildings 
Joseph F. Erskine, Inspector of Wires 
John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is my annual report for the fiscal year of 1991. 

The following Scales, Weights, Liquid Measuring meters and linear 
measures were sealed: 

Balances and Scales 44 

Weights 129 

Liquid Measuring Meters 51 

Linear Measures 7 

A total of 231 inspections, for 19 establishments, were sealed for 1991. 
Revenue for the department was $2,895.20. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Patricia A. Rioux 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



61 



KINGSBURY POND COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

On April 10, 1991 the Kingsbury Pond Committee met with Mr. Don Perham, 
millwright, of Bolton, MA. It was agreed that Mr. Perham would be engaged to 
do restoration work on the grist mill, and he has been working off and on all 
summer and fall. After an inspection of the mill he informed the committee 
that the mill had, indeed, once been powered by an overshot waterwheel which 
was located below the floor level of the mill, not on the outside. Of the 
present structure, the left, lower building is the mill. Over the years 
changes have been made in the structural framing, many of them probably at the 
time the turbine was installed. Now five large 16" x 16" white oak timbers 
have been delivered to the mill for new beams and supports. Mr. Perham has 
installed two 16-foot north/south timbers, cut supporting uprights to length 
and cut tenons to fit original mortises in the upper beams. Returning to the 
old style framing will create space for a waterwheel if at some time in the 
future such should be desired. The turbine will be moved to one side. For 
the present restoration it is planned to operate the mill with the rebuilt 
turbine. 

Work parties were held on Saturday mornings, well attended by committee 
members and volunteers. Work was also carried on during the week and even 
some evenings. An attractive construction sign was erected to advise 
passersby of the restoration project and that donations would be welcome. 
When the job is completed, the sign will come down, and an approved historic 
marker put up. Activities over the year included clearing the lower floor of 
the mill of miscellaneous junk; digging silt, mud and weeds from the tailrace; 
moving large, loose rocks from the interior face of the dam. Also included 
were excavating below the interior face of the dam; digging out the turbine 
and unbolting the flanged shaft connection; placing and replacing support 
cribbing and jacking up stones and timbers; and laying up a large stone pier. 
A large stone slab has been set over the tailrace as a bridge. The four 
windows that had been in the mill (broken and boarded up) were repaired, 
glazed, painted and installed. Six miscellaneous old windows were obtained 
and roughly fastened into the framed openings. Although they are not of 
proper design or fit they let in necessary light. It was three of these 
temporary windows which were broken in the latest vandalism episode. The ten 
heavy wire window protective covers were repaired, painted, and replaced on 
the lower and ground floor windows. All the trim was scraped, primed and 
given one coat of red paint. When the time comes for finishing touches to the 
building at least eight period windows will be required, plus a modern 
protective system. A new oak cover over the sluice intake was constructed 
and put in place by the Town. 

In November, a new 3- inch thick oak frame was installed on the front of 
the concrete sluice. Yes, in order to do this most of the water was released 
from the pond. Even so, there was plenty left so that in one 10-hour day some 
committee members and Mr. Perham had to struggle down in the mud and cold 
water to bolt the sides and crosspieces into place. The new frame had been 
pre-fabbed by a committee member. A temporary cover (gate) was placed over 
the intake, but hopefully the new gate will soon be in place. Such a gate is 
necessary for two reasons. First, of course, to control the flow of water 
through the sluice to the turbine; second, to provide a means of lowering the 
water level. (Apparently it was custom (or requirement) in the early days to 
drain a mill pond once a year). The present concrete box/pipe overflow 
controls only the height of water; it contains no way to lower the water. 
Also, in conjunction with the pond, there are three leaks (at least) in the 



62 



dam: one at each end, but the third of potential severity is in direct line 
with the mill building. Repair of this carries a high priority. 

Over the summer whenever the mill was open with Mr. Perham and/or 
committee member(s) at work, visitors would stop to see what was going on. 
Open House was held on Medfield Day. The Committee again shared a booth with 
the Medfield Historical Commission where there was a photo display and a small 
pamphlet about the mill was available. The 8th grade history classes came to 
the mill on two days in November to see a bit of Medfield past and learn 
something about the reason for and the operation of a grist mill. 

The appreciation of the Committee is extended to those who made monetary 
contributions; to the donors of a top millstone which had been dug up on the 
land of one of the oldest houses in Town and which is now installed in front 
of the mill; to those volunteers who came to share their time and effort 
working on the project. A special vote of thanks to the Medfield Public Works 
Department without whose cooperation, expertise, and equipment the heavy jobs 
would have been very, very difficult to accomplish. 

There is, of course, much more to be done on pond, mill and grounds, but 
the Committee feels that good progress has been made and, with the cooperation 
of all concerned, will continue to be made. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul Nyren, Chairman 

Michael Sullivan, Treasurer 

Barbara Leighton, Secretary 

Michael Cronin 

Donald MacDonald 

Richard Ostrander 

Paul Simpson 

Thompson Lingel, Associate Member 




Barbara Leighton is an avid member on th< 
Kingsbury Pond Committee. 



63 




Framing new sluice gate at Kingsbury Grist 
Mill - Kingsbury Pond Committee and others 




John Gag I i am" and Paul Nyren preparing to 
shingle roof at Kingsbury Grist Mill. 



64 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



Metropolitan Area Planning Council provided staff support to the TRIC 
(Three Rivers Interlocal Council) subregion, of which Medfield is a member. 
TRIC's 1991 accomplishments include the identification of over 5 # 000 potential 
commuter parking spaces; a recommendation from the Central Transportation 
Planning Staff to fund a Route 1 Corridor Planning Study from Dean St. in 
Norwood to the Dedham/Boston line; input into MAPC's Land Resources Protection 
Plan; and the endorsement of the subregional transportation priorities. 

The town of Medfield also benefited from MAPC's mapping of municipals 
facilities in the greater Metro West area to further joint service 
initiatives; coordination and review of the Transportation Improvement 
Program; facilitation of discussions and public input to the amendments to the 
State Implementation Plan for Air Quality; attending on behalf of member 
communities, all PMT (Program for Mass Transportation) meetings; production of 
the Neponset Basin Water Supply Plan, an inventory and mapping of water supply 
sources and wellhead protection areas; introduction of the Pavement Management 
Program; and coordination of the review and input to "A Strategic Metropolitan 
Transportation System" as part of MetroPlan 2000. 

MetroPlan 2000 continuing efforts included development of the 
Transportation Land Resources and Housing Elements with input by the 
subregions and policy committees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret E. Bancroft 
Medfield' s Representative 



wmmm. 




Selectman Pritoni, Barbara Lodge, Jane Hayes, and 
Susan Lei st of the Open Space Planning Committee 
presenting their new trails map. 



65 



MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Clearly 1991 was a difficult year as the town struggled to maintain 
services with diminished funds. It was with great regret that the Library 
Board was forced to close the Library on Wednesdays due to budget limitations. 
Many citizens expressed dismay with the decision and feel reopening the 
Library should be a top priority in the coming year. 

The resources of the Library continue to be heavily used as 1991 
witnessed a 7% increase in circulation. The 101,873 items borrowed was a 
record high. The increased demand for materials makes it imperative that 
adequate funding be allocated for purchasing new materials to keep the 
collection up to date in constantly changing subject areas such as science, 
technology and medicine. Vast changes also occurred on the political scene in 
1991 which will necessitate updating the history, geography, travel and atlas 
sections that cover the newly emerging nations. 

Nonfiction videos were added to the collection for the first time this 
year as more publishers began using this medium to communicate information. 
Videos on home repair, hobbies, travel, sports, and gardening have proved to 
be extremely popular. The books on tape collection has been expanded to keep 
up with demand, and a six month exchange of tapes with another Minuteman 
library has brought additional titles to our collection at no cost. 

Our membership in the Minuteman Library Network will soon bring another 
valuable service to residents. Access to current information contained in 
over 1,000 periodicals will become readily available by dialing in on the 
terminals in our library to a central periodical database using subject, key 
word, author, or title entry. Over 700 business journals as well as consumer, 
medical, scientific, technical and general periodicals will be indexed. 
Copies of desired articles will be fax to our library within 48 hours. 

The Children's Room continued to be an active place. Five preschool 
programs were held weekly during the school year and special programs for 
school age children were offered on weekends and during vacations. A dinosaur 
and fossil program capped an extremely busy summer season, while a 
professional storyteller and singer performed at a harvest oriented program 
during Children's Book Week in November. Circulation of children's materials 
reached an all-time high during 1991 with over 37,000 items borrowed. The in- 
creased demand for children's services, which in part is a result of growth in 
population in this age group, means the town should look at funding the 
Children's Librarian as a full time position rather than 25 hours per week. 

A Long Range Planning Committee was appointed by the Trustees to study 
current and future needs of the Library particularly in relation to the 
increasing availability of electronic sources of information and networking of 
libraries. In addition to Library Trustees and staff, six citizens are 
serving on the Committee to bring broader representation. A random sample 
survey is planned in order to obtain input from the community. 

The Friends of the Library again played an extremely important role in 
expanding Library services and materials. Through their efforts, additional 
programs were provided for children, many books were purchased, the nonfiction 
video collection was initiated, equipment for a second workstation at the 
circulation desk was funded, and museum passes were made available. Grateful 
appreciation is extended to those who serve on the Friends' Board, to those 
who help at the book sales, and to the many individual citizens who support 



66 



the Friends through membership. 

In closing, I would like to take this opportunity to sincerely thank the 
Library staff who have done an outstanding job during difficult times. 
Closing the Library on Wednesdays meant it was busier than ever on the 
remaining days the Library was open. To further complicate matters, the staff 
had to learn to use a new computer system, because Minuteman changed software 
vendors during the year. In spite of the strain, the staff is to be 
complemented for their ever cheerful manner and the competence with which they 
provide service. 

Finally, I wish to thank to Board of Trustees for their strong leadership 
on financial matters, for their expertise on the Long Range Planning 
Committee; for their hard work in the establishment of the Library Endowment 
Fund; and for their dedicated efforts to improve the quality of library 
service for the citizens of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Jane B. Archer 
Library Director 



ANNUAL LIBRARY STATISTICS 
New Acquisitions 2,582 Total Materials Owned 
Active Card Holders 6,131 Total Circulation 



39,443 
101,873 




Children's Librarian, Connie Jones, Roseanne Parker 
Library Director Jane Archer, and Virginia Murley 



67 



TRUSTEES OF THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

In order to address future needs of the Library, the Trustees appointed a 
Long Range Planning Committee. The members are as follows: Ms. Bettye Kozel 
and Mr. Mike West representing the Library Trustees; Ms. Alison Piper, the 
Friends; Ms. Gay D'Amaro, the School Committee; Mr. Richard DeSorgher, 
Teachers; Mr. Fred Temple and Mr. David Stephenson, Citizens-at- large; Ms. 
Elizabeth Sherwood, Students; and Ms. Jane Archer, the Library. The Trustees 
recognize with the deepest gratification these public-spirited individuals' 
service for the public good. 

It was another banner year for the Public Library in terms of 
circulation, which for the first time in the history of the Library, topped 
100,000. Our dedicated Library staff are to be commended for their 
extraordinary and impressive dedication to excellence in service to the people 
of the Town. They have produced outstanding public service under trying 
conditions. 

In the past three years circulation has increased by a phenomenal sixteen 
percent while staffing has decreased by an uncustomary thirty-one percent. 
The Trustees, with good reason, remain deeply concerned about the inverse 
staffing and use problem. 

Budget reduction has also led to another retrenchment in hours of library 
service this year. In response to Town Meeting's action on the FY92 library 
budget, the Trustees, who volunteer for public service, were--with the 
greatest of reservation- -forced to close the Library on Wednesdays beginning 
July 1, 1991. As a volunteer board representing the interest of Medfield 
residents in library affairs, the Trustees reluctantly took this action. 

Citizen response to the Wednesday closing was swift and intense. Some 
sample comments about the Library closing are: 

"A library should be the central focus of any community and the very 
last aspect of community life to be limited by budget cuts." 

"Our library, as our schools, are integral parts of the quality of 
life we sought in Medfield." 

"Our society is regressing rapidly. Access to books is basic." 

"I am a senior citizen and depend on the library. It is a great 
blow to me that it will be closed on Wednesdays." 

"It 's time to get our priorities straight. Sure is sending a 
negative message to students (sic)." 

The Trustees are troubled by the fact that the Library budget, in 
comparison to other towns our size in the state, is disproportionately funded. 
Medfield spent .93 percent (less than one percent) of its town budget on 
library services, while other towns in the Commonwealth on average spend 1.4 
percent of the town's budget for library services. 



68 



During difficult times, one expects more use of the town library. 
Support for a town library is often a barometer of the value that a town 
places on quality of life. The state has unfortuantely labeled Medfield as 
disadvantaged in its support of library services to its citizens. 

A number of positive events, despite budget limitations, transpired this 
year. The Trustees acknowledge graciously and warmly the extraordinary 
support that the Library receives from the Friends of the Library. They have 
been extremely generous. Every Friend of the Library is an invaluable asset. 

The Trustees and Friends jointly provided leadership for the creation of 
a permanent endowment fund, styled "The Library Trust Fund of Medfield" in 
order to encourage charitable gifts- -both inter vivos and testamentary- -for 
the purchase of library materials . Yield from the Trust is specifically 
earmarked to supplement, not replace, funds appropriated annually by the Town 
in support for the Library. The first one thousand dollars for the Fund was 
given at the conclusion of the 1991 Town Meeting by a generous donor who saw 
the immediate needs of the library. 

Looking to the future- -the library is an educational, recreational, 
informational, and cultural resource, and it needs to be open on Wednesday, 
notably in a town that seeks a higher quality of life. Additionally, the size 
of the collection is small compared on a per capita basis with other towns our 
size and especially with other Minuteman towns. The Trustees, in line with 
their agreement with the Minuteman towns, will continue to channel as many 
funds as possible into the book collection, especially state aid and endowment 
funds. Medfield, while its collection numbers approximately 37,000, has 
access to over one million volumes in the Minuteman system. This is a real 
bonanza to the people of Medfield. 

The Trustees are moving affirmatively to reopen the library on Wednesday 
and perhaps other times as funds become available. Moreover, the Trustees 
welcome the opportunity to work cooperatively and constructively with sister 
boards and departments to achieve the goal of a higher quality of life in 
Medfield. 

Respectively submitted, 

Dr. James C. Baughman, Chairman 
Ms. Bettye Kozel, Vice-Chairman 
Mr. David Allan, Bill Signer 
Mr. Richard Fitzpatrick 
Ms. Maura McNicholas 
Mr. Michael West 




Collectors Nancy Griffin and Claire Devasto 

are also collecting donations for the 

gazebo on the town common. 

69 




Garden Club member Elizabeth Moore planting 
the perenniel garden in our new town common. 




Stonemason Steve Wallace and John Horgan 
setting new benches in place. 



70 



MEMORIAL DAY ADDRESS 

May 20, 1991 

Given by Richard P. DeSorgher 

In July of 1776, 27 year old Jabez Boyden of South Street, after serving 
briefly in the siege of Boston at Dorchester Heights, left Medfield to enlist 
in the Continental Army. He marched to Ft. Ticonderoga to help reinforce the 
Continental Army there, which was retreating from Quebec after suffering a 
devastating defeat by the British. There on September 9, 1776, Jabez Boyden 
died, after less than two months of service. His body lies today in an 
unmarked grave outside Ft. Ticonderoga, far from his boyhood home of Medfield. 

During the Civil War, sixty-seven Medfield men volunteered to fight in 
that great war. Of that number, thirteen were killed in battle or died of 
wounds or disease, and of the thirteen who died, seven lie today in unknown 
graves, some of them buried hastily on the battle field, or possibly in the 
turmoil and confusion of battle, they were left unburied where they fell and 
the bodies irrecoverably lost. To the memory and honor of those seven men, 
this parade will shortly stop at the memorial erected in the section of 
Vinelake Cemetery known as " Little Round Top." That memorial bears the 
following names: 

Caleb Howard He was the first to be mustered into service. In the 
summer and fall of 1864, Howard took part in the attack upon Richmond. Day 
and night they lay in the trenches without shelter of any kind. They fought 
on, week-after-week with little gain or loss on either side. On the 30th of 
September, 1864 while hotly engaged with the enemy, Caleb Howard fell mortally 
wounded, and died a few hours later. He lies today somewhere in the Virginia 
countryside. 

Daniel McMahon enlisted when he was but 19 years of age. During 
the battle at Lookout Mountain, while serving on picket duty, McMahon was cut 
down by confederate bullets. He lies in an unmarked grave on Lookout Mountain 
in Tennessee. 

Wi 1 1 iam R. Holbrook While fighting in Averysboro, North Carolina 
against troops of the Confederate Army General Joe Johnston, was shot through 
the head by a rebel sharp shooter, and he was buried in that North Carolina 
field. 

William Vennoh While marching from Virginia into Pennsylvania, just 
before the battle of Gettysburg fell into the hands of the enemy, he died in 
captivity in Libby Prison. 

Frank E. Morse A native Medfield boy was killed at Deep Run, 
Virginia on August 15, 1864, just two weeks shy of the end of his term of 
service. 

Joseph Hardy Was the oldest of the Medfield volunteers, being 42 
years old when he enlisted. He died of swamp fever at Carol Iton, Louisiana on 
October 9, 1863 and lies today near that Louisiana Swamp. 

Gabriel Strang Enlisted September 21, 1861 near the start of the 
war in the 1st Massachusetts Calvary. He was killed at High Bridge, Virginia 
on April 6, 1865, just 3 days before the surrender of General Robert E. Lee. 



71 



Those Medfield men who lie in unknown graves and the others who lie in 
marked graves, fought and then died that the life of this nation might be 
preserved. 

Succeeding generations from Medfield have also given the ultimate 
sacrifice in U.W. I, U.W. II, Korea, and Vietnam. 

Medfield is of course but a tiny fraction of the United States and the 
number of those who died from Medfield is but a tiny fraction of those who 
gave their lives from across this country. 

So many lives, over so many wars, so many have sacrificed so much. From 
Lexington and Concord to Gettysburg and Fredricksburg, from Manila Harbor to 
San Juan Hill, from the Argonne Forest to Dunkirk, from Omaha Beach to Saipan, 
from Inchon to the Yalu River, from Cam Ranh Bay to the Mekong River Delta, 
and from Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, to the desert sands of Iraq. These people 
have given their lives and time must never, never be permitted to steal from 
our nation's memory what these brave Americans did, the bravery, the devotion, 
the sacrifice! 

Their memory and their deeds like the meaning of Memorial Day itself, 
must never be forgotten or reduced in importance. 

If Americans in the future, are again asked to make such sacrifices, how 
will they remember and find inspiration from a past if it is forgotten. The 
passage of time is a frightening phenomenon. Names and places, dates and 
events that were supposed to live forever in human kinds memory are now 
forgotten. A half century ago when much of the world was at war, 
Spanish-American War veterans were then about the age of many W.W. II veterans 
right now. The Spanish-American War Veterans are now gone, W.W. 1 1 Veterans 
are passing from our time, but we must never, never, let them pass from our 
memory. Let these men and women of W.W. II be remembered and memorialized for 
the next generation. Let what they did be remembered and commented upon and 
explained. Let today and tomorrow's kids understand that today's older folks 
who fought in W.W. II managed as kids themselves to save this world from 
destruction. 

Memorial Day must not become lost in the shuffle of the 3-day vacation. 
In our nation's history two holidays have profound impact, one the 4th of July 
for celebrating and the other Memorial Day for remembering. 

As time marches on, we must not forget those who have fought and died in 
the defense of our way of life. 

It is important that we in Medfield, and we in the United States, keep 
the names and deeds alive. It is high time that our Congressmen and Senators 
support a bill again, putting Memorial Day back on the permanent date of May 
the 30th, so that it will always have the recognition and place of remembrance 
that it so deserves. 

Five days ago, I and fellow teachers, stood at the Tomb of the Unknown 
Soldier with 100, 8th grade students, and then walked passed row after row, 
after row of graves at Arlington National Cemetery. They and all future 
generations must somehow experience and know about and remember the same type 
of awe and feeling, the same sense of bravery, sacrifice, and dedication that 
overcomes one walking through those silent hills at Arlington. We must pass 
this memory on , strengthened and reinforced, to those who shall come after us, 
and we must never, never forget! 



72 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Committee to Study Memorials is pleased to submit its third Annual 
Report. 

The Committee to Study Memorials with the backing of the Planning Board 
and the Board of Selectmen was able to have the following subdivision street 
names changed: 

1. Valley Road replaced Wampatuck Road 

2. Garrison Lane replaced Moccasin Lane 

3. Derby Lane replaced Hunters Close 

4. Powder House Road replaced Parkview Street 

The Committee to Study Memorials began to take inventory of Medfield 
residents memorialized in squares, parks, athletic fields, etc. A partial 
list to date includes: 

1. Baxter Park - in memory of Rev. Joseph Baxter, Medfield's second 
minister, and in honor and recognition of the role generations of Baxters 
have played in Medfield # s history. The land was donated to the town in 
1916 with the request it be named Baxter Park (Square) 

2. Vincent Bravo Square - in memory and honor of Vincent Bravo, killed 
in World War II 

3. John P. Ross Square - in memory and honor of John P. Ross killed in 
World War II 

4. Clarence Cutler Square - in memory and honor of Clarence Cutler, 
killed following World War I 

5. Ocran G. Knehr Square - in memory and honor of Ocran Knehr, killed 
prior to the start of World War II 

6. Peter Panciocco Civic Square - in memory and recognition of Peter 
Panciocco, civic leader with youth involvement in little league, youth 
hockey, and the Hinkley Swim Pond 

7. Stephen Hinkley Memorial Park 

8. Stephen Hinkley Memorial Pond - in memory and honor of Stephen 
Hinkley, killed in the War in Vietnam 

9. Robert Belmont Track (at high school/middle school complex) - in 
memory, of former junior high school physical education teacher and high 
school track coach Robert Belmont 

10. Robert Capers Little League Field (at Metacomet Park) - in memory 
of former little league president Robert Capers 



73 



11. Calvin Fisher Field (at high school/middle school complex) in 
>ry of Calvin Fisher, Medfield High School graduate and athlete who 

grew up near the current field that bears his name and who was 
accidentally killed in his youth 

12. Fisher Room (at the Pfaff Center) - in memory of Calvin Fisher, 
early President of the Youth Center. The Youth Center was located in that 
building from the 1960's - 1980's 

13. William McCarthy Park (located across from the State Hospital) - 
in memory and recognition of war veteran, former selectman, and highway 
superintendent William McCarthy 

14. Pa I umbo Field - in honor and recognition of Vincent "Red" Pa I umbo 
and William Palumbo long time residents and civic and youth sports leaders 
and advocates. Field is located in McCarthy Park 

15. John Warren Field - in memory and recognition of John Warren, 
baseball coach and advocate. Field is located in McCarthy Park 

16. Robert H. Luke Room - (at the Pfaff Center) in memory and 
recognition of Robert H. Luke, long time Park and Recreation Commission 
member, founder of the Medfield Youth Center, and friend of youth. 

17. Duncan Watt Soccer Field (at Metacomet Park) - in memory and 
recognition of Duncan Watt, former youth soccer official, coach, and 
advocate 

18. Thomas A. Blake Middle School - in memory and recognition of 
Thomas A. Blake, former superintendent of public schools from 1957 to 1972 

19. Amos Clark Kingsbury High School - named at request of land owner 
Ella C. Marcionette who gave the land where the school was built as a gift 
to the town in memory of Amos Clark Kingsbury, life long Medfield resident, 
veteran, and civic leader 

20. Hannah Adams Pfaff Center - named after Hannah Adams Pfaff, former 
owner of the property whose family donated the property to the town with 
the request that any future buildings be named in her honor 

21. Memorial Public Library - named in memory of the wife and daughter 
of Granville F. Dai ley. Dai ley gave the library to the town in 1917 as a 
gift 

22. Memorial School - so named by vote of the 1953 Town Meeting as a 
World War II memorial. A bronze plaque listing those from Medfield who 
servrd in World War II is located inside 

23. Memorial Field (located at the Dale Street School/Memorial School 
complex) Dedicated in 1950 in memory of those from Medfield who died 

in service to their country 

24. McCormack Room (at the Pfaff Center) in memory of Shannon 
McCormack 1968-1987, in recognition of all sports programs in Medfield. 
Shannon McCormack was a Medfield High School student and athlete who died 
in her youth 



74 



25. William McCarthy Room (located in the Memorial Public Library) in 
memory of William McCarthy, war veteran, town historian, avid reader, 
former selectman, and highway department superintendent 

The Committee to Study Memorials sponsored and saw pass at town meeting 
articles #8 and #9 of the Annual Town Meeting naming town "Squares" in 
memory and honor of Peter Panciocco and Ocran Knehr and article #10 
designating the road in Vine Lake Cemetery, running from the flag pole 
towards Bridge Street, be named in memory and honor of Joseph Roberts, Jr. 

On Sunday, October 13, 1991 a crowd of over 200 townspeople assembled 
at the intersection of Elm and South Streets and Knollwood Road for the 
dedication of the Peter Panciocco Civic Square. Ceremony speakers included 
Rev. Kevin Crowley of St. Edwards, Selectman Ann Thompson, Little League 
President Jack Flynn, Youth Hockey President Dr. William Tosches, and former 
Park and Recreation Commission Chairman Robert Miller. Peter's unselfish 
involvement in little league, youth hockey and the Hinkley Memorial Swim 
Pond was noted. His ever-present smile and kind words, his optimism, his 
hard work and devotion will forever be embedded in the memory of those who 
crossed his path. Special thanks is given to Medfield Youth Hockey and 
Medfield Little League for their generous contributions towards the 
dedication ceremony. Speaking on behalf of the Panciocco family was their 
oldest son, John Panciocco. 

On Veterans Day, November 11, 1991, in an impressive ceremony held in 
the American Legion Hall, the intersection of Pine and North Streets was 
dedicated the "Ocran G. Knehr Square". The "Square" was dedicated in memory 
of Medfield native Ocran Knehr, who was killed in November of 1941 when his 
aircraft, which was returning from a mission, followed a radio signal into a 
sea cliff near Reykjavik, Iceland. All on board were killed. Ocran was a 
United States Navy Radio Operator on a PBM Flying Boat, based in Iceland 
during the time of our country's undeclared war with Germany in the North 
Atlantic. Knehr's aircraft carried bombs and machine guns. The mission was 
to bomb German submarines, strafe invading German troops, sea search and 
rescue, and gather intelligence. Ocran Knehr was buried here in Vine Lake 
Cemetery on December 7, 1941 with military honors. The bombing of Pearl 
Harbor was announced during the burial ceremony. Dedication speakers 
included Rev. Robert Wood, of the United Church of Christ, Selectman Ann 
Thompson, Beckwith Post 110 Commander Donald Mailing, Honorable Senator 
Christopher Lane and Honorable Representative Lida Harkins. Representing 
the Knehr family at the ceremony was Ocran's nephew Kevin Knehr and Ocran's 
only son, George Holloway, who only learned within the past year that Ocran 
was his father. Special thanks is given to Beckwith Post 110 and the 
American Legion members of Beckwith Post 110 for their generous 
contributions towards the dedication ceremony. 

The Committee is currently making plans at this writing to dedicate the 
roadway in Vine Lake Cemetery in memory and honor of Joseph A. Roberts, Jr., 
who served as cemetery commissioner from 1945 to 1980 and as a member of the 
Board of Selectman from 1954 to 1963. 



75 



The Committee to Study Memorials is also working with the cemetery 
commission to properly name and erect signs in Vine Lake Cemetery for the 
different streets. 

The Committee to Study Memorials will continue to work towards its goal 
of having a street, square, or park named after all those from Medfield 
killed in past wars and have this accomplished by the year 2000. We will 
also continue to keep in contact with the Planning Board and the Board of 
Selectmen on future subdivision plans. 

We wish to thank the Selectmen and the Planning Board for their support 
as well as the many residents and town boards and organizations who helped 
our committee plan the ceremony and dedicate both the Ocran G. Knehr Square 
and the Peter Panciocco Civic Square. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard P. DeSorgher 
Paul F. Curran 
Robert A. Kinsman 
David F. Temple 
Patricia I. Walsh 




Dedication of Ocran G. Knehr Square. 
(Photo courtesy of Suburban Press - D 



Rains) 



76 



MEDFIELD RESIDENTS AND RELATIVES WHO SERVED IN 
OPERATION DESERT SHIELD/ STORM 

1990 - 1991 



Cpl. David P. Amadei 

2nd LT. Glen Amnott 

1st LT. Craig Amnott 

PFC Christopher Antonopoulos 

2nd LT. Edward A. Barrows, Jr. 

GMC Timothy Clancy 

EM2 William J. Donovan 

PS2 Eric J. Doucette, COAST GUARD 

LT. JG. James T. Dumphy 

Capt. Patrick Dunne 

LT. Peter Hayes, USMC 

SFC Dwight D. Hood 

AFC Paul E. Kennally III 

Major Mark E. Vinson 



Pvt. Andrew Kelly 

Capt. Michael Ken's 

1st Sgt. Michael J. Kreger 

Capt. Richard McKnight 

Capt. Pamela Nourse 

SFC Charles Nutting 

1st LT. Erikson S. Nystrom 

Sgt. Christopher A. Riccard, SCGC 

S/Sgt. Gerald F. Rogers 

1st LT. Dan Rose 

1ST LT. Karl Schwartz 

PFC Eric T. Suereth 

Spec. Rhonda M. Suereth 

LCPL Colin N. Thompson 




EM2 William J. Donovan and family. 



77 



NORFOLK COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Operational Project Program integrates all proven technologies into a 
system of mosquito control that is rational, safe, effective, and economically 
feasible. 

All mosquito eggs need water to hatch to sustain larval growth. 

SOURCE REDUCTION WORK; 

Our primary efforts are concentrated on the drainage of shallow, standing, 
stagnant water, and the maintenance of existing flow systems which contribute 
to mosquito breeding sources. 

Drainage Ditches Cleaned 2,648 feet 

LARVICIDING: 

Treatment of mosquito larvae during aquatic development is the next most 
effective control effort. 

Larvicide by backpack/briquets/mi stblowers 153 acres 
Catch basin larvicide application 427 count 

ADULTICIDING: 

The suppression of flying adult mosquitoes becomes necessary when they are 
numerous, annoying, or threatening to residents. 

Adulticide with mistblowers 21 acres 

Adulticide U.L.V. from trucks 13,632 acres 

Surveys, inspections, and monitoring in support of our program include 
locating and mapping breeding areas, larval and adult collections, and field 
work evaluations leading to better drainage. 

The Project received 76 calls from residents for information and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John J. Smith, 
Superintendent 



78 



PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

1991 continued to be a very busy year for the Park and Recreation 
Commission. For those newcomers to town and those of you unfamiliar with the 
Commission, we are a five person board of elected volunteers. Properties in 
our jurisdiction include: Pfaff Center, Metacomet Park, Hinkley Swim Pond, 56 
Acres, Bakers Pond and Baxter Park. 

The year started off with our usual array of activity classes for adults 
and youth under the tireless direction of Margie Monahan. Enrollment this 
year was up by 43%. Various landscaping improvements and some much needed 
purchases were made for the Pfaff and the swim pond. A swing set was donated 
to the Pfaff grounds. Other winter activities included trips to see "Sesame 
Street Live" and the "Harlem Globetrotters" at the Providence Civic Center. 

Our first major fund-raising effort was a wonderful success. We 
sponsored The Boston Ballet II production of "Rumpelsti Itskin". This was held 
in April after over one year's worth of brainstorming, planning, organizing, 
advertising, selling and a myriad of other details were performed by a cast of 
energetic and enthusiastic volunteers under the coordination of Betsy 
Agrimanakis. Thank yous went out to the many private businesses and arts 
councils that also helped fund the event. 

A new community sign was purchased through funds raised from various 
programs and installed at Baxter Park. This has enabled us to promote current 
Park events. It is also available for other groups in town to use. Policies 
and procedures and forms for its use were drawn up and are available at town 
hall and the Pfaff Center. 

Unfortunately, the Pfaff Center continued to need many structural 
improvements. The roof now leaks in various places. Repairs and their 
coordination are still being investigated at time of this report. Screens 
were purchased for the windows. Painting of the inside of the building is 
still needed. New doors and fans are also essential. 

New playground equipment, phase two of the existing structure, was 
installed with the help again of our strong volunteers and the highway 
department. A piece of antiquated and dangerous equipment was removed. New 
grass and relocation of the gate to the playground was also accomplished later 
in the year. This park still needs landscaping. The Commission continues to 
investigate irrigation systems for the Park fields. 

Kindergarten soccer and T-ball both returned this year and proved to be 
an enjoyable learning experience for all the children as well as the adult 
volunteers involved. Mary Prelack and Claire O'Neil coordinated T-ball. 
Brian Scheld, Bill Hatten and Phil Boole organized soccer. For the older 
children, the John Smith Soccer Clinic came to Metacomet Park in June. 

The Commission hired a new tennis director, Dick Waterfall, to replace 
Beth Eby who left after many successful years. Once again, it turned out to 
be a great summer program with 382 registrations, culminating in an exciting 
end of season tournament for all participants. Adult lessons were also held 
in the summer and fall. For the first time, a group of Medfield players 
travelled to Sherborn for a match. Plans are underway for continued expansion 
of the summer tennis program. Due to budget cutbacks, lights and scheduling 
of the courts were almost a thing of the past until a group of avid players 
pooled together to pay for lights and schedule the courts. 



79 



Jean Todesca returned as Waterfront Director at the Hinkley Swim Pond. A 
record number of memberships were sold and attendance overall increased this 
summer. With the help of the Garden Club and Santucci Landscapers, new plants 
and a walkway enhanced the entrance to the area. Hundreds of hot and hungry 
residents came out for our annual "Fun Day" at the pond. Games and activities 
were organized by the energetic pond staff and food was cooked and served by 
the Park Commissioners. The swim team continued to grow and had a very 
successful year under the direction of coach Stephen Ruzzo. Improvements 
needed for the guard house were compiled; some were addressed in the fall and 
others are planned for winter '92 to get the pond ready for next year. The 
town was entertained again this year by singer, Tim McHale, who was back by 
popular request to give a concert at the pond. 

Creative Camp was held in July and August under the skilled direction of 
Margie Monahan and Elaine Gaubitz. A four-year old program was started this 
year and proved to be a lot of fun for this age group. 

Throughout the year, the commission has been formulating goals and 
priorities. As programs, property maintenance and residents' needs and 
interest in recreation continue to grow and budgets decrease, the demand on 
volunteers is at an all time high. The Pfaff Center is often packed to 
capacity with various classes, meetings and town functions. Senior citizens 
use the building on a daily basis. We are grateful for every ounce of time, 
energy, help and support given by volunteers. Unfortunately, only so much can 
be done before efficiency is lost and there is no time or people to address 
other, longer-term issues and needs. We are therefore currently investigating 
the possibility of hiring a part-time Director to take over many day to day 
responsibilities that need constant attention and coordination. This would 
put Medfield on par with most of our neighboring towns and enable the 
Commission to work towards enhancing the quality and quantity of programs, 
events and facilities for today as well as establish plans and policies for 
the future. 

A fall soccer program for kindergarten and first grade was successfully 
kicked-off this year. Also in the fall, new activity classes were added. The 
annual Halloween party featured pony rides, hayrides, fun, games and treats 
for all of the town's tricksters. Unicef boxes were also distributed. Many 
thanks to La Coupe Unique and the Donut Express for their support of this 
annual event. Thanks also to the girl scouts for assisting us throughout the 
day. 

Unfortunately, Michael Medina resigned from the commission in November 
for personal reasons. We are thankful for his contributions over the past 
three years. His presence is missed. Leanne Velichansky was elected to fill 
his seat. 

December was another busy month. In conjunction with the Mass Ski Club, 
we were able to send three bus loads of skiers on a trip to Loon Mountain in 
NH. Our second annual "Holiday Mini -Mai I" was held in December. This was a 
profitable as well as enjoyable, social evening for everyone as local 
businesses and crafts people showed off and sold their products. Plans were 
made for a February '92 bus trip to see "House at Pooh Corner" performed by 
the Boston Children's Theater. Future plans for middle school age children 
include shopping and ski trips. Additionally, the Commission hopes to 
organize night functions at the Pfaff Center for this age group. 



80 



The Park and Recreation Commission hopes to continue and expand programs, 
properties and recreational opportunities for the growing number of Medfield 
residents, both young and old. We will need to be more creative than ever 
before! We therefore are always open to ideas and feedback from the 
community. We remain indebted to our many volunteers and supporters; your 
endless efforts are appreciated immensely as without them, 
able to proceed and succeed with our goals. Thank you. 



we would not be 



Respectively submitted, 

John Monahan, Chairman 
Margaret Maider, Treasurer 
Leanne Velichansky 
Kathryn Violick-Boole, Secretary 
J. Gary Walsh 




Fun Day at the H ink ley Swim Pond. 



81 



PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

After 23 years of exceptional service to the Planning Board, Mildred E. 
Willis retired as Planning Board Administrator in June. The Board long relied 
on her comprehensive knowledge and understanding of planning matters and long 
enjoyed her capable and good humored presence, but now has welcomed in her 
place Norma Matczak, who has risen quickly to the challenges of the job. 

1991 was a year of relatively little development planning in Medfield, 
owing to the continuing recession and the fact that many approved streets (17) 
and lots (166) in a I ready- planned subdivisions remain undeveloped. However, 
building of streets and subdivision houses did continue through the year, 
especially on upper Pine Street (Chestnut Lane, Quail Run and Steeplechase 
Drive) and east Main Street (Pederzini Drive). 

The Planning Board approved one new plan: a definitive subdivision plan 
for Grist Mill Pond Estates (one street, 8 lots) off South Street. 

A total of 37 lots were released for building from two previously 
approved subdivisions. 

The endorsed 12 "approval -not- required" plans, creating 17 new lots along 
existing streets. 

No site plans were submitted to the Board. 

TOWN MEETING ACTIONS 

The Warrant Committee was pleased to be able to review- -and the Moderator 
to preside over the Board's sixteen (16) articles on the Town Meeting Warrant. 
The Town Meeting voted to adopt all the proposed changes to the Zoning Bylaw, 
many of which were minor clarifications, and other small but substantive 

changes: 

Expanding the definition of the Watershed Protection District; 

Imposing a height and story limit on industrial buildings; 

Regulating the location and development of Recycling Facilities; and 

Regulating temporary signs. 

A Planning Board article also proposed, and the Town Meeting approved, 
renaming the Master Plan Implementation Committee the "Long Range Planning 
Committee," and further defined their role in assisting the Planning Board and 
the Town with long range planning. 

The Town Meeting voted to accept Turner Hill Road and Sanders Way as 
public ways. 



82 



PLANNING BOARD APPOINTMENTS 

The Board appointed the following members to the Long Range Planning 
Committee: Charles H. DeBevoise, Joseph C. Donnelly and Daniel L. Jones for 
terms to expire June 28, 1994; Marjorie Temple, Geralyn M. Warren, and Denise 
Yurkofsky for terms to expire June 28, 1993; Patrick C. Gordon, Jeffrey 
Masters, and Martha L. Smick for terms to expire June 28, 1992. The Board 
regretted receiving the resignation of Connie S. Jones. Phil Bonanno was 
reappointed to the Sign Advisory Board. Joseph R. Parker was appointed 
Associate Member for Site Plan Review. 

LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE (LRPC) 

The Board was pleased to provide professional consulting assistance to 
the LRPC in their mission to carry out a new planning process focusing on the 
long range use of un- and underdeveloped land in the Town. We applaud the 
energy and dedication of this hard working committee, and look forward to 
town-wide participation in this planning venture in 1992. 

SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 

During 1991 the Sign Advisory Board continued to review applications for 
sign permits, to advise and assist sign applicants, and to recommend 
modifications of the Sign Bylaw. 
OTHER BUSINESS 

The Board proposed and voted to adopt several changes to the Subdivision 
Rules and Regulations, including a new "Secondary Residential Roadway" 
standard for short dead-end streets, the use of sloped granite street curbing 
instead of vertical curbing, and the use of slightly sharper curves on 
streets. (The changes will take effect in 1992.) 

Board members served on the Open Space Planning Committee, the Affordable 
Housing Committee and the Capital Budget Committee. 

The Board continued to use the engineering services of Whitman & Howard 
for subdivision review and street construction inspections. 

The Planning Board acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and 
assistance of other Town Boards and Departments, with special thanks to Town 
Counsel Charles Fuller, Jr., Superintendent of Public Works Kenneth Feeney, 
and Tree Warden Edward H ink ley. 

Planning Board meetings are held weekly on Mondays at 8 P.M. at the Town 
House and are open to the public. Appointments with the Board must be made by 
the Thursday noon prior to the meeting. Requests for information or 
appointments should be directed to the Planning Board Administrator, Norma 
Matczak, at the Town House. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret E. Bancroft, Chairman 
Daniel W. Nye, Vice Chairman 
John K. Gagliani, Secretary 
Mark G. Cerel 
Stephen M. Nolan 



83 



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85 




Mildred Willis with 1992 Planning Board Members, 
Stephen Nolan, Daniel Nye, Mark Cerel, John Gagliam 




Present and Past Board of Appeals and Planning Board. Rear: 
Daniel Nye, Richard McCul lough, Sarsfield Brennan, Joseph 
Parker, Mark Cerel, Joseph Codispoti. Front: Burgess Stanley, 
Robert Sylvia, Sandra Munsey, Mildred Willis, Bay Bancroft, 
John Gagliani, Kenneth Chi Ids. 



X6 



RECYCLING COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Recycling Committee, appointed by the Board of Selectmen, is 
charged with assisting in the implementation of recycling in Medfield and 
educating the public about Medfield' s recycling program. In 1991, the 
Recycling Committee made significant progress toward its goals through its 
work on mandatory recycling regulations, its involvement with the Mi His 
Recycling Consortium and its comprehensive community outreach program. 

Although data for years before 1991 are not complete, information 
supplied by Medfield's Department of Public Works indicates that Medfield 
residents increased substantially their recycling efforts during 1991. The 
cost savings from those efforts are significant, as indicated below: 

1 9 9 1 



Recyclable 
Material 


Tons Recycled 


Revenue Generated 


(estimated) 
Incineration & 
Transportation 
Costs Saved 


(estimated) 
Revenue Plus 
Costs Saved 


Paper 


417 


$ -0- 




$27,622.00 


$27,622/08 


Glass 


102 


345.45 




7,470.48 


7,815.93 


"White" 
Metals 


296 


5,920.00 




-o- r/ 


5,920.00 


Metal Cans 


10.6 


-0- 




818.74 


818.74 


Deposit 
Containers 


.61 


1,686.15 


2 / 


-0- 3 / 


1,686.15 



Leaves 325 -0- 25,103.00 25,103.00 

TOTALS 1,151.21 k_l $7,951.60 $61,014.30 $68,965.90 

1__/ The Millbury incineration facility to which Medfield's non- recyclable 
trash is hauled does not accept white metals. 

2_/ Deposit container revenues for 1991 were allocated equally among the 
following accounts: Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day, Grist Mill 
Renovation and Town Common Gazebo. 

3_/ Any incineration and transportation costs saved on deposit containers 
are probably offset by the cost of returning the containers locally. 

4 / This figure represents approximately 18% of Medfield's total waste 

stream, an amount greater than the latest national recycling average (for 
1988) of 13%. 

For 1990, revenues generated by recyclable were as follows: Paper 
($641.06), glass ($2,580.00), white metals ($3,150.00) and deposit containers 
($1,704.40). Paper and glass revenues declined from 1990 to 1991 due to a 
drop in market prices paid to Medfield, not necessarily a drop in tons 
recycled. 



87 



Mandatory Recycling Regulations 

The Recycling Committee believes that mandatory recycling in Medfield 
will further increase the town's cost savings from recycling. At the 1991 
Town Meeting, the Recycling Committee presented proposed regulations mandating 
recycling of newsprint, glass bottles, metal cans and other recyclables. The 
voters approved the regulations, subject to a delay in enforcement until July 
1992. In October 1991, the Recycling Committee submitted a proposed 
enforcement mechanism to the Warrant Committee for inclusion in the Warrant 
for the 1992 Town Meeting. The proposal provides for a fine of $25 per 
mandatory recycling violation, effective July 1, 1992. 

Mi 1 1 is Recycling Consortium 

During 1991, the Recycling Committee was involved with the activities of 
the Mi 1 1 is Recycling Consortium, a group of 20 area towns with the goal of 
combining their recycling power in order to effectively market recyclable 
materials. Recycling Committee members Cynthia Greene, John Moon and Kenneth 
Feeney represented Medfield at Consortium meetings. In mid 1991, the 
Consortium received and reviewed bids for the construction and operation of a 
regional recycling facility capable of serving all Consortium member towns; 
Materials Recovery, Inc., a subsidiary of New England CR Inc., was the 
successful bidder. As of the end of 1991, the Consortium had distributed a 
proposed 20 year contract for review by Medfield and other Consortium members. 
As of this writing, the Board of Selectmen intends to appoint a special 
committee to study the financial implications of signing the Consortium 
contract and sending recyclable to the regional facility versus Medfield 
remaining an independent marketer of its recyclables. 

Public Education Efforts 

The Recycling Committee's public education activities greatly increased 
during 1991. 

1. Medfield Recycling Guide. In September, the Committee published a 
one-page flier entitled "Medfield Recycling Guide," which outlines in detail 
the town's recycling rules. The flier has been distributed at Medfield Day, 
through the public school system and at the Committee's public speaking 
engagements. Copies are still available through the Public Works Department 
and from any Recycling Committee member. 

2. Medfield Day Booth. The Recycling Committee sponsored a booth at 
Medfield Day 1991. The booth featured an educational display illustrating the 
most important DOs and DON'Ts of recycling in Medfield. The Recycling 
Committee raffled several recycling- related items, including a set of storage 
bins for recyclables. Committee members also distributed literature and spoke 
with many Medfield residents, twenty of whom indicated interest in assisting 
the Committee in its work. 

3. Speaking Before Town Organizations. In 1991, the Recycling 
Committee made presentations on recycling issues to the following groups or 
organizations: Medfield Garden Club, Medfield Seniors Club, New 'N Towne Club 
of Medfield, Medfield Lions Club, Wheelock School CSA, Dale Street School CSA, 
High School Boosters, and an 8th grade- level religious education class. 
During the first week of January 1992, the Recycling Committee spoke with the 
Medfield Women's Association and the Hannah Adams Club. Any Medfield group 
wishing to explore local recycling issues may contact the Recycling Committee 
to arrange a speaking date. 



88 



4. Projects in the Planning Stage. The Recycling Committee has also 
begun work on a variety of projects and programs for 1992, including a public 
education program to be carried out by volunteers at the transfer station, a 
panel discussion for the Medfield Employers and Merchants Organization 
(M.E.M.O.) and a spring town cleanup day jointly sponsored with the Park & 
Recreation Commission. The Recycling Committee will also be involved in a 
state-sponsored backyard composting program this spring. 

The Recycling Committee appreciates the community's continuing support of 
its efforts and looks forward to another productive year in 1992. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Cynthia Greene, Co- Chairperson 

John C. Moon, Co-Chairperson 

Kenneth P. Feeney, Town Representative 

Barbara Donnelly 

Cheryl E. Dunlea 

Daniel M. O'Toole 

Erin S. Pastuszenski 

David F. Temple 



TREE AND INSECT PEST CONTROL DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report is for the calendar year ending December 31, 1991. 

The Gypsy Moth population has been increasing in Massachusetts over the 
last three years. Medfield has been identified from aerial surveys, as a 
community, that has been defoliated for two consecutive years. In 1991, 
Medfield had approximately 1,529 acres of defoliation by Gypsy Moth 
Caterpillars. 

Hurricane Bob hit hard taking much of the 1991 tree budget with it. 
Medfield lost about 25 trees along with many broken limbs and much debris. 
Clean up was completed quickly with help from the Highway and Water 
Departments along with the Boston Edison crew. 

Bartlett Tree did line clearing for Boston Edison in Medfield this past 
year. 

Residents are reminded that if they DO NOT wish spraying to be done on 
their property, prior notice must be given no later than March 1 to the Town 
Clerk by registered mail. This notice must be given each year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward M. H ink ley 

TREE WARDEN 

DIRECTOR OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 



89 



TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In July 1991 the School Committee reorganized and elected the following 
officers: William Vellante (Mi 1 1 is) Chairman, Janice Young (Walpole) 
Vice-Chairman, and Dr. D.E. Leco (North Attleboro) Secretary. 

The School Committee conducts its regularly scheduled meetings on the 
first and third Wednesday of each month at 8:00 P.M. in the Committee Meeting 
Room at the school. From the beginning of November until the end of January, 
the Budget Sub-Committee meets on the second and fourth Wednesdays 
specifically for the purpose of budget development. Other subcommittee 
meetings are scheduled as needed. 

GRADUATION 

On June 3, 1991, one hundred fifty-six students were graduated in an 

impressive afternoon ceremony. Chairman Charles Mucciarone delivered the 

Address of welcome to more than one thousand guests. Music was provided by 
the Mi 1 1 is High School band. 

Mary Fleming, Director of Pupil Personnel Services, presented 
scholarships and awards totaling more than $25,000 to deserving senior 
students. Franklin residents who were recipients of awards and scholarships 
were Frank Suchanek, Tiffany Lodico, Dawn Vaughn, Eric Johnson, Audra Alberto, 
Linda Rugoletti. Walpole residents were Alyse McLaughlin, John Daley and Paul 
Cournoyer. North Attleboro residents were Brian Botelho, Jennifer Costa, 
Joshua Collins, Jennifer Martin, Eric Paradis, Neil Boyle, David Gregory, 
Bernadette Mulvaney, and Melanie Soullier. Medway residents were Kurt 
Mistier, Scott Hamel, Shane Stevens, Traci Lee Bennett, Dennis Ceruti, 
Stephanie Coakley, Eric Hoban and Martin Blenkhorn. Gregory Mitchell from 
Medfield, Troy Bickford from Mi 1 1 is and David Pepin and Sean Bray from 
Seekonk. 

PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

In September 1991, Tri -County welcomed approximately 732 students to the 
new school year. Of that number, 10 were Medfield residents. 

The ninth graders embarked on their exploration of eight vocational and 
technical career areas. This program which truly is the best vocational 
evaluation known also requires students to explore areas which are 
nontraditional by gender. It is hoped that more students will select 
nontraditional areas and that any apprehension which may exist for those who 
do will be lessened by this experience. 

Tri -County administered the PSAT's for the College Board. Results of the 
test are used for counseling students regarding postgraduate studies and for 
awarding National Merit Scholarships. Through this program Yeasah Pell of 
Franklin was selected as a National Merit Commended Student. Tri -County 
counselors, parents and students joined other area towns for a Higher 
Education Evening in Walpole with over 200 college Co-op/Vocational counselor 
to work with them on job placement, co-op, and for college counseling. 

The Pupil Personnel Department developed evening programs for 1990-91 
centered around the theme of "Parenting in the 90's". The Guidance department 
established a Peer Helpers program to assist with school adjustment and to 
introduce Vocational Education to junior high students in the community. The 



90 



department continued its programs for parents on Financial Aid, College 

Selection and Special Needs. Tri -County hosted Open Houses for Grade 8 

students and their parents on November 19 and February 13 and continued to 

hold guided tours at the school on Tuesdays for the public. Hundreds of 

parents took the opportunity to tour their vocational technical high school. 

In November 1991, Tri -County sponsored two Career Days for its member 
towns. This year Grade 8 students from the sending towns had the opportunity 
to see and to hear career options centered on eighteen vocational and 
technical areas and to view the vocational technical component of the Franklin 
School System housed at Tri -County. 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

All students at Tri -County follow a core curriculum which requires four 
years of study in each of the major academic disciplines: English, Math, 
Science and Social Studies. Students also are required to successfully 
complete at least two years of physical education, and to take other elective 
programs such as business, word processing, drafting, etc. to insure that 
everyone has a full schedule of classes each year. There are no study periods 
and each student must carry a full schedule. 

Until recently, all academic courses were taught and structured using an 

ability grouped approach. Recently there has been movement towards 

homogeneous grouping of students in some academic courses while maintaining 

ability grouping when curriculum demands such a structure. For instance those 

students who take College Algebra I are clearly top level students. On the 
other hand, students who take the ninth grade science course titled "Health 
Awareness" are heterogeneous ly scheduled. 

Curriculum review and revision continues to be a high priority in all 
academic courses at Tri -County. In response to changes in admissions 
requirements at many engineering colleges we now offer a course titled 
"Introduction to Calculus" as a part of our math offerings. 

During the 1991-92 school year much emphasis will be placed upon the 
further refinement of our "applied" academic curriculum. By ensuring that 
academic concepts are taught through a relevant methodology using examples 
from trade applications as well as actually using a "hands-on" approach when 
possible, we hope to capitalize upon the learning strengths of our students. 
We expect that our program will expand and build upon our existing programs by 
incorporating more academic content in vocational and technical courses; by 
making existing academic courses more vocationally relevant; and by improving 
the alignment of academic and vocational curricula. 

VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS 

Tri -County's vocational programs continue to provide numerous services to 
both individual and community members of the Tri-County School District. 

The Auto Shop is responsible for maintaining, repairing and servicing all 
of our school vehicles. We also provide services and repairs to the people 
who reside in Tri-County's district towns. The Auto Repair program received 
ASE Master Certification from the National Automotive Technicians Education 
Foundation, Inc. (NATEF) in 1990-91. This certification is nationally 
recognized and considered to be the highest achievement known in the 
Automotive Industry. The Master Certification was awarded to the following 
areas of Automotive service: Automatic Transmission and Trans Axle, Brakes, 
Electrical Systems, Engine Performance, Engine Repair, Heating and Air 
Conditioning, Manual Drive Train and Axles and Suspension and Steering. 



91 



Since the addition of Tri -County's new "Down Draft Spray Booth", our 
complete paint jobs have been rated as equal to that of any first class Auto 
Body Repair Shop. Student placement rates remain high in this much needed 
profession. 

The Machine Shop curriculum is designed to meet the needs of industry. 
Industry is seeking students with vertical and horizontal milling machine 
experience. Industry is also desirous of hiring graduate students that have 
experience setting up and operating computer numerical control machines. 
Tri -County graduates have experienced 100% placement over the past several 
years. 

The Metal Fabrication/Industrial Technology program trains our graduates 
in all phases of welding and cutting. Students are able to be tested and 
receive Welding Certification that will help them to gain employment after 
completing school. Industrial Technology students are trained to do 
residential and commercial wiring and perform small engine repair. Industrial 
Technology trains some of our select students to become "Equipment 
Technicians" and to gain employment with Texas Instruments at its highest 
salary level. This successful program that has been in operation for two 
years. 

The Plumbing program continues to provide graduate students with the 

necessary skills and habits to become licensed (state) journeymen. In the 

Plumbing Shop there are simulated house and apartment mock-ups where our 
future plumbers are trained in all aspects of the plumbing trade. 

The simulated shop job activities and the correlated theory program 
within our Electrical program prepare our graduate students for the state 
journeymen examination. 

Both the Carpentry and Masonry shops prepare our student graduates for 
the construction trades. Many of our graduates are employed doing carpentry 
and masonry work in the building industry. Many of our Tri -County Alumni 
operate their own businesses. These two shops recently completed a large 
storage compartment 34' x 24' attached to the plumbing/masonry shops. 

TECHNICAL PROGRAMS 

The Child Care Program continues to attract large numbers of Toddlers and 
Preschool children into their program to service the developmental needs of 
younger members of the Tri-County District. 

Commercial Art has multiple Desktop Publishing computer stations and 
students are learning updated methods of design on state of the art equipment. 
The Page Maker Program is taught to 10, 11 , and 12th grade students. 

Cosmetology provides students with 1000 hours of instruction to prepare 
them for the State License in Hairdressing. Facial and manicuring along with 
hair care continue to make this a popular program for area residents. The 
clinic is open to members of the community during the school year. 

The Culinary Arts Shop has provided Holiday and Ethnic Buffets for area 
residents throughout the year. The Dining Room (Gerry's Place) and Bake Shop 
continue to attract many local patrons. Senior Citizens groups from the 
community visit Tri-County to sample the delicious meals that are prepared by 
the students. Gerry's Place is open to the public for lunch during the school 
year. 



92 



Electronic Technology has added consumer product service to their 
curriculum which will provide additional jobs for students in the Electronic 
field. Many students continue their education at two and four year colleges 
in the area of laser technology and computer programming. 

Graphic Arts has provided their printing service to Town Halls, Police 
and Fire Departments, as well as many nonprofit organizations throughout the 
Tri-County District. 

Marketing/Secretarial Education continues to expand their program by 
offering students instruction in the areas of Legal and Medical Secretarial 
office skills. Along with Retailing and Banking instruction, the students are 
mastering skills in Computerized Accounting, Data Base Management, Word 
Processing and Lotus 1-2-3. Many students receive realistic career training 
in Banking by working at the Dean Cooperative Bank located at Tri-County. The 
Bank is open to the public during the school year for all banking services. 

Medical Career (Nursing Assistant) is a new program in our Technical 
Department. The program is state-certified and provides students with skills 
to work in a variety of medical settings. The course combines both classroom 
instruction and practice in a nursing lab. 

ADULT EDUCATION 

The Evening School program has enrolled approximately 675 students for 
the 1990-91 school year. Nursing Assistant, Advanced Manicuring, Typing, 
Lotus 1-2-3 and Secretarial Skills have been added to the program due to 
increased interest by the residents of the District. The Adult Education 
program of studies will continue to include Carpentry, Cosmetology, Electrical 
Code, Esthetics, HVAC7R, Introduction to CAD, Introduction to Word 
Processing, Machine Shop, Manicuring, Plumbing Code, Welding and Woodworking. 
The Mandatory Code Review course for licensed Electricians will be held on 
selected Saturdays throughout the year. 

ATHLETICS 

Tri-County continued to field ten interscholastic programs as well as 
Fall and Winter Cheerleading. Over one hundred students participated each 
season. All of the teams received either a gold or silver certificate from 
the M.I. A. A. for their academic excellence. 

Patience paid off for Tri-County during the 1990-91 school year. 
Twenty-five students participated in the young Cougar Wrestling team winning 7 
of 11 matches. The Girls' and Boys' Basketball teams showed strong 
improvements with a young team. The Boys' Basketball team made to its first 
ever, state tournament, while the Girls' Basketball team showed signs for next 
season's state tournament. 

The 1990 Fall season saw the school put up their first banner in the gym 
in many years as the Football team was crowned co-champs. The Cross Country 
team had eleven wins with many runners due back next season. The young 
Volleyball and Soccer teams finished with good feelings of years to come. 
Meanwhile the Girls' Cheerleading Squad continued to encourage our teams on. 

The Tri-County Athletic Association continued to recruit new members and 
showed much support to the athletic programs. A newly founded Tri-County Hall 
of Fame Committee was established and looks forward to the induction of its 
first former athletes in 1992. 



93 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Tri -County has an active VICA Chapter (Vocational Industrial Clubs of 
America). In the 1991 National VICA competitions, Tri-County was well 
represented. David Gregory of North Attleboro won a bronze medal and Yeasah 
Pell of Franklin won a merit award (top 10%), Over ninety-nine students 
participated at the local, state and national levels. Plans for this year's 
competition are on- going. 

In the Fall of 1991, Tri-County will be involved in a cultural and 
technical exchange program with Lycee Technique Rene Cassin (Rene Cassin 
Technical School). Tri-County students and staff will host their counterparts 
from France for eight to fifteen days and will journey to France in February 
of 1992 for seven to ten days. 

Potential future exchanges are being explored with a school in Ireland. 

SUMMARY 

As we move into 1992 and continue to provide for the educational needs of 
our students, we wish to thank the District residents for their support and 
cooperation. We intend to maintain in the future the high educational 
standards that have earned Tri-County that support in the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Vellante, Chairman 
Werner Ki ess ling, Medfield 



94 



WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

At the April 1990 Town Meeting, the Town voted Articles 35 and 36 
authorizing the establishment of an Enterprise Fund system for the Water and 
Sewer Departments respectively. In order to properly establish this system it 
was considered necessary to set up a separate accounting system that would 
allow depreciation accounting and allocation of certain shared costs to the 
departments. A separate computer system was installed in order to facilitate 
this move. Associated with that acquisition was the capability of separately 
handling the billing process, which for a long time has required manual record 
keeping. We are now in the process of converting to computerized records so 
that the cumbersome index card system can be eliminated. 

Associated with this change in operations was the requirement that 
departments "stand on their own" financially. Water and sewer revenues were 
increased in April 1991 in anticipation of going into fiscal 1992 with the 
proper level of rates in place so that the department could indeed "stand on 
its own" financially. As an aid to cash flow, a system of quarterly billing 
was instituted at that time. Results of the first six months of operations of 
fiscal 1992 are now being assembled, and it appears that we are pretty much on 
target with our present levels of revenue. 

Our Water Department continues to operate with marginal supply 
capability. It was necessary in July to ask our users to use water sparingly 
via a voluntary water ban that was put into effect for approximately five 
weeks. We have moved forward (albeit slowly) with the program for activation 
of our Well #6 located on State Hospital property, operated under the 
jurisdiction of Department of Environmental Management, Division of Forests & 
Parks. Late in August a meeting was held to establish the ground rules as to 
who to contact and what jurisdictions would be involved in the land use and/or 
transfer transactions that should take place. We have also received 
authorization from Department of Environmental Protection for the withdrawal 
of up to 1.58 million gallons per day at this location. It is anticipated 
that we will be going ahead with construction of the necessary connecting 
pipeline and wellhead system in approximately 12 to 24 months, barring 
unforeseen difficulties that might crop up. 

Construction of the Project 6 Harding Street Interceptor System was 
completed during the year, and substantial completion of Project 7, Pine 
Needle Park Street Sewer System occurred during the year, thus completing the 
last major sewer project that had been designed under the original design 
funding process. There are several small unfinished projects that have been 
designed, but none are of the magnitude of Project 7. We have received a 
preliminary report from our engineers, Weston & Sampson, as to the potential 
locations and volumes involved in our Infiltration/Inflow (I/I) elimination 
program. We have authorized them to proceed with a request to the State for 
grant approval for continued more specific I/I work. We expect to move 
forward with this work in the spring of 1992. 

There continues to be activity with developers, especially in the 
northeast quadrant of the Town. While some have experienced financial 
difficulties and delays have occurred as a result, these activities are 
continuing to add to our system load, especially water, since it virtually 
covers The Town, whereas the sewer system does not. 



95 



We must note the resignation of Geoffrey Sauter from the Board. In his 
place we welcome Mr. John McKeever, appointed in January, 1991, whose area of 
expertise is accounting, a much needed resource at this particular point in 
time. 

Finally, on behalf of the Board, I would like to express our thanks for 
your continued cooperation, and to the employees of the department for their 
continued effort to provide water and sewer services. We wish also to thank 
the various other departments and agencies of the Town for their continued 
cooperation and assistance. Please remember also that our water sources are 
finite, requiring your continued attention to the most efficient and 
conservative usage of water. Thank you so much for your continued loyal 
support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Leland D. Beverage, Chairman 
Peyton C. March 
John McKeever 



96 



MEDFIELD YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The first meeting of the Youth Advisory Commission was held November 6, 
1991. All meetings are on the first Wednesday of the month. The Commission 
meets in the Selectmen's office at the Town House. 

The Commission consists of eight adults and forty-seven students. 



ADULTS : Mary V. Gil I is 

Wm "Jack" Heller 
Gay W. D'Amaro 
Robert G. Hudson 
Thomas P. McNiff 
Elizabeth Newton 
Regina O'Connor 
Harold F. Pritoni 



Jr. 



Youth Advisor 

Youth Advisor 

School Committee 

Police Department 

Police Department 

Youth Outreach 

St. Edwards Youth Ministry 

Board of Selectmen 



GRADE 9 STUDENTS: Matthew Anderton, Allison Bruns f Lauren Flannery, 
Allison Foley, John Fratolillo, Jr. Michael Hajjar f Brian 
Henry, Jennifer Logsdon, Jodi Marino, Brian Maser, Erin Medina, 
Jaclyn O'Leary, Juan Santos, Anna-Man" Spognardi, David Taylor 
and Brett Thomson. 



GRADE 10 STUDENTS: 



DavidCahill, Paul Galante III, Lisa Halliday, 
Melissa Kelcourse, Sara Mastronardi, Marc Mercadante, Marc 
Mercadante, Eric Palson, Daniel Rosen and Nicholas Scobbo III. 



GRADE 11 STUDENTS: Courtney Cannon, Peter Cornwell, Jr., Jon Fletcher, 
Adam Gottlieb, Alisa Kendrick, Alexis Kosc, Garrett Larkin, 
Kenneth Martin, Catherine Moroney, Christine Nolan, Mary 
Kathleen Sullivan, Gregory Tomson and Heather Wood. 

GRADE 12 STUDENTS: Nicole Bois, Robert Counihan, Jr., Audrey Duncan, 
Peter Gambardella, David Ha j jar, David Logsdon, Jennifer 
Mercadante, Glen Panciocco and Tracey Anne Powers. 



At the 
follows: 



closing of the first meeting the election of officers was as 



David Ha j jar 
Paul Galante III 
David Logsdon 
Audrey Duncan 
Jennifer Mercadante 



Chairperson 
Vice Chairperson 
Vice Chairperson 
Secretary 
Assistant Secretary 



At the first meeting the Youth Advisory Commission voted unanimously 
sponsor the Medfield Youth Bowling Association in Name only. 



to 



97 



GOALS; 1. Toy Drive for the children of the Franciscan Children's 
Hospi tal in Brighton. 

2. Volunteer work at the Medvale Nursing Home and the 
Veteran's Hospital in West Roxbury. 

3. Social and Charity Events. 

4. Fund Raisers. 

5. Community projects. 

6. Working with under classmates. 

7. Researching a drop- in-center plus several other ideas. 

This past Christmas "1991" the Youth Advisory Commission students had a 
very successful toy drive. All toys were delivered to the Franciscan 
Children's Hospital in Brighton, MA in time to put a lot of smiles on a group 
of needy children. The students that delivered the toys were greeted with a 
warm reception. 1992 looks promising for our Youth Advisory Commission. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary V. Gil I is 
Wm "Jack" Heller 

ADVISORS - YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Veterans' services is a service to help veterans with information on 
pensions, benefits when needed, hospitalization, social security, education 
and burial allowances. 

Benefits include fuel, clothing, food, housing and medical expenses for 
eligible veterans and their families. The Commonwealth then reimburses the 
town seventy- five percent of the benefits. 

I wish to thank the town officials for their assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul F. Curran 
VETERANS' AGENT 



98 



PUBLIC SCHOOL REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1991 



99 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



The year 1991 was one of the most difficult faced by the Medfield 
School System in many years. Due in large part to the economic recession 
which has affected the region for the last few years and the sharp decrease 
in local aid from the state, Medfield and many other municipalities have 
experienced severe budget shortfalls and have been forced to reduce the 
quality and quantity of services offered. 

Local aid from the state to Medfield has in fact decreased since fiscal 
year 1989 by over one million dollars, including a decrease from fiscal year 
1991 to 1992 of $458,000. With such significant revenue losses, the schools 
have had to make many adjustments in operations, curriculum and staffing in 
order to live within available funds. 

The School Committee began the school year in September 1990, with a 
budget which barely met the educational needs of the town. As the year pro- 
gressed, however, the news from the State House was that the expected level 
of local aid would not be forthcoming, thus forcing the Committee to make 
reductions at mid-year. In order to live within the newly reduced budget, 
the Committee approved recommendations from the Superintendent which cut 
three librarians in February. It was very distressing to the Committee to 
have to take such actions, but it was felt that this was preferable to 
affecting classroom teachers. 

For the first time in memory, the school budget for the 1991-92 school 
year actually decreased. As noted above, local aid to Medfield decreased by 
$485,000 which required all town departments including the schools to reduce 
spending. Savings were realized by not hiring needed personnel, but at the 
expense of significant increases in class size in grades kindergarten 
through eight. Savings were also realized by curtailing the computer 
education program at the elementary level and through salary savings on 
senior staff who were on leave for the year. Volunteer school support 
groups were extremely helpful by agreeing to fund certain programs which 
otherwise would have been eliminated. 

It is questionable how long the Medfield Schools can continue to 
provide a quality education without adequate funding. Our school population 
is increasing which presents the need for more teaching staff and our 
physical assets must continue to be maintained. The funding shortfall is 
largely attributable to state reductions and unless this situation is 
reversed, the people of Medfield will have to decide to what extent they are 
willing to support education. There is some hope on the horizon in the 
form of initiatives at the state level to reform school operations and to 
increase state spending on education. These efforts will be closely watched 
by the Committee. 

Negotiations began with the Medfield Teachers Union in January of 1991, 
on a contract to succeed the one ending in June. Little progress has been 
made, and the two sides are still meeting one year later under the guidance 
of a state appointed mediator. Because of a lack of funds and the economic 
uncertainties ahead, the Committee does not feel it can offer a salary 
increase in the first year of a new contract. Meetings will continue and 
the hope is that an agreement can be reached without disruption to the 
education of our students. 



100 



In response to recommendations made by the New England Association of 
Schools and Colleges (NEASC), and to provide for future expected growth at 
the high school, a School Planning and Building Committee was appointed by 
the Town Moderator. The Committee is to make recommendations on resolving 
space problems at the high school and on improvements to the building which 
is widely agreed to be a substandard facility. The Building Committee has 
toured the building, met with staff and administrators and determined the 
needs at the high school. At the April Town Meeting, a sum of $25,000 was 
approved to hire an architect to draw up preliminary plans for the building 
and an agreement has been entered into for that purpose. This is a project 
that will require a commitment from the town to provide for the future of 
our young people and it is hoped that the needed support will be 
forthcoming. 

Also at the April Town Meeting it was voted to appoint a 
Regional izat ion Study Committee to investigate the feasibility of Medfield 
merging with another town to form a regional school district. The committee 
had discussions with representatives from Westwood, Dover and Mi 1 1 is and 
after considering the issue recommended to a joint meeting of the Selectmen 
and School Committee that regional izat ion was not a viable option. The 
committee cited as some of the reasons for its recommendations that Medfield 
would lose control over the operation of its schools, that Medfield's 
emphasis on quality education might be compromised by joining with a town 
that might not share the same values, that Medfield's school population is 
increasing and that regional izat ion would not offer the dollar savings that 
some proponents believe. 

As 1991 closes, the Committee is working to develop the budget for the 
1992-93 school year. Once again this poses a tremendous challenge because 
of the fiscal uncertainties that lie ahead. Our school population continues 
to grow as next year's kindergarten class will be at least equal to this 
year's class of approximately 190. Meanwhile the senior class graduating in 
June 1992 numbers only 105 and the junior class only 103. The schools are 
faced with significantly increasing demands but with declining resources to 
fund them. 

Lest this report paint too bleak a picture of the Medfield Schools, 
there is also much good to report. Our high school graduates continue to be 
accepted at some of the nation's finest universities and colleges. Our 
teaching staff continues to challenge and motivate students despite less 
than adequate facilities and financial support, and testing scores continue 
to be high. 

Our school support groups have been outstanding. The Community School 
Associations at the various buildings are supportive not only financially 
but with willing volunteers to help where needed. The Medfield Coalition 
for Public Education has been very successful in its Mini -Grant Program for 
teachers and in many other areas of school support. The Medfield Boosters 
had a successful fund-raising year partly due to an increased concession 
stand business from night athletic games and has been very generous in its 
support of programs and scholarships. The Medfield Performing Arts Council 
and the Medfield School Music Boosters have been diligently supporting 
programs despite decreased budget support. Special thanks must go to the 
Medfield Lions Club which has been generous in supporting school programs 
whenever called upon, and to the League of Women Voters for their 
support of education. Recognition must also be given to a group of 
dedicated individuals who organized as the Med-Field Lights Committee and 
raised nearly $40,000 to install lighting at the high school football field. 



101 



This has allowed night games in 
increased attendance and revenues. 



football, soccer and field hockey with 



Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Hajjar, Chairman 
Teresa Fannin, Vice Chairman 
Gay D'Amaro, Secretary 
Robert Kinsman, Treasurer 
F. Paul Quatromoni 




The Middle School was dedicated this year in honor of past 
Superintendent Thomas A. Blake. 



102 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF 
SCHOOLS 

To the Citizens of Medfield: 

As we review the past year, we note the following: 

ENROLLMENT: 

The year 1991 showed an increase in our population of seventy-four (74) 
students. Our overall enrollment currently stands at one thousand eight 
hundred and eighty-four (1,884) students. The four year projection is for 
an overall increase of 17.9% (+339 students) in the K-12 enrollment. This 
coincides with both state and national trends. In 1995 our projected 
enrollment K-12 will be 2,223 students. Distribution of this projected 
enrollment is as follows: 

High School - 556 

Middle School - 505 

Dale Street School - 357 

Memorial School - 185 

Wheelock School - 573 

Special Education - 47 

POPULATION PROJECTIONS VS. INDIVIDUAL SCHOOL CAPACITY: 

If the population projections as presented above hold true, there will 
be a need to review our existing facilities relative to individual building 
capacities vs. projected student population. It appears as of this writing, 
that only the Memorial and the Middle Schools will adequately house the an- 
ticipated enrollments. The Ralph Wheelock will be 43 over capacity, the 
Dale Street School will be 17 over capacity and the High School will be 61 
over capacity. During the next few years we will be reviewing all options 
available so as to minimize the impact of enrollment on both facilities and 
programs. 

BUDGET: 

In FY91 the school budget was $8,253,000. This represented an increase 
of +2.6% over FY90. Due to unanticipated expenses we were forced to make a 
mid-year reorganization which resulted in the dismissal of three librarians. 
The deficit accounts that forced the reorganization included the substitute 
teacher account, utilities, sick leave buy back, food services and a 
chairlift account. As a result of the mid-year (February) reorganization, 
the money saved on librarian salaries was used to offset the above listed 
deficit accounts. 

Also impacted by the difficult economic times has been the progress of 
teacher negotiations. Teachers have been working without a contract since 
September. Contract negotiations with teachers are now under the control of 
a state appointed mediator. 
CURRICULUM: 

Again this year our systemwide emphasis has been in the areas of 
reading and writing. A reading committee has been formed to study the 
reading program in grades K through 12. It is our hope that this committee 
and the articulation that occurs will be of benefit to the total reading 
program in our schools. Also, it is hoped that this committee will come up 
with strategies that will help reduce the number of students who are 
currently reading below grade level. 



103 



Our emphasis in writing is to continue our goal of last year which was 
to place emphasis on writing skills in all grades and subject areas. Also, 
it is our intent again this year to have a systemwide "Celebrating Writing 
Program." 

Our results in state testing continue to be exemplary. Those few stu- 
dents who need follow-up work as evidenced by test scores will be handled on 
an individual basis. 

STRATEGIC PLAN: 

One of our goals this year was to explore the possibilities of a long 
range strategic plan for the Medfield Public Schools. This was a concept 
which I felt would permit us to anticipate and manage change rather than 
waiting for events to occur and then react and make decisions. I envisioned 
this plan to move us educationally into the 21st century. In September I 
presented my concept to the School Committee. Since then the strategic plan 
has become much larger in scope than my initial design. Originally I had 
envisioned a strategic plan which would gain community support for quality 
education. My vision has now been expanded to a townwide strategic plan. 
To this end we are currently forming an appropriate committee. Should the 
townwide initiative fail we will revert back and proceed with our original 
plan. 

Our discussions thus far have been most interesting. It is my hope 
that the resulting document will serve us well as we contemplate the vision 
that will guide the education of our children for years to come. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas M. Re is 
Superintendent of Schools 



104 



REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with great pleasure that I submit to the citizens of Medfield an 
Annual Town Report. As the Assistant Superintendent of Schools, the period 
between January 1, 1991 and December 31, 1991 proved to be most challenging as 
we continued to provide the same quality of services to the children of 
Medfield under difficult budget restrictions. 

Budget 

In November of 1990, a projected deficit of $184,000 was identified in 
the ,, FY91" budget. Factors contributing to this deficit were higher energy 
costs, collective bargaining considerations, long-term teacher illnesses and 
unexpected construction costs. In an effort to ensure the fiscal credibility 
of the school system, recommendations were made to the School Committee to 
balance the budget. The most controversial of these proposals was the dis- 
missal of three school librarians from February 1991 to June 1991. I am 
pleased to announce that the actions of the School Committee resulted in a 
balanced budget for "FY91." As difficult as this situation would be under 
normal circumstances, it was complicated by the need to prepare and present 
the "FY92" budget request. 

With guidelines provided by the Warrant Committee, the school system at- 
tempted to prepare a "FY92" budget reflecting a - 2.2% decrease over "FY91." 
Through the extraordinary efforts of the systemwide Curriculum Council and the 
Administrative Management Team, the School Committee presented a "FY92" budget 
proposal of $8,151,855 or -1.2% in comparison to "FY91" to Town Meeting in 
April of 1991. 

In preparing this summary I am pleased to report to the citizens of 
Medfield that we are not anticipating a deficit in the "FY92" budget. 

Transportation 

In an effort to reduce the "FY92" budget, a revision to the transporta- 
tion policy was necessary. The School Committee implemented the following 
policy: 

Children in Grades 7-12 who live two miles or more from their respective 
schools were eligible to ride the school bus at no cost. Children in Grades 
1-5 who live one mile or more from their respective schools were eligible to 
ride the school bus at no cost; and all kindergarten children were transported 
at no cost to their parents. 

The above mentioned revisions resulted in the reduction of three buses 
from the transportation fleet at a cost savings of $93,000. 

As we forecast for next year's budget, the school system may be required 
to further revise the present policy to reflect the state mandate which would 
significantly reduce the present transportation appropriation. 

Food Service 

The Food Service Department, under the able leadership of Mrs. Sharon 
Martin, underwent a significant restructuring during 1991. Attempts to make 
the Food Service Department a self-sufficient entity required the dismissal of 
two full time equivalent employees and the increasing of school lunch prices 
for children. 



05 



The reforms implemented by Mrs. Martin with the approval of the School 
Committee have resulted in a positive mid-year audit. Much credit for this 
success must go to the cafeteria employees who have demonstrated tremendous 
dedication and perseverance under extremely difficult circumstances. 

Plant Management 

The single largest investment to the citizens of Medfield can be found in 
the five school facilities which constitute the school system. The mainte- 
nance of these facilities and surrounding grounds is a task of monumental im- 
portance addressed by a dedicated and diligent custodial and maintenance staff 
under the able leadership of Mr. Austin Buchanan. 

In Mr. Buchanan's first year of operation several significant changes 
have been implemented which have had a positive impact on the effectiveness 
and efficiency in which custodial services are performed. 

The need to reduce the school budget resulted in the termination of a 
service contract for the heating and ventilation of the school system. The 
termination of this contract resulted in a savings of over $85,000 during this 
fiscal budget cycle. In its place, we are employing a heating specialist who 
is making many positive contributions to our school system. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

As the Chairman of the systemwide Curriculum Council, I am pleased with 
the accomplishment of our Curriculum Council and the direction in which we are 
heading. During 1991 and despite the siege mentality that has a tendency to 
exist when budgets are cut, I was pleased that the Curriculum Council avoided 
a status quo mindset and proceeded on projects which will have a positive im- 
pact on our children and their education in the future. 

On a systemwide basis a curriculum video library was established through 
the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Research and De- 
velopment projects in computers, student scheduling and grading, special 
education, science, language arts, social studies and writing were success- 
fully completed during the school vacation period. The first Celebrating 
Writing Competition was conducted to rave reviews last May. 

During the past year, a significant number of teachers and administrators 
participated in workshops sponsored through The Education Cooperative on 
mixed-ability grouping, cooperative education, whole language, writing across 
the curriculum, critical thinking skills and program assessment. At the High 
School, the Science Department will introduce a new Grade Nine Program in En- 
vironment Sciences to begin next September. The Middle School is presently 
involved in staff training in the area of mixed-ability grouping and student 
communication skills development. At the elementary level, a committee to 
study the present reading program has been initiated. 

Superintendent Reis initiated the concept of developing a long-range 
Strategic Plan for the school system which has since been adopted by the Se- 
lectmen to include all townwide agencies. 

I submit that we must be committed to maintaining the present 
self -evaluation process to ensure that our curriculum and programs continue to 
evolve as current trends in education dictate. 






106 



Summary 

I thank the Medfield School Committee and the Superintendent of Schools 
for providing me the opportunity to serve the children of Medfield. Despite 
budget restrictions I see a school system that possesses vision, focus and 
leadership. A vibrancy exists that will continue to ensure the 
quality of education that will provide them with the necessary tools to 
pete in a competitive society. 



children i 
corn- 



Respectfully, 

John A. Moretti 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools 





^ ;s t?M^t 




Dale Street School Fourth Grade Luau. 



107 



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114 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 
NEW PERSONNEL AND EFFECTIVE DATE 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Maguire, Robert 

MIDDLE SCHOOL 

McCarthy, Elaine 
Walunas, Kathryn 

RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

Christie, Carolyn 

MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

*Green, Susan 

KINDERGARTEN AIDE 

*0'Donnell, Ruth 



July 



September 
September 



September 



September 



September 



HIGH SCHOOL LIBRRARY AIDE 



Gorham, Sandra 
MUSIC 

*Jovin, Dale 
CUSTODIANS 
Kelly, Cathy 



Apr i I 



PUPIL SERVICES 

Coffey, Ann September 

*Melvin, Elizabeth October 

Twombley, Juliana September 

SECRETARIAL 

Driscoll, Ma re i a August 

Hicks, Donna August 

Hirtle, Patricia January 



FOOD SERVICE 

LaPlante, Laurie September 
*Konevich, Stephanie September 

MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST 

Spillane, Bernard July 

WEEK-END WATCH PERSON 
*Sessa, Robert December 



February 

January 

*Part-time Employee 
TERMINATIONS 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Filledes, Tassos (Retired) June 

*Gorham, Sandra June 

*Rainville, Honora June 

MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Barry, Constance (Retired) June 

Farnham, Frank (Retired) June 

Garfield, Suzanne (Resigned) August 

DALE STREET SCHOOL 

*Murphy, Dorothy June 



115 



RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

Argir, James (Resigned) August 

Bertram, Barbara June 

Fitzpatrick, Richard (Resigned) June 

Landfield, Nancy (Resigned) June 

MEMORIAL SCHOOL 



♦Graham, Karen 
PUPIL SERVICES 



June 



Burke, Erin (Resigned) June 

Foster, Susan (Resigned) April 

Gil I is, Mary June 

Herren, Johanna June 

Mulcahy, Darlene (Resigned) April 

Man" am", Dianne (Resigned) December 

Pal I is, Sylvia (Resigned) August 

Rosenfeld, Rene (Resigned) April 



TERMINATIONS (Continued) 



SECRETARIAL 



Iafolla, Joy (Retired) June 

Laquidara, Mary (Retired) January 

FOOD SERVICE 



LaPlante, Laurie 
Ronca, Lori 



June 
June 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE 

*Arnold, Ellen April 

Barnes, Diane June 

Michaels-Brodsky, Claudia June 

Lawless-Croak, Anne June 

Palazzolo, Jane June 

Snyder, Pamela June 



*Part-time Employee 



116 



REPORT OF THE AMOS CLARK 
KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of Medfield High School, I respectfully submit our Annual 
Report for the school year ending December 31 , 1991. 

This was a year of transition at Medfield High School with the 
retirement of Principal Tassos P. Filledes. Tass provided 21 years of 
service to the youth of Medfield, serving for 17 years as the high school 
pr i nc i pa I . 

The official enrollment of the high school for the 1991-92 school year 
is 424. There were 106 students who graduated in the class of 1991. Of 
those, 93% have gone on to post secondary education. 

This year was marked by outstanding achievement on the part of many 
students. Among its graduates, 21% were members of the National Honor 
Society. Christina Karnakis and Catherine Gray were Valedictorian and 
Salutatorian, respectively. A number of students were honored for academic 
excellence by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, including Adam 
Fontecchio who was named a Semi -Finalist and will compete in 1992 for one of 
6,000 National Merit Scholarships. The eleven Commended Students are Mark 
Andrews, Jodi Daugherty, F. Aaron D'Orlando, Sean Garrity, Karen Guilmette, 
Andrew Harris, Kristin Heavey, Christopher Naughton, Mark Olinger, Nicole 
Ricard and Theodore Temple. Mark Olinger was also recognized by the 
University of Massachusetts, being awarded the Chancellor's Award for 
Academic Excellence. Onyi Utaegbulam was Commended by the National Program 
for Outstanding Negro Students. 

Over 98% of our graduating seniors took the College Board Examinations. 
Our SAT and Achievement scores were well above the state and local averages. 
We are pleased to announce that our verbal mean score was 475 and our math 
mean score was 522. 

Medfield High School students not only excelled in the classroom but 
also in the areas of extracurricular activities. Seventy- three per cent of 
the student body participated in our interscholastic athletic program. A 
major addition to our athletic program was the erection of lights on the 
high school athletic facility. The excitement generated by this important 
addition created a great deal of enthusiasm and increased school spirit of 
both students and parents. In addition, the increased revenues from gate 
receipts are used to assist in defraying the cost of our athletic programs. 

This year the high school has made strides toward improving the use of 
technology. The high school computer lab was enlarged by the removal of a 
temporary partition wall. This allowed all departments to access and inte- 
grate computers into their curriculum. Five Apple Mackintosh LC computers 
were added to the computer room through donations from Roche Brothers Super- 
market. The high school library was connected to the satellite receiver lo- 
cated at the middle school complex and several classes participated in 
interactive satellite course work. 

In May the high school was placed on warning by the New England Asso- 
ciation of Schools and Colleges for failure to adhere to the Commission's 
standard on high school libraries. The high school administration filed the 
Two- Year Progress Report required by the NEASC in November. 



117 



The high school administration also worked closely with the School 
Planning and Building Committee which was conducting a study of the high 
school facility needs and space requirements. 

The high school staff was involved in a series of workshops entitled 
Writing Across the Curriculum. During the fall the Academic Standards 
Committee agreed that the teaching of writing should be emphasized in all 
learning areas. 

Students and staff continued to be involved with our Reading for 
Pleasure Program. Two days each week for 30 minutes time is set aside to 
promote enjoyment reading for all individuals in the school. 

This past spring marked the introduction of the Celebrating Writing 
Program. Students submitted original writing projects to a district-wide 
committee. Winners received recognition at an awards night. 

The Physical Education Department expanded the Fundamentals of Fitness 
Program to include an aerobics program. Students completed individual 
fitness assessments and developed programs for their health. 

The Social Studies Department continued their involvement in the Clark 
University Model United Nations Program. Twenty-five students participated 
in this three-day event. 

The English Department continues to publish the Literary Magazine which 
includes original writing by the students as well as students' art work. 
The school newspaper was produced regularly by journalism students. 

The Health Department, in conjunction with the Athletic Department, 
hosted the fifth annual Call to Excellence Program. Approximately 400 
parents and their children were involved in workshops centered on sound 
decision- making skills. Thirty high school volunteer peer counselors 
continued to work with students in grade 6 to encourage youngsters to avoid 
substance abuse. 

The year 1991 marked a time of very active involvement by students in 
the Theatre Society. The spring musical was "Anything Goes." Three 
performances were held which were very well attended. Sixty-three pupils, 
including actors, stagehands and musicians, made this a very exciting 
performance. The fall performance was "Flowers for Algernon." Two 
performances were entertained by twenty-eight pupils who served as actors 
and stagehands. In the spring, Susan Ciatto represented Medfield High 
School in the Massachusetts Shakespeare Competition. This year also marked 
a new activity for the Theatre Society as they were involved in a two-act 
show entitled "Lovers." This workshop activity, in conjunction with the 
Medfield Arts Council, allowed students to perform with members of the 
community in a collaborative effort. In addition to a very active schedule 
of performances the Theatre Society's focus was to improve the lighting in 
the high school auditorium. A new lighting bar was purchased through club 
fund-raising efforts. Individual light fixtures were purchased through 
donations by the Music Boosters, the Medfield High School Boosters and the 
Medfield Coalition for Public Education as well as private donations. 

As Principal of Medfield High School I am more than satisfied with the 
many positive happenings that have taken place in our school community. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Medfield School Com- 
mittee, the Superintendent of Schools, the Assistant Superintendent and the 



118 






many parents and community groups for their continued support, 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert C. Maguire 
Principal 




Senior Class Picnic 




Freshman Pep Rally 



119 



GRADUATION EXERCISES 



OF 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 




CLASS OF 1991 



Sunday, June 2, 1991 — 2:00 P.M 



120 



PROGRAM 

PROCESSIONAL Class of 1991 

"Pomp and Circumstance" — Elgar 

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM Angclique Talbot 

Class of 1991 

WELCOME Meaghan McNultv 

President, Class of 1991 

MESSAGE TO GRADUATING CLASS Thomas Reis 

Superintendent of Schools 

HONOR ESSAYS Christina Karnakis, Valedictorian 

Catherine Gray, Salulatorian 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT Drew D'Amaro 

Vice President, Class of 1991 

MESSAGE TO THE CLASS OF 1991 William Najjar 

Chairman, Medfield School Committee 

REFLECTIONS Tassos P. Filledes 

Principal 

PRESENTATION OF AWARDS 

Honor Awards Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 

Friends of Medfield Library Amy Fiske Memorial Award Ann Russo 

Medfield School Boosters School Spirit Awards Linda Danielson 

Medfield Teachers Association Book Awards Richard Shapiro 

American Legion Medals Robert Farrell 

Bob Porack Memorial Awards Ralph Dunlea 

Medfield High School Drama Club Awards Regina O'Connor 

Robert Belmont Track and Held Team Spirit Award Jacqueline Davis 

Student Council Awards Ellen Dugan 

Medfield Music Boosters Award Bob Hersee 

121 



PRI SI NIATION OF SCHOLARSHIPS 

National Merit Scholarship - Litton Industries Robert Kinsman 

Dep a rtment of the Army Scholarship Medfleld School Committee 

Roche Brothers Supermarkets - Citizens Scholarship Foundation 

Massachusetts AFL-CIO Local 1044 Teresa Fannin 

Emory University Music Scholarship Medfleld School Committee 

Brandefe University Sachar Award 

Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Gay D'Amaro 

Shaw's Supermarket Scholarship Medfleld School Committee 

Rochester Institute of Technology Scholarship 

GTE Scholarship F. Paul Quatromonl 

Harvard Radcliffe National Scholarship Medjleld School Committee 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Significant Achievement Award 

Peter Panciocco Memorial Scholarship William Tosches 

Proud to be Substance Free Scholarship Allison Foley 

Jaclyn O'Leary 

Pnidential Page Realty Scholarship Al Rao 

In memory of Angelo Contieri 

Amy Fiske American Flekl Service Scholarship Moira McCabe 

Madclyn L. Grant Scholarships William F. Nourse 

National Honor Society Scholarships/ A wards Richard Shapiro 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club Scholarships Elaine Hegedus 

Cecile Levesque Memorial Scholarship 

Medfield Lions Club Scholarships Robert Dennehy 

Ciba Corning Diagnostics Scholarships William Goodall 

Medfield Police Association Scholarship Robert Naughton 

Medfield Women's Association Scholarship Lorl Cerel 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarships William Drengberg 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarship Dave Nowers 

In memory of Ed Duhamel 

American Legion Women's Auxiliary Susan Carney 

Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarship Assistant Principal 

Medfield Employers & Merchants Organization Scholarship Pat Scarsciottl 

Dental Health Services Scholarship Dr. Brian Thomas 

Roberts Mitchell Funeral Service Scholarship Tracy Mitchell 

•PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 

William Haj)ar, Chairman, Medfleld School Committee 
Thomas Reis, Superintendent of Schools 
Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 

RECESSIONAL Class of 1991 

"Consecration of the House" — Beethoven 

'Please refrain from applause until all graduates have received their diplomas. 

122 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES — CLASS OF 1991 



Krlsten Elaine Alello 
Scott Christopher Alberta 
Mathlas Andersson 
Klmberly Taylor Arnold 
Klmberiy Joyce Baker 

* Michelle Anne Baker 
t* Susan Lynn BartJett 

Susan Carol Baughman 
Kristofor Rodd Behn 
Daniel Beretsky 
Donald Wlngate BlaJr, Jr. 
Val Boston, IV 
Andrea Jean Bouvier 
Chad Thomas Boylan 
Johanna Elizabeth Brown 
Christopher Michael Burden 
t* Klrsten Buttler 

* Sarah Lynn Cain 
Sandra Ann Carrlgan 
Melissa Ann Carroll 
Jennifer Lee Catalano 
John Scott Chambers 
Katherine Jane Christy 
Elizabeth A. Clarke 
Jeffrey William Clifford 
Stacey Renee Collins 
Edward Joseph Cosgrove 
Karen Jean Counlhan 
Heather Marie Craig 
Kelly Patricia Croke 

t* Andrew Uoyd D'Amaro 
Nicolas David Davies 
Anthony Gllmore DePalma 
Jeffrey Jerome DiGlovannl 
Donald William Duffy 
Allison Leigh Dunn 
Cheryl Lynn Evans 
'Allison Jayne Ewing 
'Colleen Marie Rtzpatrick 



David Andrew Foley 
Lynette Marie Foley 

* James Joseph Folino 
t* Stacy Eugenie Foran 

James Earle Foscaldo 
Andrla Ellssa Gelerman 
Brian Charles Glangregorio 
Scott Eric Glessler 
Lisa Rose Glrolamo 

* Patricia Marie Good 
Darrin Michael GoodaJl 

t* Catherine Anne Gray 

Douglas James Main 

Tidal Boyce Henry, III 
t* Kathryn Anne Hlrtle 

Christopher John I lolden 

Suzanne Alicia Horton 

James lmbert, Jr. 

Rebecca Susan Interrante 
t* Daria Grace Jacobs 
t* Christina Victoria Karnakis 

Joshua Lawrence Kell 

Amy Kate Klempa 
t* Susan Thomas Kozel 

Nicole Lynn Kunzig 
t* Stacey Nicole Lengyel 

Sarah Ann Lomax 

George Gean Lorantos, Jr. 

Anne Luciano 

David Lee Mackintosh 

Teri Allison Madsen 

* Michael Joseph Marcel 
John Francis Marino 
Meredith Masi 

* Michelle Louise Mattabonl 
Brian Timothy McAvoy 

f# Meaghan Ann McNulty 
Amy Lynn Meeker 
Elizabeth Anne Moore 



'Alicia Forbes Moss 

Jason Eric Nash 

Meghan Allison O'Brien 

Peter Simon O'Donovan 

Kevin Joseph O'Leary 

Krlsten Ann Palson 

Brian Christopher Picardi 

Karen Lynn Pierce 

Christina Marie Pittore 

Danielle Christina Rank 

Douglas Edward Pollard 

Joseph William Qulntlna, Jr. 

Satesh Kumar Raju 

Sean Michael Reardon 

David Wayne Ross 

Kenneth Thomas Ryan 

Almee Dianne Sabourin 

Gina Marie Savastano 

Thomas M. Scecina 

Amanda Elizabeth Shaw 

Alysa Norma Snlpas 

Daniel J. Spaeth 

Alexander Dulaney Stephenson 

Brendan Browe Sullivan 
* Emily Reed Sullivan 

Daniel Patrick Sweeney 
'Angellque Suzelte Talbot 

Matthew James Therlault 

Judith Lynn Thomson 

Simon R. E. Towers 

Christopher Matthew Tunney 

Richard Egwuenu 

Chldiegwu Utaegbulam 

Diane Marie Vozzella 

Gerald John Vozzella 

Brian Tate Welnert 

Susan Marie Whelan 
t'AllsonLeeSlmWoo 



MARSHALLS 
Mark Andrews Andrew Harris 



tUpper 10% of th« graduating class academically 
'National Honor Society 



123 



REPORT OF THE THOMAS A. BLAKE 
MIDDLE SCHOOL 



To the Super intendent of Schools: 

It is my pleasure to submit the Thomas A. Blake Middle School's Annual 
Report for the year ending December 31, 1991. The Middle School was renamed 
the Thomas A. Blake Middle School on September 22 at a dedication ceremony 
honoring the former Superintendent of Schools who served this community from 
1956 to 1971. Over 200 community members, faculty, family and friends at- 
tended the dedication exercises as the new sign bearing Blake's name was un- 
veiled on the east wing of the building. William Ha j jar, Chairman of the 
School Committee, called Blake the architect of the Medfield School System. 
"His vision and leadership created the excellent schools that we have 
today." 

In keeping with Blake's high expectations for the Medfield Public 
Schools, the faculty and staff continued their efforts to provide the 
highest quality education for students at the middle level during their 
early development years. 

The following reflects some of the instructional highlights of the past 
year. The sixth grade students were involved in the Jason Project sited at 
the Galapagos Islands as part of a science program which Mrs. Roseanne Gross 
conducted. The students were able to experience first-hand the study via 
the latest technologies involving telecommunications and interactive 
satellite transmissions. 

Back at the school, parent volunteers spearheaded by Mr. Robert Gibbs 
wired all classrooms for cable, satellite and telephone connections for the 
hardware that will enable our school to connect worldwide. 

In the seventh grade, under Mr. McHugh's capable leadership, several 
curriculum efforts were created or endorsed. In foreign language, a new 
french program and text was purchased for all the students. A new Spanish 
text is being evaluated for acquisition next year. Spanish classes went to 
the Berkeley Theatre in Boston to participate in a performance of 
traditional South American dance and song. The french classes attended a 
play at the same site. The Medfield Coalition for Public Education funded a 
concert performed by Josee Vachon. She is a widely recognized singer of 
french folk songs. All foreign language students in grade seven and grade 
eight attended the concert. 

Writing was emphasized in the English curriculum. Teachers attended 
two in-service programs presented by Dr. John Collins and two follow-up 
programs at the school. Academic teachers are now coordinating writing 
assignments and are standardizing the grading of writing assignments. A 
K- 12 writing contest was established for all students. Mrs. Nelson was part 
of the coordinating committee. Winners were selected for each grade and 
each winner read their essays at a public "Celebrating Writing" program last 
spring. The Scribbler magazine was published in the spring. The CSA and 
student council provided the seed money. The "new look" magazine of student 
writing was all produced by the students on word processors. The 
illustrations were also developed in the computer room. Mrs. Miller and 
Mrs. Stabile were responsible for the professional production. 



124 






In the area of mathematics, a New England Mathematics League Contest 
was held early in the year. Winners were Elizabeth Arena, Daniel Arnold, 
Cynthia Commander, Sheila McCabe and Brian Polagye, with Daniel Arnold 
receiving the highest score. In science, the National Inventions Contest 
was run with Thaddeus linger and Jeffrey Mohan winning first place with their 
automatic vote taker. In social studies the third National Geography Bee 
was held and E. James Felton was our first qualifier for the state 
tournament. 

The eighth grade team expanded their interdisciplinary projects with 
the introduction of a unit called the "Adopt-A-Brook" Program sponsored by 
the Charles River Watershed Association. Teachers Robert Ammon, Richard 
DeSorgher, Kathleen Craig and Janice Hoffman took an extensive course at 
Tufts University over the summer to prepare for the unit. The results 
included an eighth grade canoe trip down the Charles River on which students 
wrote about the trip in their journals, conducted experiments about water 
quality and stopped at historical sites of the King Philip War. The faculty 
and staff at the Blake Middle School continued to be involved in staff 
development and in-service projects that would enhance and improve learning 
for our students. Teachers attended Cooperative Learning Workshops in an 
effort to explore more effective teaching methods. 

New Programs 

A very popular new program at our school is Activity Period. Each year 
a fall and winter set of activities is offered one period a week. Students 
are allowed to choose from among fifteen different activities with most 
students participating. This change-of-pace program excites both students 
and teachers and gets the students to explore different activities. 

Over 120 students joined the "Proud to Be Club," sponsored by Miss 
Loretta Fahey and Mr. Joseph Farroba and they are "proud to be substance 
free." The students planned and presented Substance Awareness Week in 
March. They also created a drug and alcohol rap for cable television. Many 
of the graduates of this program have become peer counselors at Medfield 
High School. 

In June Mr. Richard DeSorgher was honored by the Norfolk County 
Teachers' Association when they recognized him as "Teacher of the Year." 
The efforts of teachers like Richard DeSorgher have given students at Blake 
Middle School an opportunity to be their best. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert White 
Principal 



125 



REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As acting principal of the Dale Street School for the year 1991-1992, 
it is with much pleasure that I submit this report for the year ending 
December 31, 1991. 

Enrollment and Staff 

Enrollment figures on October 1, 1991 show 169 students in Grade 4, 136 
students in Grade 5 and 5 students in an ungraded classroom. Average class 
size in Grade 4 was 24.1, in Grade 5, 22.6. The thirteen classroom 
teachers, related area teachers and academic support staff work diligently 
to prepare the students to meet academic, social and emotional challenges. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Focus has been on invigorating the curriculum with teachers exploring 
and utilizing whole language techniques, critical thinking skills, hands-on 
math and science and social competency instruction. Weekly curriculum 
meetings are held for each grade level. Writing folders are developed for 
each child with process writing stressed. 

The Reach Out to Schools Program sponsored by Roche Brothers, in 
conjunction with the Stone Center at Wellesley College, continued with Kim 
Cave becoming a teacher-consultant and Ten" O'Brien and Carole Romaine 
initiating the program in their classrooms. The program teaches children 
effective personal communications and fosters self-esteem and the solving of 
social problems. 

Pilgrim Health Care provided a program entitled "Fit Kids" that encour- 
ages children to make healthy choices for the benefit of their physical and 
emotional well-being. 

Field trips to the Museum of Science, the Boston Symphony, Sturbridge 
Village and the Rainforest at Franklin Park Zoo continue to extend and 
enrich the curriculum. 

The Performing Arts Council provided special programs that included 
Snakes Alive, Starlab, The American Boychoir, Shi rim Klezmer, Brian Gillie 
and the History of Rock and Roll, Slim Goodbody and the Program of a Healthy 
Planet, Doug Lipman, the Storyteller and Jim Vetter, the Mime. 

R&D work included specialist scheduling, writing for learning 
disabled students and curriculum work in writing, math, science and social 
studies. 

Parent and Community Involvement 

The C.S.A. continued to be a strong and vigorous organization which provided 
many material items and programs that budget constraints have made 
impossible. Their involvement in fund- raising has been tireless. In 
addition, their volunteer program has provided lunchroom help, library 
volunteers and room parent support. The C.S.A. is greatly appreciated for 
their outstanding efforts. 



126 



The Principal Advisory Committee met on a monthly basis with meetings 
open to all. Its goal is to provide mutual communication between the 
principal and parents. Curriculum activities and concerns are discussed and 
addressed. 

The Medfield Coalition for Public Education continued to offer its 
mini -grant program for teachers. Grants were given in the areas of 
Pre-referral Strategies and Literature Guides for Chapter Books. We are 
grateful for their support that enables teachers to provide excellent educa- 
tional opportunities for the children. 

Programs and Activities 

The funding for Instrumental Music and Strings was totally cut from the 
budget. Lessons are offered before and after school on a private basis. 

The Intramural Program, under the direction of Mrs. Ten" O'Brien, 
continues. Some offerings include aerobics, cooking, quilting, basketball, 
newspaper, and arts and crafts. 

The recycling of discarded paper teaches children the value of con- 
servation in controlling environmental pollution and waste. Teachers and 
students work enthusiastically collecting and sorting paper. 

The DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) Program for fifth graders is 
offered in health classes in conjunction with the Medfield Police and 
Officer Tom McNiff. The program seeks to expand students' awareness, 
increase self-esteem and teach students positive alternatives to drugs and 
alcohol. 

The Odyssey of the Mind Program had six teams with parents serving as 
coaches. This program stresses creative problem solving and team work. 
Four teams won the right to compete in the state regional held in the 
spring. In the fall, four teams began working on the long term problems in 
preparation for the spring competitions. 

During morning announcements over the public address system, the Pledge 
of Allegiance, a moment of silence, program announcements, talks to the stu- 
dents on study skills and behavior by the principal and student 
presentations on respect and courtesy are all included. 

Other special activities are ongoing. They include field day, Luau, 
dress up days, Colonial Banquets, new student orientation, book fairs, Cul- 
tural Day and Earth Day projects. 

Although financial constraints continue to be a problem, Dale Street 
School provides fourth and fifth grade youngsters a solid program in 
academics and social and cultural experiences. The teachers, the special 
service staff and the support staff such as the secretary, the custodians, 
the cafeteria workers, all put forth extraordinary effort. Gratitude is 
expressed for the contributions of all. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Linda R. Lola 
Acting Principal 



127 



REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 



As Principal, this will be my twenty- th i rd annual report and the first 
for grades one, two and three for the year ending December 31, 1991. The 
school year opened with an enrollment of 501 students: 158 in grade one, 
183 in grade two, 152 in grade three and eight in a substantially separate 
class. 

CURRICULUM 

The Reach Out to School Program continued to be a successful experience 
for teachers and students. Additional staff members participated. Develop- 
ment of communication and social skills and improvement of self-esteem were 
goals that were achieved through the utilization of positive approaches in 
the classroom. We hope to increase and expand the program by involving the 
entire staff and to explore parental involvement. 

The reading curriculum continued to be reviewed. Alternatives to meet 
reading needs of children were explored. Methods and techniques of instruc- 
tion were discussed relevant to reading as part of the Language Arts 
Program. 

As part of the social studies curriculum the third grade visited 
Plimoth Plantation and they also participated in special activities at Rocky 
Woods in November to culminate the studies of life in early New England. 

The math and computer labs provided students with curriculum reinforce- 
ment and enrichment experiences. 

Curriculum meetings were held on a bi-weekly basis so that teachers 
could work together in planning and coordinating activities. 

Scheduled parent conferences in the fall and spring, progress reports, 
parent advisory discussion meetings and monthly newsletters hopefully 
achieved a closer relationship between school and home. 

All third grade classes were scheduled together for lunch and recess 
simultaneously so that they would have an opportunity to interact socially 
with their age group. Another purpose was to provide an easier transition 
between grades three and four. 

Physical education classes provided all students with a more varied 
program by the utilization of both gym facilities. 

The Scientist in Residence Program sponsored by the CSA involved the 
entire school. Nancy Ashkar worked with each classroom and conducted lab 
sessions for small groups to give children hands-on experiences. The 
program began in October 1991 and will end in May 1992. A future residence 
program in another area will be initiated in the fall of 1992. 

The What's It Like Program, under the direction of parent volunteers, 
provided students with an understanding of and a sensitivity to physical and 
learning disabilities. 



128 



The Wheelock library continued to be a center for students and staff. 
Scheduled classes and free time resulted in over 100 students per day 
visiting the facilities and over 100 volumes borrowed on a daily basis. 
Teachers utilized many resources such as books, magazines, tapes and videos 
to supplement the curriculum. All students in grades 1-3 developed their 
library skills, enjoyed children's literature and became excited about 
reading books. 

The Happy Program (Help A Pal Plus Yourself), initiated by Cynthia 
Larensen and Kathy Brodeur, was a third grade peer tutoring pilot program to 
help other children who needed assistance/enrichment. 

Writing Skills curriculum was revised and a collection of materials to 
aid classroom teachers in teaching writing were assembled. Jane Crandall 
directed representatives from each grade level to complete this project. 

The Banking Program continued to give children a real life experience 
in saving money. It is a volunteer activity done every Friday morning. The 
program was sponsored by CSA and Bay Bank. 

The CSA continued to be a valuable contributor to the Wheelock School 
by funding guest speakers; sponsoring student activities; and volunteering 
their services to the classroom, library and office as well as responding to 
numerous requests from staff and administration. 

The Coalition for Public Education provided funding for grants and 
workshops that contributed to the professional development of staff. 

The Performing Arts Council scheduled an excellent series of 
performances for Wheelock 1-3. They are to be complimented for their 
efforts in providing meaningful and exciting events for children. 

The year at Wheelock continues to be successful, which can be 
attributed to a dedicated and conscientious staff who are committed to the 
total development of children. The secretarial staff is to be commended in 
conducting an efficient operation in the school office. The custodial staff 
and bus personnel made their valuable contribution to the school. 

We are most grateful for the support and cooperation of parents and 
volunteers and for the School Committee and Central Administration's 
leadership and direction. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank J. Hoffman 
Principal 



129 



REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As acting principal of the Memorial School for the 1991-1992 school 
year, it gives me great pleasure to submit this report for the school year 
ending December 31, 1991. 

Enrollment and Staff 

Enrollment figures on October 1, 1991 show 188 Kindergarten students. 
There were 9 sections of Kindergarten: five a.m. and four p.m. Staff was 
increased by a half-time teacher and a half-time aide. Aides work a four 
day week. 

Curriculum & Instruction 

Kindergarten teachers are excited about whole language techniques and 
are striving to integrate them into the program. Purchase of Big Books by 
the C.S.A. and the IMC have allowed teachers to utilize the Big Books for 
motivation and for pre-reading activities. 

Greater use of math manipulatives and hands-on science activities are 
being explored. The C.S.A. will fund a science center on wheels to further 
enrich the program. 

The Alpha Time Letter People Program continues to instruct and delight 
the students. To reinforce this beginning phonics system, many activities 
involving videos, food dress-up and crafts take place. 

The Reach Out to Schools Program sponsored by Roche Brothers in 
conjunction with the Stone Center at Wellesley College continued with Vivian 
Westwater as a teacher/consultant with all other teachers initiating the 
program in their classrooms. The program teaches children to communicate 
effectively, to solve social problems in a acceptable manner and fosters 
self-esteem. 

Pilgrim Health Care provided a program entitled Fit Kids that 
encourages children to make healthy choices for the benefit of their 
physical and emotional well-being. 

Field trips to the Big Apple Circus, the Medfield Fire & Police 
Stations, Lookout Farm and rocky Woods continue to enrich the curriculum. 

The Performing Arts Council provided two special programs: Author 
Jerry Palotta and Johnny the K on the Environment. 

Parent and Community Involvement 

The C.S.A. is an integral part of the program at Memorial School. The 
interest and enthusiasm of the parents is amazing. Over fifteen standing 
committees provide academic, cultural, clerical and fund-raising support. 

The Medfield Coalition for Public Education gave Susan Green a 
mini -grant to further expand the Big Books Collection. Their support is 
much appreciated. 



130 



Activities 

The Kindergarten Program is a rich, experiential program. Numerous ac- 
tivities enhance the learning and socialization of the children. They 
include the Halloween Party, the Thanksgiving Feast, the celebration of the 
winter holidays, the Valentine Party, Special Person of the Week, various 
dress-up days, the 100th Day Celebration, May Day, the building of dinosaurs 
and visits by Dale Street students on various occasions. 

Integration with Accept Collaborative children interacting with the 
Kindergarten classes has been successful and has benefited the understanding 
of all children in respecting human resources. 

Information Night for Parents, Children's Visitation Day, Home Visita- 
tions and Open House provide parents and children with a comfortable 
acclimation to the Medfield Public School System. Newsletters and the 
Principal Advisory Council keep the channels of communication open and keep 
all informed. 

Summary 

Because of the financial support of the community in providing 
manageable class sizes and because of the generous financial support of the 
C.S.A., Memorial School provides kindergarteners with an excellent start in 
the Medfield Public School System. The teachers, the para-professionals, 
the special service staff, the secretary and the custodians are 
outstandingly excellent. Thank you to all who make Memorial School the 
happy and productive place it is. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Linda Lola 
Acting Principal 



131 



REPORT OF THE PUPIL SERVICES 
DEPARTMENT 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I am pleased to submit my 13th annual department report. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

The number of children requiring special education services continues 
to grow as does the number of children attending our schools. However, our 
staff and budget have not increased. 

Students December 1. 1990 December 1. 1991 

ages 3-5 26 26 

ages 6-17 249 259 

ages 18-21 _6 __5 

Totals 281 290 

All but nine of our students have educational programs in our schools. 
We have continued our efforts to provide internal programs for as many 
youngsters as possible because we do not like to remove children from their 
Medfield peer groups unless absolutely necessary. Also, a talented and hard 
working staff has proven that educational placements outside Medfield are 
not necessarily better; they only cost more. 

December 1. 1990 December 1. 1991 

Integrated Preschool (Sped only) 6 4 

Memorial Sub Separate 6 

Wheelock Sub Separate 5 8* 

Dale Sub Separate 4 5 

Middle School Sub Separate 7 

Outside Public Day 7 7 

Private Day 1 

Private Residential _1 _1 

29 33* 

*0ne youngster tuitioned in from a neighboring town. 

This year we have twenty-two youngsters in our integrated preschool 
program. The parents of these children pay a monthly tuition unless their 
child has been evaluated and found to have three areas of special need. In 
the case of the latter, the child's tuition is free according to regulation. 
This program, as well as the substantially separate classes above, save the 
school system approximately $187,000 in outside tuitions and transportation. 
We have also received an increase of $16,956 in grant funding for special 
needs students or a total of $105,610. These funds are used almost 
exclusively to fund salaries for two professional staff and five aides. 

Residents interested in being members of the Pupil Services or Early 
Childhood Advisory Councils should call 359-7135 for further information. 
Anyone interested in volunteering their time to work with special needs 
children are urged to call the same number. 



132 



GUIDANCE SERVICES 

Our three guidance counselors have continued to work with students in 
grades 6-12 in guidance groups with a set curriculum. Students are also 
seen individually by appointment. 

The Guidance Information System (G.I.S.) computer program continues to 
be available to students and community residents. High school counselors 
and students report that the data received about colleges, financial aid and 
occupational /vocational information is both current and invaluable. Surely 
this must account for its broad use at our high school. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

Four full/part-time nurses continue to be responsible for the provision 
of health services in our five schools. These dedicated women devote their 
attention to services, education and a healthy school environment. 

Our nurses are responsible for reviewing the health records for all 
students since we must uphold stringent State requirements for 
immunizations, physicals and lead paint screening. 

Volunteer nurses, Dr. Stewart Galeucia, optometric students and the 
Lions Club provided vision and hearing screenings for 179 incoming 
kindergartners. Our nurses and many additional trained volunteers also 
screened all of our students in grades 1-12. Of the 1807 screened, 120 
students were referred for further evaluation. 

Six hundred and fifty-five students in grades five through nine par- 
ticipated in postural screening by our trained physical educators. Ninety 
were referred to our nurses for re-screening. Twenty-three of these 
children were referred to their pediatricians for further study. Twelve 
were found to have scoliosis. Two of these children were recommended for 
surgery. 

We continue to be extremely grateful to the Lions Club, Dr. Galeucia, 
students from the School of Optometry and the many volunteers who assisted 
us in completing the State mandated screenings throughout the school 
system. Without their generosity, we would be unable to fulfill 
requirements. 

PERSONNEL 

Mrs. Sylvia Pal I is retired after completing seventeen years of 
dedicated service to Middle School children with learning disabilities. 
While Mrs. Pal I is enjoys her retirement in New Hampshire, Ms. Kathryn 
Walunas has been hired to fill this position. 

Mrs. Erin Burke taught an elementary substantially separate class for 
two years. She and her husband moved to Minnesota during the summer. Ms. 
Ann Coffey has been hired to teach this class at Dale St. School. 

Mrs. Johanna Herren worked as a speech and language clinician two days 
a week between the Middle and High Schools. This position has been 

I eliminated with two of our other therapists expanding their workloads to 
include these services. 
133 



Mrs. Susan Foster, formerly the full time psychologist at Wheelock 
School, took a position in a nearby community when her Wheelock position was 
reduced to three days a week. Ms. Beth Melvin is currently working with 
these primary youngsters, their parents and teachers. 

Mrs. Elaine McCarthy is assisting the students assigned to the new spe- 
cial needs class taught by Mrs. Judith Robinson at the Middle School. 

Mrs. Claudia Michaels-Brodsky adopted Alex last June and is currently 
on a child rearing leave. Ms. Juliana Twombley is working with the special 
needs youngsters assigned to the resource room at the Dale St. School. 

In closing, I would like to express my appreciation to all who provided 
support and assistance to department staff and the children they serve. I 
am particularly grateful to the members of the Pupil Services and Early 
Childhood Advisory Councils for their commitment and input. Their ideas and 
vision have been most helpful and well received. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lois E. Lambert 

Director of Pupil Services 



REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD 
ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

January 15, 1991 was the beginning of the second semester of the 
1990-1991 Adult Education Program. A total of eleven classes in nine 
different courses were continued by the Director. The courses were Drivers 
Education (2), Aerobics (2), Men's Basketball (2), Painting, Yoga, 
Volleyball, Golf, Old World Santas and Cut and Pierced Lampshades. 

The 1991-92 Adult Education Program had an initial offering of eighteen 
different courses, thirteen courses were established with double offerings 
in Drivers Education and Aerobics. Two hundred sixty-eight adults were 
registered for the fall program. A new course offered was Tap Dancing. 
"Lowering the Cost of Your Child's College Education," "Personal Financial 
Planning," and "I Do Want A Perfect Wedding" were three special 
mini -offerings. 

The Adult Education Program continues to be self-supporting. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Cuoco 

Director of Adult Education 



134 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my seventh annual report as the Medfield Public 
Schools' Director of Athletics for the year ending December 31, 1991. Through 
the interscholastic athletic program, we provide our youth the opportunity to 
experience and develop in a positive, disciplined atmosphere. It is my great 
pleasure to report that seventy- three percent of the entire High School stu- 
dent body participated in athletics during this past year. This ever growing 
statistic reveals the significant role athletics play in the total educational 
process of Medfield's children. 

Boys and girls interscholastic teams were offered at three levels during 
the past year. Following is the entire athletic coaching staff by season: 



Basketball (boys) 

Basketball (girls) 

Cheering 

Ice Hockey 

Indoor Track (boys) 

Indoor Track (girls) 



WINTER 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Daniel Hanlon 
Herb Grace 
Michael Mason 

Thomas Cowell 
Susan Cowell 
Pi a Kunzig 

Susan Medina 

Mark Trivett 

Stuart Palmer 

Michael Slason 



SPRING 



Baseball 



Softball 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Richard Nickerson 
Martin Salka 
Herb Grace 

Suzanne Moulton 
Whitney Hag ins 
Stasia Peters 



SPRING 



I Tennis (boys) 
1 Tennis (girls) 

Track and Field (boys) 
I Track and Field (girls) 

Track and Field (Asst.) 



Vincent Joseph 
Peter Goodall 
Edward Rock 
Lisa Bolanis 

Nei I DuRoss 



135 



FALL 



Cheering 
Cross Country 
Field Hockey 

Football 

Soccer (boys) 
Soccer (girls) 
Volleyball 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

Varsity 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 



Susan Medina 

Michael Kramer 

Loretta Fahey 
Pauline Carey 

Vincent Joseph 
Michael Slason 
Wi lliam Young 
Joseph Farroba 
Michael Ottaviani 

Edward Rock 
Wi lliam Pope 

Dawn Young 
Susan Cowell 

John Hastings 
Lisa Bushnell 



All of our interscholastic teams participate in the Tri -Valley League 
which consists of Ashland, Bellingham, Dover-Sherborn, Holliston, Hopkinton, 
Medfield, Medway, Mi 1 1 is and Westwood. Medfield High School is ranked fifth 
in the TVL in total enrollment, grades 9-12. The league is highly competitive 
in all sports with representative teams consistently successful in state 
tournament play. This past school year, Medfield placed second for all 
schools in Eastern Massachusetts Division IV in competition for the presti- 
gious Dalton Award given annually by the Boston Globe . Criteria is based on 
the number of varsity sports offered and the winning percentage of both boys 
and girls teams in those sports. This was the highest Medfield finish in the 
seventeen years that that award has been presented. This is a wonderful trib- 
ute to our student athletes and to the outstanding job our coaching staff has 
done. 

We begin our athletic highlights with the winter season, 1990-91. Our 
girls indoor track team went undefeated (6-0), winning the TVL and placing 
fourth in the Class D state meet. Senior Meaghan McNulty was the Class D 
State Champion in the mile. Our boys indoor team finished second in the 
league meet and five members were named to the TVL All Star Team. Our young 
ice hockey team, playing well under first year coach Mark Trivett, came in at 
5-6-1 in the league. . .good enough for fourth place. The Big Blue, our boys 
basketball team, finished with a strong 10-10 record. After knocking talented 
Ashland out of tournament qualification, they nearly won the Medfield Winter 
Hoop Classic played during February vacation. Our girls basketball team won 
the East Bridgewater Christmas Tournament and finished the regular season at 
15-5 and progressed all the way to the South Sectional Finals of the state 
tournament. 

The spring of 1991 was very successful. Our tennis programs both came up 
with stellar seasons: the boys at 14-2 and the girls 11-5. Both qualified for 
tourney play. (The girls for the seventh consecutive year.) Captain Jim 
Foli no was named a TVL All Star for the fourth year in a row. The girls track 
team won the league title once again going undefeated (17-0 over the past two 
springs). Along the way, they set four Medfield records and one TVL record. 
Our boys program finished a strong second at 6-2 while qualifying eight team 



136 






members for state level competition. The baseball team missed tournament 
play this year but played the spoiler defeating strong Bellingham and Medway 
teams in late season match-ups. Softball was second in the TVL, finished at 
14-4 and qualified for the state tournament for the fourteenth consecutive 
year and advanced to the sectional semi-finals. 

The fall of 1991 proved to be a great one for our boys soccer program. 
Finishing third in the talented TVL (10-5-1), they advanced to the sectional 
quarter finals where they eventually were defeated by Sacred Heart of Kingston 
after four overtimes and a shoot-out. Jim Martin was named an All-State 
player. 

Girls soccer welcomed a new face, Dawn Young, who took over the reins 
from longtime coach Pat Scarsciotti. Dawn (MHS Class of 1983), captains Karen 
Molinaro and Tracey Powers and the team enjoyed two fine wins over Mi 1 1 is and 
narrowly missed defeating powerful Holliston under the lights. Our young 
football team posted three shutouts and thrilled the Thanksgiving day crowd 
with a great second half comeback vs Dover-Sherborn. Sophomore place kicker, 
Keith Angel I, was named to both the Middlesex News and Milford Daily News 
All -Star Teams. Field Hockey narrowly missed tournament qualification, ending 
their season at 7-5-4. Goalkeeper Alissa DuBrow and the team posted nine 
shutouts along the way. Our boys and girls cross country teams were again 
successful, both finishing high in the conference meet. Captain Ryan Autry 
broke the Medfield course record in an early season meet. The volleyball pro- 
gram continues to improve giving league powers a strong challenge match after 
match. It was a young team that looks to be highly competitive in '92. 

The three sports recognition evenings in November, March and May played 
to full houses and were well received. The annual All -Sports Athletic Ban- 
quet sponsored by the Medfield School Boosters was held in late May. Medfield 
High School athletic "Wall of Fame" 1992 inductees included: Philip Burr, 
Class of 1947; Howard Kelley, '61; Edward Abar, '71 and Cindy Floser, '81. 
Each inductee (Maryann Abar for her husband, Ed) briefly addressed the audi- 
ence of nearly five hundred student-athletes and parents. At the banquet, in 
addition to the individual sport MVP awards, Stacey Lengyel and Jim Folino 
were named the 1990-91 Scholar-Athlete recipients. At the June graduation ex- 
ercises, Meaghan McNulty and David Foley were named recipients of the School 
Boosters Spirit Award. The Robert Porack Memorial Basketball Scholarships 
given by Medfield Youth Basketball Association (M.Y.B.A.) were awarded to 
Chen" Evans and Jason Nash. The Robert Belmont Memorial Track Spirit Award 
was presented to Brendan Sullivan. 

Tri Valley League all-star selections for 1991 are as follows: 

Boys Basketball Dan Spaeth 

Peter 0' Donovan 
Jim Martin 

Girls Basketball Chen" Evans 

Kathy Christy 
Michelle Scecina 

Ice Hockey Brian McAvoy 

Peter Gambardella 






Boys Indoor Track Ed Cosgrove 

Jim Imbert 
Rich Utaegbulam 
Brendan Sullivan 
Ryan Autry 



137 



Girls Indoor Track 

Baseball 
Softball 



Girls Tennis 
Boys Tennis 
Boys Track 

Girls Track 

Cross Country 
Field Hockey 

Football 
Boys Soccer 

Girls Soccer 
Volleyball 



Col leen Fitzpatrick 
Meaghan McNulty 
Katie Fitzpatrick 
Irene Krommydas 

Rob 0' Sullivan 

Stacey Lengyel 
Cheri Evans 
Sue Bartlett 
Aimee Sabourin 
Michelle Scecina 

Kelly Croke 
A I lison Dunn 
Melissa Carroll 
Jill Ikenberry 

Jim Foli no 
Mike Kaufman 
Andy Harris 
Brandon Cutter 

Brendan Sullivan 
Jim Imbert 
Peter 0' Donovan 
Ryan Autry 

Colleen Fitzpatrick 
Irene Krommydas 
Katie Fitzpatrick 

Ryan Autry 
Sarah Oscarson 

Sarah Dolan 
Karen Kraus 
Nicki Bois 
Erin Ford 

Keith Angel I 

Jim Martin 
Glen Panciocco 
Greg Miner 
Wes Behn 

Karen Molinaro 
Stacy Benhardt 

Sangeeta Uelankiwar 



Our fall and winter cheering teams, under the guidance of Susan Medina, 
were once again talented and creative. As always, they contributed to the 
athletic program's success by providing support and enthusiasm to our ath- 
letes, spectators and the community. Their cheering and dance routines, year 
after year, remain unsurpassed in the Tri -Valley League. The Homecoming Pep 
Rally organized by the fall cheering team once again brought rave reviews 
from everyone in attendance. 



38 



I would be remiss without a special thank you to all who helped make 
Med-Field Lights a reality. Through your generous donations, positive atti- 
tude and perseverance, Medfi eld's children will be proudly watched "Under the 
Lights" for years to come. The driving forces behind this campaign from its 
beginning in late December until job completion in early September were: Brian 
and Maryann Callahan, Bill Craig, Bob Dennehey, Larry Dunn, and Phil and 
Gloria Kelly. To you seven, a very special thank you from all the Warriors! 

This concludes my seventh annual report of the Director of Athletics. I 

would like to thank the School Committee, the administration, Medfield School 

Boosters and the community for all of their support throughout the year ending 
December 31, 1991. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas E. Cowell 
Director of Athletics 




lig Blue Basketball Captains, 
Greg Miner and Jim Martin 



139 



REPORT OF THE FOOD SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 



It is with pleasure that I submit this Annual Report for the Food Service 
Department for the year ending December 31, 1991. 

Government mandate stipulates that a "Type A" lunch be served daily. 
This lunch requires certain components that I adhere to with my daily menus. 
As I write menus I try and balance homemade products as well as convenience 

foods. 

I have found that students prefer some meals more than others; therefore, 
I try and balance the week so that my cash flow continues to come in. The 
High School students are more receptive to new items so their lunches are more 
varied. I find the elementary students feel more comfortable with less vari- 
ety and more "finger foods." 

At the High School and Middle School I have incorporated weekly "spe- 
cials." These "specials" are extra servings so that the lunch is a larger 
portion which helps promote sales. I feel that I have been able to offer 
larger quantities and more appealing lunches this fall as most of the foods 
and supplies are on bids. These bids are obtained through the TEC Collabora- 
tive, as well as bids I obtained myself. My vendors are more competitive this 
year; therefore, I am able to offer the students a better quality product. 
The Government sells us Commodity foods. These are balanced with purchases 
from vendors. The Commodity foods are very good and the Bureau of Nutrition 
has improved its offering. 

Promoting good health and nutrition has always been a problem with school 
aged children. In our kitchens we oven bake." We do not fry. We offer the 
students three types of milk: whole milk, Nuform and 1/2% fat chocolate milk. 

The prepaid meal ticket is offered by the year, half year and monthly. 
This continues to be a success and I feel it is very helpful to working 
parents. 

Salad bars are offered daily at the High School and are a success when on 
the menu at the elementary level. As a snack item, the High School and Middle 
School daily offer large "Fenway Pretzels" that are nutritionally good for the 
students. During this past year both the High School and Middle School had 
two holiday buffets and a combined cookout in which the employees cooked on 
outdoor grills. This is more work for the staff but does offer variety to the 
students. 

A new experience this past year was an intern student from Framingham 
State College. This student was a nutrition major and we all benefited from 

her knowledge. 

In September the High School and Middle School offered a breakfast before 
school. Due to lack of interest this was cancelled at the Middle School by 
the end of September. We still offer a "serve yourself" breakfast at the High 
School . 



140 



In February I was told that the Food Service Department was to be 
completely self-sufficient as of September 1991. I seriously needed financial 
changes for the 1991-1992 school year. This was accomplished by the 
following: 






- breakfast at the High School 

- raising the cost of lunch systemwide 

- vending machines at the High School and Middle School for evenings 
and weekends 

- employee restructure: All employees were cut in hours for the fall 
of 1991. This was difficult but necessary for the program. Due to 
attrition and the systemwide rescheduling I now feel we are where 
we should be for the size town and the number of schools we need 
to have staffed. 

I am very pleased with the way the employees have adjusted to this new 
program. As of today, we are on target financially and I feel we will accom- 
plish the task the School Committee requested of Food Service. 



Income 



Expenses 



Lunch Receipts 
Functions 
Government Claim 



$170,805.48 
24,907.92 
33,197.27 

$228,910.67 



Food & Supplies 
Labor 



$115,341.64 

104.529.38 

$219,871.02 



Respectfully submitted, 

Sharon Martin 

Food Service Director 




Ralph Uheelock students enjoying a 
Thanksgiving dinner. 



141 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 
OF PLANT MANAGEMENT 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Nineteen hundred and ninety-one was a period of discovery, learning, 
change and satisfaction. 

Personnel 

The majority of our maintenance and custodial staff are long term 
experienced employees. On the positive side they possess a wealth of 
knowledge and practical experience which they apply to the daily care of our 
facilities. The down side is that earned time off, vacations, sick leave, 
etc. currently total over 400 days annually. Days which must be covered to 
maintain a minimum level of services. Cases of serious illness and long 
term hospitalizations during the year, together with bouts with the flu, 
have seriously cut staff availability. Fortunately we have been able to 
recruit several part-time employees, to augment regular employees working 
overtime, thus providing essential custodial coverage. 

The addition of a Maintenance Specialist on July 1st has contributed 
significantly to the efficiency and effectiveness of the department. 

Workload, Maintenance 

Broader use of written work orders has improved management's ability to 
identify, assign, track, support and report facility maintenance activities. 
Nine hundred and ten (910) individual work orders were submitted during the 
year, for maintenance department action. These included moving chairs and 
platforms, roof repairs, reconfiguring educational facilities and all sorts 
of carpentry, masonry and mechanical repairs including repair of kitchen, 
heating, cooling and ventilation equipment. Activity not covered by work 
orders include routine support functions like distribution of supplies, 
moving records, furniture and mail, maintaining grounds, walks, roads and 
sports areas. 

Workload, Custodial 

There has been no reduction in the custodial workload. Buildings are 
older, facility use has increased with school, community and private ac- 
tivities occurring beyond usual school hours. To cope with this workload we 
moved toward standardization of custodial procedures and supplies; obtained 
instruction by specialist; placed brand new, equipment into service and 
implemented an equipment maintenance program. Coupled with the "can do" at- 
titude of the custodial staff and support of school principals, there is a 
noticeable improvement in facility appearance. 

Capital Projects 

- Chair lift at the Thomas A. Blake Middle School has been installed 
and is operational. 

- Auditorium/gym floor at the Memorial School was stripped and re- 
covered with new tile. 

- Exterior door replacement projects at the Dale Street and Memorial 
Schools are underway and should be completed in January 1992. Re- 
vising the specifications to broaden the potential bidder base and 
to accommodate recently enacted law and regulation requirements de- 
layed the project, but resulted in substantial savings. The bidding 



142 



process and vendor shipping delays also poshed the completion date 
forward. 

- Retrofitting High School boilers to natural gas fuel is progressing 
and scheduled for change over the fourth week in January 1992. Oil 
tank removal will be undertaken as soon as the fuel is used up. 

- The bid process is getting under way for the Ralph Wheelock School 
chair lift. 

Major Changes 

The change which has, and will continue to have, a significant impact 
on the school system's economic and environmental health is the return of 
the management of facility environmental systems to school maintenance 
personnel. 

All vendors dealing with plant management have been reviewed and 
evaluated; 1) as to quality, availability and price of service or product, 
2) ability to serve as a resource for technical advice. Some changes have 
been made. New vendors have also been added as we attempt to buy cost 
effectively from sources as close as possible to the point of manufacture. 

Central storage and computerized inventory was established for 
custodial and other maintenance supplies. Reduced inventory, 
standardization of supplies, management of purchasing, distribution and 
monitoring of use are now possible. 

Purchasing chemical concentrates and dispensing them with automatic 
dilution equipment into recyclable 5 gallon dispensing containers has 
provided the spectrum of solutions required for basic cleaning and 
sanitizing at significant savings, also eliminating many disposable 
containers from the waste stream. 

Facility inspections are regularly conducted with written reports to 
the administration, building principal and head custodian. Work orders are 
issued immediately for any deficiency not already under work order 
scheduling. 

A general cleanup of all facilities was implemented and is ongoing. 
Equipment, maintenance materials, furniture, educational support items and 
supplies which are surplus or in need of repair are repaired and/or 
relocated to a place of need. Gifts of surplus furniture have been obtained 
from several area companies. These have been distributed throughout the 
system. Items not used have been transferred to other town departments for 
their needs. 

A major overhaul of all facility heating plants has been accomplished, 
beginning with a thorough cleaning of boilers, flues and boiler rooms. 
Ventilation units have been completely inspected, burned out motors 
replaced, power transmission belts replaced, ducts, screens and filters 
cleaned or replaced. 

Two lighting projects, High School cafeteria and Dale Street School 
gym, were undertaken to correct safety problems, improve lighting and reduce 
energy costs. Both projects are calculated to pay back within four years. 
Pay back will be sooner at current rates of use. 

Mandated ASHRA three year inspection has been completed. 
Specifications are being prepared for addressing needs to ensure continued 
regulatory compliance and maintenance of a healthy environment. 



143 



Thomas A. Blake Middle School gym was refurbished by coordinating use 
of maintenance, contractor and correctional department labor using school 
department supplies and materials. 

Emergency exit signs in the older section of the Memorial School have 
been replaced with units to satisfy building and life safety codes. 

Expense reduction projects have been implemented wherever possible; 
e.g., changing single sheet toilet paper dispensers to rolls provided 
savings in paper costs sufficient to pay for the new dispensers in less than 
a year. 

Budgets 

FY91-92 appropriations were below the previous fiscal period. Cuts 
were made in confidence that we could be more fiscally responsible and 
provide an acceptable level of services. This assumption would not have 
been made had we known what we know now. Fortunately we have the personnel, 
new supply sources, access to technical expertise and a staff devotion to 
duty which has allowed us to undertake major repairs and equipment 
maintenance projects at absolute minimum cost. The unknowns, which can 
occur at any time in buildings ranging in age from 20 to 50 years, boggle 
the mind. Rotting pipes, stuck valves, roofing, blisters, pump failures, 
burned out motors, aging electrical apparatus, exuberant student population 
and changing regulations are only a few sources of problems which make 
budget planning difficult at best. 

Conclusion 

The Director of Plant Management is a full time position occupied by a 
half-time person, thus our many success stories for 1991 are the result of 
Plant Management staff taking an active interest in their individual assign- 
ments and being fully supported by the school administration and its staff. 
I look for this arrangement to produce more success stories in 1992. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Austin C. "Buck" Buchanan 
Director of Plant Management 



144 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1991 



145 



BIRTHS RECORDED IN MEDFIELD IN 1990 RECEIVED LATE 



DATE 

October 7 

December 10 

December 10 



CHILD'S NAME 
Daniel James Palombo 
Luke Michael Sullivan 
Rebecca Leigh Sullivan 



PARENTS 

John D. and Barbara J. Donnelly 
John L. and Cathleen Cambalik 
John L. and Cathleen Cambalik 



BIRTHS RECORDED IN MEDFIELD 19 91 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 14 
Jan. 18 
Jan. 20 
Jan. 22 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 30 
Feb. 11 
Feb. 14 
Feb. 18 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 23 
Feb. 24 
Feb. 28 
Mar. 1 
Mar. 2 
Mar. 4 
Mar. 5 
Mar. 11 
Ma. 12 
Mar. 19 
Mar. 22 
Mar. 23 
Mar. 25 
Mar. 27 
Mar. 28 
Mar. 29 
Mar. 31 
Apr. 3 
Arr. 3 
Apr. 5 
Apr. 10 
Apr. 16 
Apr. 17 
Apr. 18 
Apr. 22 
Apr. 22 
Apr. 24 
Apr. 27 
Apr. 29 
Apr. 29 



Julie Starr LaFreniere 
Marisa Lie Michelson 
Ross Jerome Gibson 
Peter Fargo Hadayia 
Caroline Brenda Saba 
John Joseph Doyle, IV 
Margaret Cargill Woodruff 
Nicholas Fair Nowak 
Marie Alessanbra Lanza 
Amanda Luanne Festa 
Zachary Moses Twombly 
Michael Stephen Hayes 
Hilary Cull en Budwey 
Eric George Boole 
Audrey Davidson Sullivan 
James Michael Fitzgerald, III 
Jennifer Marie Fromen 
Kaitlin Marianna Kimball 
Emma Alexandra Hughes 
Sarah Meredith Piper-Goldberg 
Nicholas William Logie 
Matthew John Brennan 
Patrick Scott McFetridge 
Alison Dawn Be r lent 
Gregory James Kilcommons 
Elizabeth Hayden Matt i son 
Thomas Dillon Cabot 
Bennett James Yetra 
Connor George Hatten 
Gregory Leon Linse 
Blake Anderson Barker 
Michael Charles O'Neil 
Rachel Katrine Simon 
Jessica Ann Hodge 
David Anthony Franchi, Jr. 
Peter Francis Dolan, Jr. 
Casey Jean Lonabocker 
Christopher John Paul Thomas 
Alexandra Marie Thompson 
Charles Bradford Masters 
Thomas Michael Lueders 
Meagan Emond Reardon 
Kerry Anne Clark 
Andrew Michael Giammarco 
Benjamin White Hurwitz 
John Michael O'Connell 
Christopher Edward Cashdan 
Gregory Cash Muir, Jr. 
Jaclyn Boyd 



Richard J. and Carol E. Holm 
Peter M. and Lisa C. Wood 
Ian J. and Lisa D. McCubbin 
Peter W. and Lisa M. Corbett 
Philip P. and Joyce E. Mattingly 
John J. and Jill Hurite 
Douglas G. and Gretchen Congleton 
Thomas A. and Margaret D. Fair 
Mark J. and Mary-Elizabeth Iosua 
Michael A. and Martha Burn 
Matthew A. and Denise F. Hillyard 
Stephen M. and Maureen Corcoran 
Thomas E. and Sandra Cullen 
Philip G. and Kathryn L. Violick 
Timothy P. and Wendy Miller 
James M. and Patricia S. Szymanski 
Gregory J. and Deborah J. Fulmer 
Neil A. and Linda A. Najarian 
Timothy K. and Ann E. Thomas 
Allen and Alison I. Piper 
William T. and Maria E. Licopli 
John F. and Deborah L. Fitzgerald 
Scott A. and Lisa Gaffney 
Bruce D. and Jane Goldstein 
James W. and Barbara A. Shannon 
Robert H and Susan Baldwin 
Paul C. and Jane Driscoll 
Richard L. and Karen Craven 
William J. and Marjorie Walsh 
Douglas H. and Donnalynne M. Leon 
Craig A. and Robin Cope I and 
James F. and Sonia A. Grace 
Ross W. and Kathy Russo 
Todd E. and Jodi E. Shuman 
David A. and Teresa A. Rufo 
Peter F. and Sheree A. Morgan 
Thomas M. and Lynn A. Beattie 
Paul J. and Diane M. Solander 
Michael C. and Tanya N. Savenko 
Jeffrey A. and Lucy L. Bird 
Michael E. and Connie L. O'Neill 
John J. and Suzanne P. Merrill 
David A. and Marianne Swift 
Patrick J. and Nancy M. Pompeo 
William and Janet White 
Brian D. and Lynn Gilmore 
Daniel M. and Allisyn Gras 
Gregory C. and Linda J. Paver 
Chandler D. and Sandi J. Suva I sky 



146 



Births 1991 Continued; 



Apr. 30 Jonathan James Liang 

May 1 Eliza Bordley Lewis 

May 2 Jennifer Anne Thomas 

May 7 Courtney Clifford Patch 

May 8 Daniel Clay Hechler 

May 9 Lindsay Marie Tissot 

May 13 Philip Newton Thompson 

May 19 Christopher David MacCready 

May 22 Matthew Charles Johnson 

May 22 Eric Leigh Cadigan 

May 22 Eric James Donald 

May 27 Meaghan Elizabeth F. H ink is 

June 2 John Casey Jordan 

June 3 Emily Anne Johannessen 

June 4 Galen Locke Farrar 

June 5 Kristen Brauer 

June 5 Melanie Amanda Grafton 

June 7 Kevin James Schmidt 

June 7 William Brokaw Schaub 

June 8 El lie Carolyn Goldense 

June 12 Catherine Ann Telia 

June 13 Brian Holmes O'Loughlin 

June 15 Shannon Ray Jones 

June 16 Daniel la Lee Derenzo 

June 17 Lauren Carolyn Ciampa 

June 20 Adam Richard Cheung 

June 24 Nicholas Angelo Calotta 

June 26 Jocelyn Nicole St. Martin 

June 30 Elizabeth Josephine Pietsch 

July 8 Benjamin James Hogan 

July 18 Kevin Martin Franklin 

July 18 Cameron Scott Colwell 

July 20 Michael Timothy Dolan 

July 22 Michael Jacob O'Malley 

July 25 Nicola C. McFarland Tesorero 

Aug. 2 Alyssa Ann Lurie 

Aug. 2 Christopher John Naro 

Aug. 4 Kathryn Jane Milaschewski 

Aug. 7 Lee Edward McCarthy 

Aug. 11 Patrickk James Keleher 

Aug. 13 Devin Christopher Murray 

Aug. 15 Nicholas Michael Raffone 

Aug. 18 Cameron Andrew Wild 

Aug. 20 Amy Marie Jaques 

Aug. 25 Stephen Michael Bower 

Aug. 30 Alexandra Isabel le Albano 

Sept. 2 Jacqueline Ann Thomas 

Sept. 3 Kathleen Wilson Wholley 

Sept. 11 Alexa Elena Pinciaro 

Sept. 12 Angela Joy Bodozian 

Sept. 14 Kaylin Marguerite Beauregard 

Sept. 14 Katherine Elizabeth Jordan 

Sept. 14 Michael Nicholas Spin" to 

Sept. 15 Michael Danian French 

Sept. 19 Meghan Alyssa Duby 

Sept. 19 Joseph Dillon Holman 



Jinc-Chau and Ming-Chu Chiang 

Arthur L. and Ellen B. Gibbs 

Brian R. and Nancy R. Derleth 

Jonathan B. and Megan Fox 

Michael J. and Laura Baber 

Roger L. and Linda T. Ricci 

Newton H. and Kathleen A. Cumnings 

David A. and Joann Carvey 

Douglas M. and Nanette White 

John B. and Deborah J. Guzelf 

Thomas P. and Patricia A. Crozier 

Stephen J. and Madeleine A. Hagen 

Brian J. and Holly A. Rodgers 

Stephen P. and Mary E. Love 

Stephen A. and Dorothy Clarke 

Paul G. and Diane L. Prophet 

Richard W. and Jennifer L. Robinson 

James B. and Anne E. McElroy 

Richard F. and Susan Brandenburg 

Paul M. and Virginia A. Macaskill 

Ralph J. and Nancy M. Miels 

Gerald W. and Kim E. Holmes 

Robert N. and Cheryl L. Seelig 

Jay J. and Lisa L. Vespa 

John F. and Carla E. Philopoulos 

Malcolm A. and Claudine L. Caggiano 

Gregory T. and Anita M. Meluso 

John J. and Karen A. McGuinness 

Robert B. and Elaine J. Rosati 

Paul F. and Tracey Tiffin 

Steven N. and Claudia D. Svorinic 

Scott W. and Julie A. Eisielwiski 

Timothy W. and Dawn M. Wolinski 

William A. and Mary S. Sortor 

Paul J. and Paula T. McFarland 

Dana J. and Peggy A. Bennett 

Philip J. and Jo Anne M. Ficcardi 

William H. and Jane J. Story 

John L. and Linda J. Donnelly 

William F. and Ma rye 1 1 en C. Lyons 

Christopher F. and Katherine Manganiello 

Lawrence M. and Heidi E. Hanson 

Thomas M. and Cynthia K. Brock 

Anthony J. and Sandra L. Mackie 

Mark S. and Ellen M. Donovan 

Peter J. and Christine Walton 

David S. and Kelly M. Simcock 

William L. and Susan Lee 

John W. and Patricia A. Ciampa 

Harry S. and Kimberli A. Haigh 

George H. and Kathleen Simard 

Charles H. and Kathleen S. Sullivan 

Nicholas and Lynne Chandler 

David D. and Nina Brainin 

Mark A. and Karen Janet Flaxington 

Brian M. and Deborah Sandmeyer 



147 



Births 1991 Continued: 



Sept. 20 
Sept. 21 
Sept. 23 
Sept. 23 
Sept. 23 
Sept. 24 
Sept. 26 
Sept. 28 
Sept. 28 
Sept. 29 
Oct. 4 
Oct. 9 
Oct. 9 
Oct. 29 



Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 

Nov. 8 

Nov. 10 

Nov. 10 

Nov. 14 

Nov. 17 

Nov. 18 

Nov. 18 

Nov. 21 

Nov. 22 

Nov. 27 

Nov. 27 

Nov. 28 

Dec. 2 

Dec. 4 

Dec. 12 

Dec. 18 

Dec. 19 



Madeleine Ellen Kokos 
Caitlin Rusconi Fisher 
Rachel Marie Ferullo 
Rebecca Jayne Patt 
John Frederick Siino 
Holly Ann Oppel 
Susan Elizabeth Herlihy 
Jeffrey Alexander Brown 
Maura Jacqueline Hall 
Megan Nancy Sprague 
El ie Andre Maalouf 
Christine Margaret Stamer 
Brian Donald Wheeler 
Keith Cushman Bennett 
John Xavier Welter 
Andrew Joseph Nugent 
Korey Paul Kuzmich 
Amanda Elise Durocher 
Erin Colleen McCormick 
Rebecca Marie Jaques 
Mary Livingston Kinsella 
Jeremy Taylor Berwaldt 
Elisabeth Rose Lubiak 
Kevin Patrick Geary 
Scott Kane Goodwin 
Kerry Elizabeth Bowles 
Alexander Charles Barry 
Scott Richard Friedman 
Erik Michael Lindgren 
Nell O'Brien Goddard 
William Paul Alfano 
Craig Andrew Fuglestad 
Stephanie Elizabeth Boudreau 
Kevan Caswell lander 
Bryn Marie Gallagher 



Gerald G. and Ellen Rogers 
Mark L. and Lucille K. Eusconi 
Charles F. and Mary C. Dockery 
Neil R. and Patricia A. Bencsics 
Frederick J. and Suzanne E. Ledwith 
Robert J. and Heidi A. Ferguson 
Mark L. and Elizabeth A. Broderick 
Jeffrey S. and Alison E. Gilbert 
Timothy P. and Christine M. Mullen 
John M. and Eileen Cornwell 
Andre G. and Raymonde A. Serghani 
Michael J. and MaryAlice L. Silva 
Gary C. and Alice Frankenhauser 
Jonathan and Linda J.Suttenf ield 
John H. and Ellen M.Brown 
Tim Andrew and Susan Lyons 
Paul and Karen A. Bagley 
James R. and Teresa Hickey 
Stephen and Mary C. Chandler 
Allen N. and Tracy A. Arcuri 
William A. and Eleanor Watson 
Stephen R. and Deborah K. Gil lis 
Stephen J. and Diane Davignon 
Edward T. and Carol R. Lavin 
Scott D. and Nancy Kane 
Edward J. and Mary E. Dumas 
Francis E. and Sherri M. Mai da 
Paul J. and Cathryn D. Abrams 
Michael J. and Bernadette Henderson 
Bronson and Susan Hacopian 
Paul J. and Kathleen Fox 
Mark R. and Joanne M. Sadoski 
James F. and Marian S. Santucci 
Lars W. and Marybeth Maguire 
Shawn Leo and Katherine De Brock 



148 



DEATHS RECORDED IN MEDFIELD IN 19 91 



DATE 



NAME 



AGE 



CAUSE 



Jan. 


7 


Robert Edward Meaney 


74 


Jan. 


23 


Everett J. Hassell, Sr. 


96 


Jan. 


27 


Norma Joan Ryan 


64 


Feb. 


9 


Clara D. Pol i 


62 


Mar. 


6 


Theresa Mary Gallo 


88 


Mar. 


21 


James Randolp Holt 


60 


Mar. 


25 


Mary Muriel Chase 


94 


Mar. 


27 


Matthew J. Sullivan 


23 


Mar. 


28 


Roza Berne 


73 


Mar. 


29 


Linda Marie Telia 


4 


Apr. 


4 


Ruth Mespilli 


81 


Apr. 


7 


Ivalieu C. Packard 


89 


Apr. 


11 


William Anthony Donnelly 


60 


Apr. 


12 


Russell Cooke 


67 


Apr. 


16 


Lola Marie Travers 


62 


Apr. 


29 


Louise F.A. Ehnes 


87 


May 


2 


Susan Ellen Schortmann 


34 


May 


3 


Aida DiRico 


93 


May 


5 


George A. Stewart 


72 


May 


10 


Joseph L. Marcionette, Jr. 


90 


May 


18 


Richard Gerald Connors 


63 


May 


24 


Timothy Patrick McCarthy 


37 


June 


7 


Joseph Richard Stoddard 


71 


June 
July 


13 


Michael William Tammaro 


72 


4 


Anne Cecilia Rubino 


73 


July 


9 


Paul Patrick Hayes 


32 


July 


18 


Frank Ralston Roberts 


64 


July 25 


Thomas Vincent Sweeney 


84 


Aug. 


5 


Sophie M. Taraska 


84 


Aug. 


6 


Chester Wilson Linblad 


76 


Aug. 


10 


Roy Spencer Smith 


62 


Aug. 


16 


Grace M. Loerch 


59 


Aug. 


19 


William Frank Rogers, Jr. 


70 


Aug. 


21 


Edward Barker Lingel 


70 


Aug. 


25 


Herbert Seymour Wight 


73 


Aug. 


27 


Albert A. Cruickshank, Jr. 


62 


Sept 


. 7 


Donald F. McClellan 


73 


Sept 


.12 


Josephine T. Martorana 


98 


Sept 


.18 


Wi I Li am M. Fairbanks 


41 


Sept 


.20 


Elizabeth Jane Sauer 


78 


Sept 


.22 


Archibald Wharmby Fri swell 


85 


Sept 


.28 


Walter M. Frank 


73 


Oct. 


1 


Cecilia A. Everett 


99 


Oct. 


19 


Frances Vi sent in 


99 


Oct. 


31 


Amy E. Wampole 


88 


Nov. 


7 


Wilma Lois Perrin 


81 


Nov. 


20 


Frederick A. Uvezian, Sr. 


89 


Nov. 


28 


Clara A. DeNucci 


76 


Dec. 


2 


Elizabeth Peksens 


79 


Dec. 


9 


Paul Anthony Montale 


67 


Dec. 


11 


Scott Joseph Eastman 


31 


Dec. 


13 


Kathryn W. Black 


94 


Dec. 


14 


Charles W. Munroe, Sr. 


77 


Dec. 


19 


Rena C. Pi card 


91 


Dec. 


27 


Donald Henry Phipps 


64 



Carcinoma of the Prostate 

Respiratory Failure 

Bronchial Pneumonia 

Cardiac Arrest 

Cerebral Vascular Accident 

Hyperkalemia 

Congestive Heart Failure 

Multiple Trauma 

Cardiac Arrest 

Tetralogy of Fallot 

Respiratory Failure 

Congestive Heart Failure 

Shock 

Cardiac Arrest 

Acute Cardiac-Respiratory Failure 

Cerebro Vascular Accident 

Blunt Trauma to head 

Septecemia 

Congestive Heart Failure 

Acute Myocardial Infarction 

Acute Cardiopulmonary Arrest 

Cardiac Arrest 

Cardiac Arrest 

Cardiorespiratory Arrest 

Respiratory Failure 

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning 

Respiratory Failure 

Calcific Aortic Stenosis 

Renal Carcinoma 

Cerebral Bleed 

Arrhythmia 

Ovarian Cancer 

Cardiac Arrest 

Cardiac Arrest 

Pulminary Embolism 

Acute Myocardial Infarction 

Acute Respiratory Failure 

Congestive Heart Failure 

Multiple Trauma 

Aspiration Pneumonitis 

Cardiac Arrest 

Bronchial Pneumonia 

Cardiac Arrhythmia 

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia 

Coronary Thrombosis 

Congestive Heart Failure 

Congestive Heart Failure 

Metastatic Carcinoma 

Adenocarcinoma Colon 

Pneumonia 

Pending Investigation 

Congestive Heart Failure 

Cancer of Prostate 

Cerebral Thrombosis 

Cardio Pulmonary Arrest 



149 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN MEDFIELD IN 1991 



DATE NAME 

Jan. 19 Nehman M. Ishac 

Wendy G. Catenacci 
Jan. 26 Mark Joseph Deschenes 

Cynthia L. Carreiro 
Feb. 23 Stephen Sean Meagher 

Janice Carol Knowles 
Mar. 16 Todd Matthew Carpenter 

Lorraine Helen Troup 
Apr. 13 Scott A. Donahue 

Jennifer Egan 
Apr. 16 David F. Jordan 

Kimberly M. Power 
May 4 Alan J. Melancon 

Donna E. Marshall 
May 4 Scott R. Lundstrom 

Karen M. LaFond 
May 4 Michael K. Dloewk 

Lisa A. Hulitzky 
May 11 Robert U. Lovell 

Christine San Soucie 
May 18 David W.B. Dawber 

Michelle L. Comeau 
May 27 Daniel Jay Salzberg 

Sophie M. Lanzkron 
May 30 Carlos F. Rerat 

Mary M. Rerat 
June 1 Brian James Dauphinee 

Laurie J. Beswick 
June 2 Robert E. Abramson 

Joan Marie Kiser 
June 8 Robert Hanson Redus 

Anita Joy Bauder 
June 8 William R. Gilooly 

Karen E. Rodgers 
June 8 William George Ringler 

Ellen Marie Connors 
June 15 Stephen Wilmarth Flynn 

Bonnie E. Patterson 
June 22 Mark William Haigh 

Ma re i a Jean Wood 
June 29 Joseph Leo Bibinski 

Janet M. Pagnotto 
June 29 Peter Dwight Gilpatric 

Suzanne M. Moschitto 
June 29 Jerome J. Hall 

Glenalea M. Laverie 
Aug. 10 Richard A. Codair 

Lisa M. D'Ambrosia 
Aug. 10 Barry Alan Greenberg 

Lisa M. Meinhart 
Aug. 24 Javier Set i en 

Marybeth Fottler 
Aug. 30 Brian M. Donovan 

Lisa M. Hinkley 
Aug. 30 Sean E. O'Neil 

Heather A. Bartlett 



RESIDENCE WHERE AND BY WHOM MARRIED 

Mi 1 1 is In Medfield 

Medfield David M. Flanders, Clergyman 

New York In Medfield 

Medfield Robert L. Wood, Clergyman 

Connecticut In Medfield 

Medfield Kevin J. Crowley, Priest 

Medfield In Dedham 

Medfield Thomas A. Duval, Clergyman 

Millis In Medfield 

Medfield Charles F. Egan, Priest 

Walpole In Medfield 

Medfield Kevin J. Crowley, Priest 

Dover In Medfield 

Dover Robert L. Wood, Clergyman 

Newton In Medfield 

Medfield Philip Des Rosiers, Priest 

New York In Holliston 

New York Jerome J. Janisro, Clergyman 

Medfield In Stoughton 

Franklin Anthony J. Medairos, Priest 

Medfield In Mendon 

Medfield Helen A. Gibson, J.O.P. 

New York In Boston 

Medfield David R. Blumenthal, Rabbi 

Medfield In Medfield 

Medfield Nancy J. Preston, J.O.P. 

Medfield In Medfield 

Medfield David M. Flanders, Clergyman 

Medfield In Needham 

Needham Harry Wheeler, J.O.P. 

Medfield In Wayland 

Attleboro Carlyle L. Saylor, M.O.G. 

Yarmouthport In Medfield 

Medfield Robert L. Wood, Clergyman 

N. Attleboro In Norwood 

N. Attleboro David G. Robinson, Priest 

Plainville In Medfield 

Medfield Ben L. Ingebretton, Clergy 

Medfield In Medfield 

Medfield Robert L. Wood, Clergy 

Tewksbury In Medfield 

Waltham Kevin J. Crowley, Priest 

Medfield In Belmont 

Medfield Mark F. Strickland, M.O.G. . 

Medfield In Westboro 

Medfield R. Scott Godfrane, J.O.P. 

N.H. In Medfield 

Woburn Michael M. Burke, Priest 

R.I. In Medfield 

R.I. Susan B. Green, J.O.P. 

Spain In Needham 

Medfield Lawrence Novel lo. Priest 

Medfield In Medfield 

Medfield Susan B. Green, J.O.P. 

Walpole In Norwood 

Medfield Janice S. Riolo, J.O.P. 



150 



Marriages 1991 Continued: 



Aug. 31 
Aug. 31 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 7 
Sept. 14 
Sept. 14 
Sept. 25 
Sept. 28 
Sept. 29 
Sept. 29 
Sept. 29 
Oct. 13 
Oct. 13 
Oct. 13 
Oct. 25 
Oct. 26 
Oct. 26 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 9 
Nov. 9 
Nov. 23 
Dec. 27 
Dec. 27 
Dec. 28 



Donald R. Gedarovich 

Patricia J. Pugliese 
Mark Dale Hoffmann 

Kimberlie A. Randlett 
Lawrence K. Howell 

Lee C. Knowles 
Timothy M. Wright 

Heidi Eager 
John F. Brady 

Nancy A. Grilli 
Todd MacLean Riddle 

Laura I A. Pans ire 
George S. Usevich 

Dianne M. Scaccia 
Timothy E. Dugan 

Mary K. Bruno 
James W. Lucarini 

Donna L. Casey 
Francis P. Marchand 

Paula G. O'Connell 
Douglas B. Lemay 

Sharon A. Bombelli 
John P. Kane 

Donna A. Dubanowitz 
Mark E. O'Connell 

Katherine M. Ahem 
Richard M. Sturchio 

Janice Carroll 
Lloyd Davis Avery 

Mary Vasaturo 
Gregory S. Sims 

Dawn M. DeLuca 
Matthew P. Uytas, Jr. 

Elizabeth E. Meagher 
Michael A. Riegelman 

Karen E. Schwartz 
William Edward Earle 

Rhonda Lee Ramsdell 
Dwight Edwood Everett 

Margaret Welsh Bode 
Neal James O'Connor 

Darrah Courtney March 
Gerard A. Coletta III 

Theresa Marie Ledwith 
Peter F. Kennedy 

Jennifer Rut I edge 
Mark Lawrence Ruston 

Dawn Marie Daniels 



Medfield In Medfield 

Medfield Kevin J. Crowley, Priest 

Texas In Medfield 

Texas Leila B. Holden, Clergy 

Franklin In Chatham 

Franklin Shelden Keller, M.O.G. 

DC In Scituate 

DC Ernest G. Jones, J.O.P 

Medfield In Medfield 

Walpole Kevin J. Crowley, Priest 

Medfield In Medfield 

Medfield Robert L. Wood, Clergyman 

Norwood In Boston 

Dedham James M. Connolly, J.O.P. 

Medfield In Mi 1 1 is 

Medfield Henry G. Chambers, Priest 

Medfield In Medfield 

Medfield Kevin J. Crowley, Priest 

Blackstone In Nantucket 

Blackstone William J. Freed, J.O.P. 

Virginia In Medfield 

Virginia Nancy J. Preston, J.O.P. 

Virginia In Medfield 

Medfield Kevin J. Crowley, Priest 

Medfield In Marlborough 

Medfield Bruce G. Flannagan, Priest 

Medfield In Dover 

Medfield Joseph P. Fratic, Priest 

Falmouth In Nantucket 

Medfield Madelyne G. Perry, J.O.P. 

Medfield In Medfield 

Medfield Kevin J. Crowley, Priest 

Connecticut In We lies ley 

Medfield John J. Philbin, Priest 

Connecticut In Medfield 

Connecticut Robert L. Wood, Clergyman 

Medfield In Melrose 

Medfield Steven M. Seminerio, Clergy 

Wrentham In Salem 

Wrentham Richard S. Winer, J.O.P. 

Medfield In Mi 1 1 is 

Medfield Deborah J. Pope-Lance, Clergy 

Quincy In Medfield 

Quincy Kevin J. Crowley, Priest 

Medfield In Natick 

Medfield James S. Woods, Priest 

New York In Worcester 

New York Terrance J. Walsh, Priest 



151 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
TOWN ELECTION 
MARCH 25, 1991 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. 
with the reading of the warrant, and the swearing in of the election 
workers present. The ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in 
working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was displayed and 
instructions to the voters posted. 

The following workers were assigned to their precincts. 

WARDEN: Elmer 0. Portmann, Jr. 



CLERKS: Precinct 1 

Precinct 2 

Precinct 3 

Precinct 4 



Mary MairEtienne, Mabel le Maguire, Clerk 
Beverly Hallowell 
Margaret O'Brien, Dorothy Sumner 
Katherine Buttoning 



BALLOT COUNTERS: Mary MairEtienne, Mabel le Maguire, Nancy Franke, 
Beverly Hallowell, Emmy Mitchell, Margaret O'Brien, Anna Murphy, Joan 
Bussow, William Hallowell, Katherine Buchanan, Phyllis Wilmarth, David 
Wilmarth, Dorothy Sumner, Sadie Carson, Anna Floser, Judy Cahill, 
Elton Bassett. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 1005. Absentee ballots 13. 

Total Registered Voters numbered 6250, 16% of the voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as 

follows: 



MODERATOR (one year) VOTE FOR ONE 
Ralph C. Copeland 
Blanks 

TOWN CLERK 

Nancy J. Preston 
Blanks 

SELECTMAN 

Harold F. Pritoni 

Blanks 

Scattered 



ASSESSOR 

William D. Walsh 
Blanks 







PRECINCT 




1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAI 


171 


209 


222 


186 


788 


44 


55 


70 


48 


217 


184 


231 


234 


193 


842 


31 


33 


58 


41 


163 


185 


230 


238 


199 


852 


30 


34 


53 

1 


35 


152 

1 


165 


207 


220 


187 


779 


50 


57 


72 


47 


226 



152 






SCHOOL COMMITTEE VOTE FOR ONE 












John K. McNiff 


67 


72 


84 


47 


270 


Paul Nyren, Jr. 


34 


74 


50 


65 


223 


Teresa A. Fannin 


109 


116 


154 


113 


492 


Blanks 


5 


2 


4 


8 


19 


Scattered 








1 


1 


PARK & RECREATION COMMISSION 












Gary J. Walsh 


164 


210 


216 


172 


762 


Blanks 


51 


54 


76 


62 


243 


LIBRARY TRUSTEES 












David B. Allen 


164 


215 


215 


188 


782 


Elizabeth Kozel 


157 


202 


214 


169 


742 


Blanks 


108 


111 


155 


111 


485 


Scattered 


1 








1 


PLANNING BOARD 












Mark G. Cerel 


163 


214 


224 


178 


779 


Blanks 


52 


50 


68 


56 


226 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 












Mary E. Thompson 


166 


216 


227 


183 


792 


Blanks 


49 


48 


65 


51 


213 



The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

After the results were announced, the ballots, checked voting lists and 
tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as 
prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 






153 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 1991 
MARCH 25. 1991 



Norfolk, ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, 
greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn 
the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections 
and in Town affairs, to meet at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, 
on Monday, the Twenty-fifth day of March, AD, 1991 at 6:00 o'clock 
A.M., then and there to act on the following articles: 

The polls will be open at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 
o'clock P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-ninth day of April, AD, 1991, commencing at 
7:30 o'clock P.M. the following articles will be acted on in the Amos 
Clark Kingsbury School gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the 
several Town Officers for the past year. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept the reports of the several Town 
Officers for the past year. 

(Consent Calendar 4/29/91) 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer/Collector 
to use all means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if 
elected to that office. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to authorize the Treasurer/Collector to 
use all means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if 
elected to that office. 

(Consent Calendar 4/29/91) 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named 
sum as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake 
Cemetery, the interest thereof as may be necessary for said care, viz: 

Edmund and Anne Rubino $ 600. 

Helen D. and Marion D. Dymek 1,200. 

Peter M. and Veronica B. Panciocco 600. 

Michael Medina, Jr. 600. 

Victor Foster 300. 

John McAdam 300. 

Mary Doloria 300. 

Clara A. & Alexander DeNucci 600. 

Barbara Quatromoni & Sylvia Olivieri 1,200. 

Andrew & Helen Foster 600. 

William T. Blair 100. 

(Catherine Schrade 300. 

Eugene F. Patrick & Helen G. Westphal 1,200. 

James & Doris Patterson 1,200. 

Doris Dunn 600. 



154 



Robert Bissell $ 300. 

Helen West 300. 

Ruth R. Vasaturo 300. 

Tracy & Emmy Mitchell 3,400. 

Vincent Hal I owe 1 1 800. 

Anthony Cloutman 1,200. 

William & Norma Rieger 200. 

William & Mary Brymer 600. 

Mary Ann Seaman 300. 

Gwendolyn H. Ski 1 1 in 1,800. 

Paul DeStefano 600. 

Ina M. Maggioni 300. 

Helen M. Fyfe 300. 

Veronica West 300. 

Geroge & Carol Naughton 1,200. 

TOTAL $21,600. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept the following named sums as 
Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake 
Cemetery, the interest thereof as may be necessary for said care. 

(Consent Calendar 4/29/91) 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to name the school currently 
known as the Junior High School or as Medfield Middle School located on 
the former Kingsbury property as the "Thomas A. Blake Middle School" in 
memory of the late Thomas A. Blake who served the Town as School 
Superintendent from 1957 to 1972, and to authorize appropriate 
dedication services. (4/29/91) 

VOTE: Voted to name the school currently known as the Junior High 
School or as Medfield Middle School located on the former 
Kingsbury property as the "Thomas A. Blake Middle School" in 
memory of the late Thomas A. Blake who served the Town as School 
Superintendent from 1957 to 1972, and to authorize appropriate 
dedication services. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept an equal education 
opportunity grant for fiscal year 1991 in the amount of $101,062., and 
an equal education opportunity grant for fiscal year 1992 in the amount 
of $101,062. under the provisions of General Laws Chapter 70A, Section 
5 as inserted by Chapter 188 of the Acts of 1985. Said grants shall be 
expended by the Tri -County Regional School District Committee for 
direct service expenditure. (Consent Calendar 4/29/91) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept an equal education opportunity 
grant for fiscal year 1991 and for fiscal 1992 in the amount of 
$101,062., under the provisions of General Laws Chapter 70A, 
Section 5 as inserted by Chapter 188 of the Acts of 1985. Said 
grants shall be expended by the Tri -County Regional School 
District Committee for direct service expenditure. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept the agreement 
establishing the Tri -County Technical and Vocational Regional School 
District (Tri -County) as amended and as it may be further amended to 
provide for the admission of the towns of Plainville and Wrentham. The 
amendment provides (a) that each town will have one member of the 
School Committee appointed by the Moderator, the Chairman of the Board 
of Selectmen and the Chairman of the School Committee of the town, 
acting jointly, for a three year term; (b) that for the first fiscal 
year of its membership the town will contribute as its entire share of 



155 



the operating costs and capital costs of Tri -County for such year an 
amount equal to what it would pay if the students from the town 
enrolled in Tri -County were tuition students, and the town will also be 
responsible for all the transportation costs of those students. After 
its first year of membership the town will pay its share of operating 
costs and capital costs apportioned in accordance with Section IV of 
the Agreement; and, (c) that the effective date for the admission of 
the town will be July 1st following its acceptance of the amended 
Tri -County agreement and the acceptance by each of the existing member 
towns of the amendment admitting the town. Copies of the Tri -County 
agreement as amended and of the proposed amendment, as described in 
this Article, are available for inspection at the office of the Town 
Clerk. (Consent Calendar 4/29/91) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept the agreement establishing the 
Tri -County Technical and Vocational Regional School District 
(Tri -County) as amended and as it may be further amended to 
provide for the admission of the towns of Plainville and Wrentham. 
The amendment provides (a) that each town will have one member 
of the School appointed by the Moderator, the Chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen and the Chairman of the School Committee of the 
town, acting jointly, for a three year term; (b) that for the 
first fiscal year of its membership the town will contribute as 
its entire share of the operating costs and capital costs of 
Tri -County for such year an amount equal to what it would pay if 
the students from the town enrolled in Tri -County were tuition 
students, and the town will also be responsible for all the 
transportation costs of those students. After its first year of 
membership the town will pay its share of operating costs and 
capital costs apportioned in accordance with Section IV of the 
Agreement; and (c) that the effective date for the admission of 
the town will be July 1st following its acceptance of the amended 
Tri -County agreement and the acceptance by each of the existing 
member towns of the amendment admitting the town. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the town will vote to name the intersection of 
Pine Street and North Street as Ocran Knehr Square in memory of the 
late Ocran Knehr who gave his life while servicing his country on 
November 2, 1941, and that a sign be made which includes a gold star 
and indicate this designation and authorize appropriate dedicatory 
services. (Committee to Study Memorials) (4/29/91) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to name the intersection of Pine Street 
and North Street as Ocran Knehr Square in memory of the late Ocran 
Knehr who gave his life while servicing his country on November 2, 
1941, and that a sign be made which includes a gold star, and 
indicate this designation and authorize appropriate dedicatory 
services. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the town will vote to name the intersection of 
South Street, Elm Street and Knollwood Road as Peter Panciocco Civic 
Square in memory of the late Peter Panciocco who contributed to the 
youth and well-being of the town and that a sign be made which includes 
the town seal and indicates this designation and authorize appropriate 
dedicatory services. (Committee to Study Memorials) (4/29/91) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to name the intersection of South Street, 
Elm Street and Knollwood Road as Peter Panciocco Civic Square in 
memory of the late Peter Panciocco who contributed to the youth 
and well-being of the town and that a sign be made which includes 



156 



the town seal and indicates this designation and authorize 
appropriate dedicatory services. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the town will vote to designate the road in the 
cemetery leading from Section C to Bridge Street along Sections I, A, 
and A as Roberts Avenue in memory of Joseph A. Roberts, Jr. who served 
as Cemetery Commissioner from 1945 to 1980 and as a member of the Board 
of Selectmen from 1954 to 1963. 

VOTE: Voted to designate the road in the cemetery leading from 

Section C toward Bridge Street along Sections I, J, and K as 
Roberts Avenue in memory of Joseph A. Roberts, Jr. 

(Committee to Study Memorials) 4/29/91 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the town will vote to amend Article 11, Section 
20. of the bylaws by striking the words Four Thousand ($4,000.) dollars 
where they appear in the section and substituting therefor "Ten 
Thousand" ($10,000.) dollars, so as to increase the amount of proposed 
contracts requiring public bidding to agree with the amount set out by 
state law. (Board of Selectmen) (4/29/91) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend Article 11, Section 20 of the 
bylaws by striking the words Four Thousand ($4,000.) dollars where 
they appear in the section and substituting therefor "Ten 
Thousand" ($10,000.) dollars, so as to increase the amount of 
proposed contracts requiring public bidding to agree with the 
amount set out by state law. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 11, Section 
21 of the bylaws by striking the words Four Thousand ($4,000.) dollars 
where they appear in the section and substituting therefor "Ten 
Thousand" ($10,000.) dollars, to increase the amount of contracts 
requiring bonds to agree with the state law requirements. 

(Board of Selectmen) 4/29/91 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend Article 11, Section 21 of the 
bylaws by striking the words Four Thousand ($4,000.) dollars where 
they appear in the section and substituting therefor "Ten 
Thousand" ($10,000.) dollars, to increase the amount of contracts 
requiring bonds to agree with the state law requirements. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article II of the 
Bylaws by adding a Section 26 as follows: 

"Town Boards, committees, officers and departments may enter 
into contracts in excess of three years for the purchase of 
goods and services." (Board of Selectmen) (4/30/91) 

VOTE: Voted to amend Article II by adding a Section 26 of the 
Bylaws as follows: 

"Town boards, committees, officers and departments, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen may enter into contracts 
in excess of three years for the purchase of goods and 
services." 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Chapter 245 of the Acts of 1988 which would permit the expenditure of 
the proceeds of a bond or deposit for the cost of completing the work 
for installation of utilities and construction of streets in an 



157 



approved subdivision, providing that the expenditure is approved by 
the Board of Selectmen. (Public Works Department) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted to accept the provisions of Chapter 245 of the Acts 
of 1988 which would permit the expenditure of the proceeds of a 
bond or deposit for the cost of completing the work for 
installation of utilities and construction of streets in an 
approved subdivision, providing that the expenditure is approved 
by the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Chapter 494 of the Acts of 1989 amending General Laws Chapter 59, 
Section 5, Clause 50, providing for property tax exemption for certain 
improvements made to residential property to provide for persons over 
sixty (60) years old. (Board of Assessors) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this Article. 
YES 171 
NO 249. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the town will vote to demand that its Senator 
and Representatives do everything necessary to implement the provisions 
of Question 5, which was approved overwhelmingly by the voters at the 
1990 biennial state election, including both the formulation of a plan 
to do so well as a vote in favor of an appropriation to fund local aid 
in the amount of 40% of growth taxes (income, corporate and sales) no 
later than July 1, 1993. (Board of Selectmen) 4/28/91 

VOTE: Voted to authorize and direct the Board of Selectmen to 
write to Senator Christopher J. Lane and Representative Lida E. 
Harkins demanding that they vote to take all action necessary to 
carry out the will of the voters as expressed in their affirmative 
vote on Question 5 at the 1990 biennial state election. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to delete ARTICLE VII DOG 
CONTROL, SECTION 5. LICENSE FEES from the bylaws and replace it with 
the following: 

"SECTION 5. LICENSE FEES 

License fees shall be as follows: 

Unspayed female $10. 

Spayed female and male 10. 
Kennels: 

Up to four dogs $ 25. 

Up to ten dogs 50. 

Over ten dogs 100. 

(Town Clerk) 4/29/91 

VOTE: Voted to delete ARTICLE VI I . DOG CONTROL, SECTION 5. 
LICENSE FEES from the bylaws and replace it with a new SECTION 5. 
LICENSE FEES as set out in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the town will vote to fix the salary and 
compensation of the following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, 
3electmen, Assessors, School Committee, Trustees of the \public 
Library, Park and Recreation Commission, Planning Board, and Housing 
Authority, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen)) 4/29/91 



158 



0. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


13,125. 


13,125. 


900. 


900. 


800. 


800. 


800. 


800. 


900. 


900. 


900. 


900. 


900. 


900. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


i on . 


0. 



Officer 

Moderator 

Housing Authority 

Town Clerk 

Selectmen, Chairman 

Selectmen, Clerk 

Selectman, 3rd Member 

Assessors, Chairman 

Assessors, Clerk 

Assessors, 3rd Member 

School Committee 

Library Trustees 

Planning Board 

Park & Recreation Commission 

VOTE: Voted to fix the salaries and compensation of the elected 
officers as set out in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 
Administration Plan, effective July 1, 1991, to read as follows: 

(Personnel Board) 4/29/91 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

SALARIED POSITIONS Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 

Police Department 

Police Sergeant 28,267 29,405 30,831 32,064 

Police Officer 22,194 23,751 25,578 27,277 28,368 

Specialist Range 350 2,000 

Police Officers designated as Detective, Photographer/Fingerprinter, , 
Prosecutor, Animal Control Officer or Assistant Animal Control Officer by 
the Police Chief shall receive additional compensation annually at a rate to 
be determined by the Police Chief within the above Specialist Range. In the 
absence of a police sergeant being on duty, the senior off icer-in-charge of 
any shift shall be paid an additional $4.00 per shift. 

G. Police Officers: For all regularly scheduled shifts starting after 3:00 
P.M. and finishing prior to 8:00 am, a night shift differential of $4.50 per 
shift will be paid, said sum to be paid annually during the month of June. 






TOWN MANAGERIAL POSITIONS 


Minimum 


Midpoint 


Maximum 


Streets. Water and Sewer 
Supt. of Public Works 


Department 

37,422 


46,494 


55,566 


Police Department 
Chief 


40,824 


49,896 


58,968 


Fire Department 
Chief 


35,721 


44,226 


52,731 


Executive Departments 
Town Administrator 
Administrative Assistant 
Treasurer/Col lector 


45,360 
27,216 
35,721 


56,700 
32,886 
44,226 


68,040 
38,556 
52,731 



159 



L ibrary 
D i rector 



27,216 



32,886 



38.556 



Other Salaried Position 



Board of Health 
Detached Social Worker 

Cemetery 

Cemetery Supervisor 

Executive Departments 
Town Accountant 

Hourly Positions 

Library 

Children's Librarian 

Reference Librarian 



21,912 




27,405 


25,200 


30,450 


35,700 


25,200 


30,450 


35,700 



8.78 
8.78 



10.95 
10.95 



12.00 
12.00 



HOURLY PAID POSITIONS 



Grade Minimum Wage 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
Grade 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



$3.75 



Minimum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


5.78 


6.06 


6.38 


6.71 


7.09 


6.06 


6.38 


6.71 


7.09 


7.43 


6.38 


6.71 


7.09 


7.43 


7.85 


6.71 


7.09 


7.43 


7.85 


8.25 


7.09 


7.43 


7.85 


8.25 


8.67 


7.43 


7.85 


8.25 


8.67 


9.14 


7.85 


8.25 


8.67 


9.14 


9.62 


8.25 


8.67 


9.14 


9.62 


10.12 


8.67 


9.14 


9.62 


10.12 


10.68 


Mini mum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


9.14 


9.62 


10.12 


10.68 


11.22 


9.62 


10.12 


10.68 


11.22 


11.85 


10.12 


10.68 


11.22 


11.85 


12.44 


10.68 


11.22 


11.85 


12.44 


13.10 


11.22 


11.85 


12.44 


13.10 


13.79 


11.85 


12.44 


13.10 


13.79 


14.52 


12.44 


13.10 


13.79 


14.52 


15.29 


13.10 


13.79 


14.52 


15.29 


16.05 


13.79 


14.52 


15.29 


16.05 


16.86 



GRADE 1 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 

GRADE 10 



Swimming Instructor 
Lifeguard Instructor 

$1,385. minimum per season 
Playground Counselor 
Lifeguard 

$1,153. minimum per season 

GRADE 2 
Intern/Trainee 



Presently no jobs 

GRADE 11 

Municipal Buildings Custodian 
Administrative Secretary 
Light Equipment Operator 
Senior Dispatcher 

GRADE 12 



160 



GRADE 3 

Laborer 

GRADE 4 

Clerk Typist 
Cemetery Foreman 
Minibus Driver, Council 

on Aging 
Library Assistant 

GRADE 5 

Executive Director, Council 

on Aging 
Ski lied Laborer 

GRADE 6 

Senior Library Assistant 
Secretary 

GRADE 7 

Col lector/Bookkeeper/Secretary 
Police Matron 
Skating Supervisor 
Traffic Supervisor 
GRADE 8 

Presently no jobs 

GRADE 9 



Wastewater Treatment 

Plant Operator 
Heavy Equipment Operator 
Water Technician 
Groundskeeper 

GRADE 13 

Equipment Operator Repairman 
Finance/Data Processing 
Supervisor 

GRADE 14 

Senior Groundskeeper 
Tree Warden/Insect Pest Control 
Senior Heavy Equipment Operator 
Senior Water Technician 
Senior Wastewater Treatment 
Operator 

GRADE 15 

Assistant Wastewater Treatment 
Plant Operator- in-Charge 

Sr. Equipment Operator 
Repairman 



GRADE 16 

Presently no jobs 
GRADE 17 



Senior Secretary 
Truck Driver 
Special Police Officer 
Permanent Intermittent 
Police Dispatcher 
Call Firefighters 



Street/Water/Sewer Foreman 
Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Operator- in-Charge 

GRADE 18 

Senior Wastewater Treatment 
Plant Operator- in-Charge 
Senior Foreman 



161 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 
PART TIME/TEMPORARY 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Assistant Waterfront Director 

Deputy Col lector 
Ambulance E.M.T. 

Fi re 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Youth Coordinator 

Police Intern 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Counsel 

Tree Climber 

Veteran's Agent 

Inspectors 

Inspector of Buildings 

Local Inspector of Buildings 

Gas Inspector 

Assistant Gas Inspector 

Plumbing Inspector 

Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Assistant Wiring Inspector 

Health Agent 

Street Inspector 

Zoning Enforcing Officer 



$1,128. per year 
3,216. to 4,197. per year 
200. to 275. per week 
1,730. minimum per season 
Fee 
13.13 per hour 



$1 ,710. per year 

587. per year 

435. per year 

435. per year 

$3,635. per year 

245. to 322. per week 

328. per year 

790. per year 
1,388. per year 
15,198. to 25,914. per year 
7.04 to 11.37 per hour 
4,080. per year 

$16.25 per inspection 
Annual Minimum $3,147. 
421. 
867. 
Annual Minimum 
Minimum 
Minimum 



Annual Minimum 
Annual Minimum 



158. 

2,569. 

589, 

1,430. 

421. 

16.25 per inspection 
8.54 per hour 
16.25 per inspection 



Annual 
Annual 

Annual Minimum 
Annual Minimum 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Personnel Board) 4/29/91 

VOTE: Voted that the Personnel Administration Plan, 
Classification of Positions and Pay Schedules be approved 
effective July 1, 1991 to read as set out in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to add the following position 
to the Personnel Administration Plan, Special Rate/Fee Positions, Part 
Time/Temporary, Fire Department as follows; 

Fire 

Fire Alarm Superintendent $435. /yr. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Personnel Board) 4/29/91 

VOTE: Voted that the Personnel Administration Plan, Special 
Rate/Fee Positions, Part Time/Temporary be amended by adding under 
Fire the following: 

Fire Alarm Superintendent $435. /yr. 



162 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 
Administration Plan, Section XI VACATIONS by striking the word 
"quarter" and inserting the words "three-quarters" in the 6th paragraph 
to provide that any unused vacation days shall be used in the first 
three-quarters of the next calendar year rather than the first quarter, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 4/29/91 

VOTE: Voted that the Personnel Administration Plan be amended 
effective July 1 , 1991 by striking the word "quarter" and 
inserting the words "three-quarters" in the 6th paragraph in 
Section XI VACATIONS. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen 
or any other Town Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray 
operating expenses of the Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 
1991, or such other sums as the Town may determine as required by 
General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 23. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate on the 
fiscal 1992 tax levy and/or transfer from available funds for Capital 
Expenditures including the following: (Capital Budget Committee) 

4//29/91 



DEPARTMENT 



ITEM 



Assessors 
Planning 
Park & Rec 



Reevaluation 
Cadd System 
Pfaff Center Roof 



Town Hall 



Pain Town Hall 

Update Town Hall Computer 



Highway 



Marlyn/Pheasant Road. Culvert 
Main Street resurfacing 
Resurfacing subdivisions 
Philip Street paving 
Design Highway Garage 
Bridge Repair 
Noon Hill Road. Culvert 
Calcium Chloride wetting 
Meeting House Pond 



DPW Equipment 



3 Yd. Loader 
Replace Mack Truck 
2 1/2 Yd. Loader 
3/4 Ton Pickup 
3/4 Ton Pickup Truck 
Ford 4x4 



Police 

Fire 

Cemetery 



Mainframe Computer Syster 
Cruiser Replacement 

Replace Fire Engine 
SCBA Fill & Purification 

Cemetery Drainage 



163 



School 



School Building 



Replace Cemetery Truck 
Cemetery resurfacing 

Computer hardware update 
Middle School Gym Bleachers 
Wheelock chairlift 
Conversion H.S. Heat system 
Retrofit Dale St. Boi ler 
High School Field Project 
Recover Gymnasium floor 
Dale St. cafeteria 
Kabota Lawn tractor 
Reline paving facilities 
Refinish Gym floor 

School renovation design 



and that The Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee be further 
authorized to contract with and otherwise treat with any federal and 
state agencies for reimbursement of the cost of any capital 
expenditures; and that the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee 
respectively be authorized to trade or sell toward part of the purchase 
price, the following: 

Trade or sell: 



Department 
Po I i ce 

Public Works 



Trade In or Sell 

1980 Chevrolet dog van 
1980 Ford sedan 

1988 Ford sedan 

1989 Chevrolet sedan 
Caterpillar 816B compactor 
Clark 75c loader 

Clark 55c loader 
1970 mist blower 



Fire Department 



1961 International Pumper 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Capital Budget Committee) 4/29/91 



Department Item 



Planning 



Cost 



Recommend. Other 

Cap Bdg Comm Tax Levy F i nanc i ng 



Geographic Maps $20,000 

System 

Park & Rec Pfaff Ctr. Roof 28,600. 

Repair 

Town Hall Paint Town Hall 8,000. 

Highway Marlyn/Pheas. 350,000. 

Road. Drain 

Main St. Resur. 150,000. 

Resurf. Subdiv. 35,000. 

Philip St. Pav. 26,664. 
Desgn. Hgwy. Gar. 15,000. 

Philip/Causeway 12,000. 

Bridge 

Noon Hill Road. 12,000, 

Culvert 



0. 






$28,600. 


$16,100. 


$12,500. 


0. 






350,000. 


87,500. 


262,500. 


150,000. 


0. 


150,000. 


0. 






0. 






0. 






6,000. 


6,000. 





12,000, 



12,000, 



164 






97,000. 
67,000. 


14,000. 
57,000. 


83,000. 
10,000. 


0. 
0. 
0. 
0. 
48,000. 
0. 


48,000. 




48,500. 


48,500. 




0. 






5,000. 


5,000. 




26,000. 
0. 


0. 


26,000. 



Calcium Chloride 10,000. 

Wetting 
Clean Meeting 10,000. 

House PD 
DPW Equip. 3 Cubic Yd. Ldr. 97,000. 
2 1/2 Cubic Yd. 76,000. 

Loader 
Replace Mack Trk. 82,222. 
3/4 Ton Pickup 21,153. 
3/4 Ton Pickup 20,100. 
4x4 Truck 18,500. 
Police Cruiser Replac. 48,000. 
Mainframe Compu. 50,000. 

System 
Fire Replace Fire 200,000. 

Engine 
SCBA Fill & 19,000. 

Purify 
Cemetery Replace Riding 5,000. 

Mower 
Cemetery Expan. 38,000. 
Replace Cemetery 20,000. 

Truck 
School Computer Hdw. 51,173. 0. 

Mid. Sch. Gym 30,000 

Bleachers 
Wheelock Chair 30,000. 30,000. 30,000. 

Lift 

Convert H.S. Heat 28,900, 

System 
Retrofit Dale 

Boiler 
H.S Field Const. 
Recover Mem. S. 

Gym Fir. 
Dale Cafeteria 

Ceiling 
Replace Lawn 
Re line Pavemt. 

Marking 
Refinish H.S. Gym 7,500. 

Floor 
School Bldg. H.S. Renovation 
Committee 

TOTALS: $1,628,512. $944,000. $400,000. $544,000 



(Capital Budget Committee) 4/29/91 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate the following sums for capital 
expenditures: 

Recommend 

Park & Rec. Pfaff Ctre Roof Repair $28,600. 

Highway Marlyn/Pheas. Drainage 350,000. 

Main St. Resurfacing 150,000. 

Philip/Causeway Bridge 6,000. 

Noon Hill Road. Culvert 12,000. 



28,900. 


28,900. 


28,900. 


0. 


26,700. 


0. 






20,000. 
12,000. 


10,000. 
12,000. 


10,000. 
12,000. 


0. 
0. 


9,000. 


0. 






8,000. 
8,000. 


0. 
0. 






7,500. 


0. 






25.000. 


25.000. 


25.000. 


0. 



165 



DPW Equip. 3 Cubic Yd. Loader 97,000. 

2 1/2 Cubic Yd. Loader 67,000. 

Police Cruiser Replacement 48,000. 

Fire Replace Fire Engine 48,500. 

Cemetery 

School 



Replace Cemetery Mower 


5,000. 


Cemetery Expansion 


26,000. 


Wheelock Chairlift 


30,000. 


High School Heat System 


28,900. 


High School Field Const r. 


10,000. 


Recover Memorial Gym Floor 


12,000. 


H.S. Renovation Study 


25.000. 




$944,000. 



and that the Board of Selectmen and/or School Committee be 
authorized to contact with and otherwise treat with any federal 
and state agencies for reimbursement of the cost of any capital 
expenditures; and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to 
trade or sell toward part of the purchase price; 



Department Trade-in or Sell 

Police 1980 Chevrolet Dog Van 

1980 Ford Sedan 

1988 Ford Sedan 

1989 Chevrolet Sedan 

Public Works Caterpillar 816B 

Compactor 
Clark 75 Cubic Loader 
Clark 55 Cubic Loader 
1970 Mist Blower 

Fire Department 1961 International 

Pumper 

and that to meet this appropriation, $400,000. be raised on the 
1992 tax levy and the following sums transferred. 

To be funded by $400,000 Tax Levy 

412,500 State Highway Funds 

26,000 Sale of Lots Fund 

12,500 Park & Rec Revolving Fund 

93.000 Trade- Ins or Sale 
$944,000 



ARTICLE 24. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate on the fiscal 1992 tax levy to be used in conjunction with 
and in addition to any funds allotted by the Commonwealth for the 
construction, reconstruction and improvement of roads under the 
provisions of Section 34, Chapter 90 of the General Laws, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Superintendent of Public Works) 4/30/91 



166 



VOTE: Voted that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to enter 
into contracts with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department 
of Public Works and to expend funds allotted by the Commonwealth 
for the construction, reconstruction and improvement of roads 
under the provisions of Section 34 of Chapter 90 of the General 
Laws. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the 
following named streets, or parts thereof: 

Turner Hill Road from Station 0+00 to 9+59.65 
Sanders Way from Station 0+20 to 6+07.67 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to 
in the several Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office 
and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or 
otherwise, such rights, titles and easements, including drainage 
easements, as may be necessary to accomplish such purposes, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept as public ways the following 
named streets: 

Turner Hill Road from Station 0+00 to 9+59.65 
Sanders Way from Station 0+20 to 6+07.67 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans 
referred to in the several Orders of Layout on file with the Town 
Clerk's office and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles and easements, 
including drainage easements, as may be necessary to accomplish 
such purposes. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Section 57C, Chapter 59 of the General Laws authorizing the town to 
issue quarterly real estate and personal property tax bills, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted to accept the provisions of Section 57C, Chapter 59 
of the General Laws authorizing the Town to issue quarterly real 
estate and personal property tax bills. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for the purpose of conducting a Hazardous Household Waste 
Collection Day, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 4/29/91 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $2,000 be appropriated for the 
purpose of conducting a Hazardous Household Waste Collection, and 
that the appropriation be raised on the tax levy. 



167 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to authorize acceptance of 
that parcel of land shown as lots 22 and N-5 on a plan of land entitled 
"Subdivision Plan of Castle Hill Estates No. 11 in Medfield, 
Massachusetts, being a subdivision of Lot 16 shown on Land Court Plan 
3159G and a subdivision of unregistered land, scale 1 inch equals 40 
feet", drawn by Cheney Engineering Co., Inc. dated August 28, 1986 
donated by Michael Marholin and Howard H Grayson as they are Trustees 
of Medfield Realty Trust, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted to accept the gift of a parcel of land shown as Lots 
22 and N-5 on a plan of land entitled "Subdivision Plan of Castle 
Hill Estates No. II in Medfield, Massachusetts, being a 
subdivision of Lot 16 as shown on Land Court Plan 3159G and a 
subdivision of unregistered land, scale 1 inch equals 40 feet", 
drawn by Cheney Engineering Co., Inc. dated August 28, 1986, 
donated by Michael Marholin and Howard H. Grayson as they are 
Trustees of Medfield Realty Trust. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Chapter 291 of the Acts of the Acts of 1990, thereby allowing the Town 
to receive enhanced 911 service as defined in said Act and, if 
acceptance and notification to the Secretary of the Commonwealth of 
said acceptance occur on or before December 11, 1991, the Town will 
also receive, at no cost to it, the benefits of enhanced 911 network 
features and network components, including at least one public safety 
answering point, and any other enhanced 911 network features that may 
be made available by the statewide emergency telecommunications board, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Police Department) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted to accept the provisions of Chapter 291 of the Acts 
1990, and that the Town Clerk send notification of said acceptance 
to the Secretary of the Commonwealth on or before December 11, 
1991. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following bylaw: 

SECTION 1. DEFINITIONS: 

When used in this Bylaw, unless a contrary intention clearly appears, 

the following words shall have the following meanings: 

(a) "Central station operating company": A company equipped to 
receive a fire alarm signal from each of its customers and which 
then transmits to the Medfield Fire Department (MFD) the location 
of any such alarm the central station operating company receives. 

(b) "Fire Alarm System": Any heat activated, smoke-activated, 
flame-energy -activated or other such automatic device capable of 
transmitting a fire alarm signal to either a central station 
operating company or directly to the MFD by way of a master box. 

(c) "Fire alarm system malfunction": The transmittal of a fire 
alarm to a central station operating company or directly to the 
MFD by way of a master box which alarm is caused by improper 
installation of a fire alarm system, a mechanically defective fire 
alarm system, lack of maintenance or some other reasons that 
causes a fire alarm to sound even though there is no actual fire 
or situation that reasonably could evolve into a fire. 



168 



(d) "Fire alarm system owner": An individual or entity who owns 
the title to and/or has on his business or residential premises a 
fire alarm system equipped to send a fire alarm signal to a 
central station operating company or directly to the MFD by way of 
a master box. 

(e) "Fire Chief": The Chief of the Medfield Fire Department. 

(f) "Master box owner": An individual or entity who has on his 
business or residential premises a fire alarm system equipped to 
send a fire alarm signal directly to the MFD by way of a master 
box, which is a municipal fire alarm box. 



SECTION 2. CONNECTION OF FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS TO THE MEDFIELD FIRE 
DEPARTMENT BY WAY OF A MASTER BOX. 

A. Before any fire alarm system is connected to the MFD, the master 
box owner shall provide the Fire Chief with the following 
information: 

(a) the name, address, and home and work telephone numbers of the 
master box owner; 

(b) the street address where the master box is located; 

(c) the names, addresses and telephone numbers of the persons or 
businesses protected by the fire alarm system connected to the 
master box; 

(d) the names, addresses and home and work telephone numbers of at 
least two persons other than the owner who can be contacted 
twenty-four hours a day, who are authorized by the master box 
owner to respond to an alarm signal and who have access to the 
premises in which the master box is located; and 

(e) such other information as the Fire Chief may require. 

If, at the passage of the Bylaw, a fire alarm system has already been 
connected to the MFD by way of a master box, the master box owner shall 
comply with the requirements of this section within sixty (60) days 
after the MFD has sent him notice by first class mail of the 
requirements of this section. 

If a master box owner fails to comply with this section, the Fire Chief 
may assess a fine of fifty dollars ($50.00) for each day of 
noncompliance. 

SECTION 3. CONNECTION OF CENTRAL STATION OPERATING COMPANIES TO THE 
MEDFIELD FIRE DEPARTMENT 

A. Every central station operating company which has a direct 
connection on the effective date of this Bylaw to the MFD, shall pay 
the following fees: 

Annual Fee $200.00 



169 



B. Before any central station operating company is connected with the 
MFD, it shall provide the Fire Chief with the following information: 

(a) the name, addresses, and home and work telephone numbers of 
the central station operating company; 

(b) the names, addresses, and home and work telephone numbers of 
at least two persons who can be contacted twenty-four hours a day, 
who are authorized by the central station operating company to 
respond to an alarm signal and who have access to the premises 
from where the alarm signal is emitting to the central station 
operating company; 



(c) the names, address, home and work telephone numbers, and 
location of the premises of each customer of the central station 
operating company who has a fire alarm system equipped to send a 
fire alarm signal to the central station operating company; and 

(d) such other information as the Fire Chief may require. 

If, at the passage of this Bylaw, a central station operating company 
already has a direct connection to the MFD, the central station 
operating company shall comply with the requirements of this section 
within sixty (60) days after the MFD has sent its notice by first class 
mail of the requirements of this section. 

If a central station operating company fails to comply with this 
section, the Fire Chief may assess a fine of fifty dollars ($50) for 
each day of noncompliance. 

SECTION 4. UPDATING INFORMATION: 

Every master box owner and every central station operating company 
shall be responsible for updating the information herein required to be 
provided to the Chief. If the information provided changes, the master 
box owner and the central station operating company shall provide the 
Fire Chief with the updated information and shall pay the fee, if any, 
required by this Bylaw. 

If a master box owner or a central station operating company fails to 
comply with this section, the Fire Chief may assess a fine of fifty 
dollars ($50). 

SECTION 5. FIRE ALARM SYSTEM MALFUNCTIONS - FINES: 

If there is a fire alarm system malfunction, as defined herein, the 
Fire Chief may assess a fine against a fire alarm system owner for each 
malfunction per fiscal year according to the following schedule: 

A. FIRST THROUGH THIRD MALFUNCTION: No charge. 

Upon the recording of the third false alarm by the Fire 
Department, the Fire Chief shall notify the owner of the building, 
in writing and by certified mail, of such fact, and at that time 
inform the owner of the Department's Policy with regards to 
charging for false alarms. (Send copy of the policy at this 
t i me ) . 

FOURTH THROUGH SIXTH MALFUNCTION: $100.00 



170 






SEVENTH THROUGH ELEVENTH MALFUNCTION: $200.00 

EACH MALFUNCTION AFTER THE ELEVENTH: $300.00 

B. Private fire alarm systems connected to the Medfield Fire 
Department by other automatic means or through a central station 
system shall be subject to the above conditions. 



C. Any false fire alarm which is the result of the failure of the 
property owner, occupant or their agents to notify the Medfield 
Fire Department of repair, maintenance or testing of the internal 
fire alarm system within the protected premises, shall cause a 
penalty to be assessed in accordance with Section (A). 

D. For the purposes of this regulation, a false fire alarm shall be 
defined as follows: 

1. The operation of a faulty smoke or heat detection device. 

2. Faulty control panel or associated equipment. 

3. A water pressure surge in automatic sprinkler equipment. 

4. Accidental operation of an automatic sprinkler system. 

5. An action by an employee of the owner or occupant of the 
protected premises or a contractor employed by the owner or 
the occupant, causing accidental activation of the internal 
fire alarm system. 

E. Property owners will be billed once a month for the previous 
month's malfunction activity. All fines assessed shall be paid to 
the Town Treasurer for deposit in the general fund. 

F. If the bill is not paid within 30 days, a second notice will be 
sent: if the bill is not paid after another 30 day period, a 
final notice will be sent informing the owner and/or occupant that 
the master box will be disconnected and the insurance company 
notified. 

SECTION 6: RESTRICTIONS ON TAPE DIALERS AND SIMILAR AUTOMATIC 
TELEPHONE DEVICES: 

No fire alarm system shall be equipped with a tape dialer or similar 
automatic telephone device which will transmit an alarm message to any 
telephone lines of the MFD. If, at the passage of the Bylaw, a fire 
alarm system is equipped with such a tape dialer or similar automatic 
telephone device, the fire alarm system owner shall have sixty (60) 
days, following the approval of this bylaw by the Attorney General, to 
disconnect such tape dialer or similar automatic telephone device. If 
a fire alarm system owner fails to comply with this section, the Fire 
Chief may assess a fine of fifty dollars ($50.00). 

SECTION 7: APPEAL PROCEDURE: 

Any fire alarm system owner who is aggrieved by an action taken by the 
Fire Chief under this Bylaw may, within ten (10) days of such action, 
file an appeal, in writing, with the Board of Selectmen of the Town of 



171 



Medfield (the Board). After notice the Board shall hold a hearing, 
after which it shall issue a decision in which it affirms, annuls or 
modifies the action taken by the Fire Chief giving its reasons 
therefor. The Board shall send its decision to the owner by first 
class mail within ten (10) days after the hearing. The decision of the 
Board shall be a final administrative decision. The owner shall have 
thirty (30) days from the date of the written decision to seek judicial 
review in the Norfolk County Superior Court. 

SECTION 8: REGULATIONS AND ENFORCEMENT: 

The Fire Chief may promulgate such regulations as may be necessary to 
implement this Bylaw. The Fire Chief is authorized to pursue such 
legal action as may be necessary to enforce this Bylaw. 

SECTION 9. DEPOSIT IN THE GENERAL FUND: 

All fines assessed herein shall be payable to the Town of Medfield for 
deposit in the General Fund. 

SECTION 10. SEVERABILITY: 

The provisions of this Bylaw shall be deemed to be severable, and if 
any of its provisions shall be held unconstitutional by any court of 
competent jurisdiction, the decision of such court shall not affect or 
impair any of the remaining provisions. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Bylaws by adding ARTICLE XV 
FIRE ALARMS SYSTEMS as set out in the warrant 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to approve the mandatory 
separation and recycling rules and regulations prepared by the 
Recycling Committee pursuant to the vote of the Town on Article 38 of 
the 1990 Annual Town Meeting and to authorize and direct the Selectmen 
to add the recycling rules and regulations to the TRANSFER STATION 
REGULATIONS. The recycling rules and regulations are available for 
review in the Town Clerk's Office, the Memorial Public Library and in 
the Warrant Report; or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Recycling Committee) 4/30/91 

The following are the proposed amendments to the Transfer Station 
Regulations: 

Section A AREA AND JURISDICTION shall be amended by adding: 

8. Areas shall be maintained to receive recyclables including 
(when markets are available) but not limited to: old 
newsprint, aluminum, glass, metal cans, plastics, returnable 
plastic and aluminum beverage containers, used clothing, 
white goods, yard waste and used motor oil. 

Section D. SPECIFICATIONS FOR DISPOSAL OF CERTAIN ITEMS shall be 
amended by adding: 



172 



4. Recyclables shall be separated and disposed of in the 
following manner: 

a. Old newsprint (ONP): shall be either packed in standard 
grocery bags, or securely tied in flat bundles. 

b. Aluminum: cans other than returnable beverage 
containers, made from aluminum, aluminum foil, aluminum 
wrappers, and containers or trays used in packaging, 
preparation or cooking of prepared meals, pies, cakes or 
other foods shall be cleaned of food particles and placed in 
the provided container. 

c. Glass: all jars and bottles, or similar products made 
from silica or sand, ash, soda and limestone, the product 
being used for packaging or bottling of various matter and 
all other material commonly known as glass, excluding: 

1. blue and flat glass known as window glass, 

2. dishes and crockery, 

3. mirrors 

4. heat resistant glass (i.e. pyrex), and 

5. light bulbs and tubes 

shall be washed and metal and plastic caps, neck rings, metal 
labels and corks removed; separated by color (green, clear 
and brown); and disposed of in the provided containers. 

d. Ferrous metal cans: all containers, composed in whole of 
iron or steel and so called "tin" cans used for packaging or 
storing of various food and nonfood items, EXCEPT containers 
which contained paint or petroleum based products and any 
pressurized can shall be deposited in the provided container. 

e. Returnable plastic and aluminum beverage containers: all 
returnable plastic and aluminum beverage containers< for 
which a deposit has been paid upon purchase shall be rinsed, 
and separated into plastic and aluminum and deposited in the 
containers provided. For such returnable items the Board of 
Selectman shall decide the use of the revenues from the 
return of such containers, some portion of which will always 
be reserved for the household hazardous waste day collection 
costs. 

f. Used clothing: any used article of clothing shall be 
deposited in the containers provided by charitable 
organizations. 

g. White goods: all household metal appliances that are 
bulky in size (i.e. stoves, washers, dryers, residential 
freezers, refrigerators, dishwashers, hot water heaters, 
etc.) shall be deposited in the designated white goods pile. 

h. Yard Waste: all yard waste, leaves, grass, and garden 
clippings shall be deposited in the designated areas and 
shall be composted by the Town of Medfield. 

i. Waste oil: used crankcase motor oil, containing no 
contaminants other than those associated with normal use in a 
motor vehicle engine, shall be deposited in the waste oil 
container provided by the Town of Medfield. 



173 



Recyclable materials shall not be limited to those items listed above. 
Other recyclable materials shall be separated and collected in the 
recycling area of the Transfer Station as markets become available. 
Disposal of such materials shall be done as directed by signs posted at 
the collection containers. 

Section F. ITEMS WHOSE DISPOSAL IS PERMITTED OR PROHIBITED shall be 
amended by adding a new section 4 and by renumbering sections 5 and 6: 

4. Recyclable materials defined under Section D 4 shall not be 
disposed of on the Transfer Station floor, but must be recycled as 
designated in Section D 4. 

VOTE: Voted that the Rules and Regulations for mandatory 
recycling as voted pursuant to Article 38 of the 1990 Annual Town 
Meeting will be elective until July 1, 1992 at which time they 
will become mandatory. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of 
$19,819. to be added to previously appropriated funds appropriated to 
the Capital Account for installation of a chair lift in the Middle 
School and that to meet this appropriation, the following sums be 
transferred: 

$ 750. from Article 18 of the 1987 Annual Town Meeting 

3,010. from Article 17 of the 1988 Annual Town Meeting 

3,320. from Article 15 of the 1989 Annual Town Meeting 

12,739. from Article 17 of the 1990 Annual Town Meeting 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Department) 4/29/91 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate the sum of $19,819. to be added to 
funds appropriated to the Capital Budget Account at the 1990 Town 
Meeting for installation of a chair lift in the Middle School and 
that to meet this appropriation the following sums be transferred: 

$ 750. from Article 18 of the 1987 Annual Town Meeting 

3,010. from Article 17 of the 1988 Annual Town Meeting 

3,320. from Article 15 of the 1989 Annual Town Meeting 

12,739. from Article 17 of the 1990 Annual Town Meeting 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to pay a bill from a previous 
fiscal year owed to Medfield Electric in the amount of $5,808. and that 
to meet this appropriation, the sum of $5,766. remaining in the 
appropriation of Article 17 of the 1990 Annual Town Meeting and $42. 
appropriated by Article 15 of the 1989 Annual Town Meeting be 
transferred for this purpose, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. (School Department) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to pay a bill from a previous fiscal year 
owed to Medfield Electric in the amount of $5,000. and that to 
meet this appropriation, the sum of $5,766. remaining in the 
appropriation of Article 17 of the 1990 Annual Town Meeting and 
$42. appropriated by Article 15 of the 1989 Annual Town Meeting to 
be transferred for this purpose. 



174 



ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to change the name of the 
Master Plan Implementation Committee to the Long Range Land Planning 
Committee, and to add to its charter the responsibility to prepare, or 
to recommend the preparation of, comprehensive land use planning 
materials to assist elected or appointed boards and committees in 
developing and implementing plans for long range land use. The Long 
Range Land Planning Committee will be comprised of from three to nine 
members from Town residents at large appointed by the Planning Board, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted to amend the motion by eliminating the word "Land" in 
the name of the Committee and changing the words "land use" to 
"community planning" so that the sentence reads as follows: 

"Change the name of the Master Plan Implementation Committee to 
the Long Range Planning Committee, and to add to its charter the 
responsibility to prepare, or to recommend the preparation of, 
comprehensive community planning materials to assist elected or 
appointed boards and committees in developing and implementing 
plans for long range community planning and land use." 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 5.3.3. of 
the zoning bylaw by deleting the present language and by substituting 
therefor the following: 

"No parking for an Industrial-Extensive (IE), Business- Industrial (BI), 

or Business (b) District and no vehicular access to an 

Industrial -Extensive, Business- Industrial or Business District shall be 

on land that is zoned Residential. Vehicular access to an 

Industrial-Extensive, Business- Industrial or Business District shall be 
over a public way," or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend Section 5.3.3. of the Zoning 
Bylaw by deleting the present language and by substituting the 
following: 

"No parking for an Industrial -Extensive (IE), Business- Industrial 
(B-I), or Business (B) District and no vehicular access to an 
Industrial-Extensive, Business- Industrial or Business District 
shall be on land that is zoned Residential. Vehicular access to 
an Industrial -Extensive, Business- Industrial or Business District 
shall be over a public way,." 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw by 
deleting Section 11.2.1. as it now reads and by substituting the 
following: 

"The Watershed Protection District is superimposed over any other 
District established by this Bylaw. The Watershed Protection District 
is defined as all land area along the streams and brooks for a 
horizontal distance of at least 25 feet from the normal high water line 
and from adjacent low, marshy areas. The names of the brooks included 
within the District are as follows: Great Pond Brook, Mill Brook, 
North Brook, Saw Mill Brook, Sewall Brook, Nantasket Brook, Turtle 
Brook, Vine Brook, Winter Brook, Brooks "A" through "J" inclusive, and 
all other brooks in the Town of Medfield." or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 4/30/91 



175 



VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Zoning Bylaw be amended by 
deleting Section 11.2.1 as it now reads and by substituting the 
fol lowing: 

"The Watershed Protection District is superimposed over any other 
District established by this Bylaw. The Watershed Protection 
District is defined as all land area along the streams and brooks 
for a horizontal distance of at least 25 feet from the normal high 
water line and from adjacent low, marshy areas. The names of the 
brooks included within the District are as follows: Great Pond 
Brook, Mill Brook, North Brook, Saw Mill Brook, Sewall Brook, 
Nantasket Brook, Turtle Brook, Vine Brook, Winter Brook, Brooks 
"A" through "J" inclusive, and all other brooks in the Town of 
Medfield." 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 11.2.2. of 
the zoning bylaw by deleting the language "that are shown on the zoning 
map of the Town of Medfield" and by substituting therefor "that are in 
the Town of Medfield", or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend Section 11.2.2. of the Zoning 
Bylaw by deleting the language "that are shown on the zoning map 
of the Town of Medfield" and by substituting therefor "that are in 
the Town of Medfield." 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw 
Section 13.1.3 by deleting the first paragraph as it now reads and by 
substituting therefor the following: 

"A Sign Advisory Board shall be appointed by the Planning Board and 
shall be composed of three residents at large and two business 
persons." 

(Planning Board) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw Section 13.1.3 
by deleting the first paragraph as it now reads and by 
substituting the following language: 

"A Sign Advisory Board shall be appointed by the Planning Board 
and shall be composed of three residents at large and two business 
persons." 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw by 
adding under DEFINITIONS a Section 2. 1.16. A Family Apartment as 
follows: 

"A dwelling unit within a single structure for use by a Family member." 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 4/29/91 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw by adding 
under DEFINITIONS a Section 2.1.16A Family Apartment the 
fol lowing: 

"A dwelling unit within a single structure for use by a Family 

member." 



176 



ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw by 
deleting Section 6.2.11 as it presently appears and by substituting the 
following: 

"In any 'R' District permitted accessory buildings shall conform to the 
following provisions: They shall not occupy more than 40 percent of 
the required rear yard; they shall not be less than 60 feet from any 
street lot line, except for a garage on a corner lot, which shall be 
set back at least the same distance as the front yard setback for the 
adjacent lot; and they shall not be less than six feet from any lot 
line other than a street lot line." or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Planning Board) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw be deleting 
Section 6.2.11 as it presently appears and by substituting the 
following: 

"In any 'R' District permitted accessory buildings shall conform 
to the following provisions: They shall not occupy more than 40 
percent of the required rear yard; they shall not be less than 60 
feet from any street lot line, except for a garage on a corner 
lot, which shall be set back at least the same distance as the 
front yard setback for the adjacent lot; and they shall not be 
less than six feet from any lot line other than a street lot 
line." 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw 
Section 6.3 TABLE OF HEIGHT AND BULK REGULATIONS for District I-E by 
deleting the parenthetical reference to the Massachusetts State 
Building Code and Chapter 30A of the Massachusetts General Laws, Table 
2.6 and by substituting therefor "35" in the Maximum Height column and 
"2" in the Permitted Height (Stories) column, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Zoning Bylaw Section 6.3 TABLE OF HEIGHT 
AND BULK REGULATIONS for District I-E by deleting the 
parenthetical reference to the Massachusetts State Building Code 
and Chapter 30A of the Massachusetts General Laws, Table 2.6 and 
by substituting therefor "35" in the Maximum Height column and "2" 
in the Permitted Height (Stories) column. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw by 
deleting Section 6.2.19 as it presently reads and by substituting the 
following: 

"Any permitted structure within a Business District shall have a 
minimum seven-foot setback. The area between the building and the 
sidewalk shall be landscaped. The landscaped setback may be 
interrupted only by access walks and driveways." or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted that the Zoning Bylaw be amended by deleting Section 
6.2.19 as it presently reads and by substituting the following: 



177 



"Any permitted structure within a Business District shall have a 
minimum seven-foot setback. The area between the building and the 
sidewalk shall be landscaped. The landscaped setback may be 
interrupted only by access walks and driveways." 

YES 223 NO 109 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw 
Section 6.2 Table of Area Regulations for zoning district B "Any 
permitted residential use (one and two-family)", by changing the Yards 
column to read under Front "7***" and under Side to read "***" and by 
adding below the Table "*** See 6.2.19" and "***" See 6.2.17", or do 
or act in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw Section 
6. 2. Table of Area Regulations for Zoning District B "Any other 
permitted business use" and "Any permitted residential use (one 
and two-fami ly)" f by changing the Yards column to read under Front 
"7***" and under Side to read "***" and by adding below the Table 
"*** See 6.2.19" and "*** See 6.2.17." 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw 
TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS by adding the following Section 5.4.5.10: 

"Recycling Facility A R-E R-T R-S R-U B BI IE 

No No No No No SP SP SP" or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw TABLE OF USE 
REGULATIONS by adding the following Section 5.4.5.10: 

"Recycling Facility A R-E R-T R-S R-U B BI IE 
No No No No No SP SP SP" 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw by 
amending Section 14.10.5 a) by deleting in line 1 the following: 

"In R-E, R-T, R-S and R-U Districts," or do or act in relation 
thereto. 

(Planning Board) 4/29/91 

VOTE: Voted Unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw by amending 
Section 14.10.5 a) by deleting in Line 1 the following: 

"In R-E, R-T, R-S and R-U Districts," 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw 
SECTION 2. Definitions by adding the following: 

"2. 1.6. A Buffers 

"A landscaped strip to provide a visual barrier" or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 4/30/91 



178 






VOTE: Voted Unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw SECTION 2. 
Definitions be adding the following: 

"2. 1.6. A Buffers 

"a landscaped strip to provide a visual barrier." 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw 
SECTION 3. ESTABLISHMENT OF ZONING DISTRICTS by adding to paragraph 3.1 
the following: 

" and three overlay districts as follows: 
Watershed Protection District WP 

Flood Plain District FP 

Aquifer Protection District AQ" 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw SECTION 3. 
ESTABLISHMENT OF ZONING DISTRICTS by adding to paragraph 3.1 the 
following: 

" and three overlay districts as follows 
Watershed Protection District WP 
Flood Plain District FP 

Aquifer Protection District AQ" 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw 
Section 2. DEFINITIONS by adding the following: 

"2.1.63A Sign, Temporary 

A sign which advertises a special event, sale or 
service." or do or act anything in relation thereto. 
(Planning Board) 4/29/91 

VOTE Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw Section 2. 
DEFINITIONS by adding the following: 

"2.1.63A Sign. Temporary 

A sign which advertises a special event, sale or 
service." 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw 
SECTION 13. SIGN BYLAW by deleting 13.3.1 as it now reads and by 
substituting the following: 

13.3.1 Off-premise signs are prohibited, except temporary signs used to 
advertise special events whose proceeds are used for charity, schools 
or nonprofit organizations, provided an approved sign permit is 
obtained at least three (3) days before the posting of the sign. There 
shall be no fee for the permit and the Building Inspector is authorized 
to issue the permit without the Sign Advisory Board's approval." 

and by eliminating 13.3.4 a it presently reads and substituting 
therefor the following: 



179 



"13.3.4 Signs near traffic signals or intersection shall not obscure 
visibility or create confusion when viewed from a vehicle stopped at or 
approaching the signal or intersection." 

and by striking the word "(Sign Permit not required)" from 13.5 
TEMPORARY SIGNS 

and by striking paragraphs 13.5.1 through 13.5.5 as they presently 
appear and by substituting therefor the following paragraphs: 

"13.5.1 Temporary window signs are allowed without permit in Business 
Districts for no more than 30 days for advertising special sales or 
events. They may cover no more than one- third of the area of the 
window in which they appear. Their area is not included in calculating 
allowable permanent sign area. 

13.5.2 Temporary outdoor signs may be allowed by permit in Business 
Districts for no more than 30 days advertising special sales or events. 
Their area is not included in calculating allowable permanent sign 
area, but the area of such a sign shall not exceed six square feet per 
s i de . 

13.5.3 Temporary signs are allowed without permit in Residential and 
Business Districts, including but not limited to real estate signs, 
contractor and subcontractor and temporary services, limited to one 
unlighted sign of up to eight (8) square feet pertaining to the sale, 
rental or lease of the premises, or to the services being performed on 
the premises on which the sign is placed. Such signs shall be removed 
within fourteen (14) days after final sale, lease or rental, or 
cessation of services on the premises; 

13.5.4 Real Estate signs are allowed without permit in 
Industrial -Extensive Districts limited to one unlighted sign of up to 
twenty-five (25) square feet pertaining to the sale, rental or lease of 
the premises on which the sign is placed. Such signs and their 
supports shall be removed by the Realtor within 14 days after final 
sale, rental or lease.: 

and by striking 13.10 ALTERATION. REPAIR AND REPLACEMENT OF ON PREMISE 
SIGNS and adding a new Section 13.10 as follows: 

13.10 ALTERATION. REPAIR, AND REPLACEMENT OF SIGNS 

"No signs shall be reconstructed, extended, changed structurally or in 
content or repaired except in accordance with this Bylaw other than 
copy changes on signs with changeable letter channels. A sign which 
does not conform with this bylaw may be repaired provided that the cost 
of repair does not exceed 50% of the replacement cost of the entire 
sign, except that an electric time and temperature sign which is an 
integral part of a nonconforming sign may be repaired or replaced with 
no restrictions on the cost of the repair or replacement, providing the 
replacement is not more nonconforming than the existing sign. A 
nonconforming sign which is deemed unsafe by the Building Inspector 
shall be removed by its owner. 

"If a sign is changed in any fashion a new permit is required following 
the requirements of Section 13. Sign Bylaw of the Town of Medfield 
Zoning Bylaw." 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 4/29/91 



180 



VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw SECTION 13. 
SIGN BYLAW by deleting 13.3.1 as it now reads and by substituting 
the language as set out in the warrant and by eliminating 13.3.4 
as it presently reads and substituting the therefor the language 
as set out in the warrant and by striking the wording "(Sign 
Permit not required)" from 13.5 TEMPORARY SIGNS 

13.10 ALTERATION. REPAIR. AND REPLACEMENT OF SIGNS 

No sign shall be reconstructed, extended, changed structurally, 
repaired or replaced except in accordance with this Bylaw, and 
then only if a new permit is issued following the requirements of 
Section 13 of the Zoning Bylaw. A sign which is deemed unsafe by 
the Building Inspector shall be removed by its owner. 

A sign which does not conform with this Section 13 may be repaired 
provided that the cost of repair does not exceed 50% of the 
replacement cost of the entire sign, provided that such sign as 
repaired is not more nonconforming than the existing sign. 
Notwithstanding the foregoing, an electric time and temperature 
sign which is an integral part of a nonconforming sign may be 
repaired or replaced is not more nonconforming than the existing 
sign. A nonconforming sign may not be maintained if the use of 
the property is changed. 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to delete the language of 
ARTICLE IV. POLICE REGULATIONS, SECTION 11, and substitute the 
following: 

"No person shall fire or discharge any gun, fowling piece of other 
firearm in the Town of Medfield; but to the extent not otherwise 
prohibited by law, the provisions of this section shall not apply to 
(A) the discharge of shotguns or air-guns, or (B) the discharge of 
firearms 

1. in the lawful defense of the person, or 

2. for the humane dispatch of injured animals, or 

3. by any person lawfully on a target, trap or skeet range 
established for such purposes, or 

4. by any duly authorized peace officer acting in the proper 
performance of duty, or 

5. by any duly authorized military personnel participating in 
scheduled military exercises, or 

6. by any person using blank cartridges in theatrical performances or 
sporting events, or 

7. by an owner or tenant of land (or if authorized by either, any 
member of the immediate family or person permanently employed by 
such owner or tenant) but only upon such land and for the limited 
purposes of 

A) shooting a bird or other animal found to be damaging or 
posing the imminent threat of damage to the property of such 
person or persons, and 
b) shooting domestic animals raised as livestock. 



181 



"There shall be a penalty for breach hereof not exceeding $300. for 

each offense." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 4/29/91 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this Article. 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to delete the language of 
ARTICLE IV. POLICE REGULATIONS, SECTION 11. and substitute the 
f o 1 1 ow i ng : 

"No person shall fire or discharge or shoot any bow and arrow gun, 
fowling piece or other firearm in the Town of Medfield; but to the 
extent not otherwise prohibited by law, the provisions of this section 
shall not apply to the discharge of firearms: 

1. in the lawful defense of the person, or 

2. for the humane dispatch of injured animals, or 

3. by any person lawfully on a target, trap or skeet range 
established for such purposes, or 

4. by any duly authorized peace officer acting in the proper 
performance of duty, or 

5. by any duly authorized military personnel participating in 
scheduled military exercises, or 

6. by any person using blank cartridges in theatrical performances or 
sporting events, or 

7. by an owner or tenant of land (or if authorized by either, any 
member of the immediate family or person permanently employed by 
such owner or tenant) but only upon such land and for the limited 
purposes of 

a) shooting a bird or other animal found to be damaging or 
posing the imminent threat of damage to the property of such 
person or persons, and 

b) shooting domestic animals raised as livestock. 

There shall be a penalty for breach hereof not exceeding $300. for each 
offense." or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 4/29/91 

VOTE: Voted to delete the language of ARTICLE IV. POLICE 
REGULATIONS, SECTION 11 AND SUBSTITUTE THE LANGUAGE AS SET OUT IN 
THE WARRANT. 

YES 398 NO 254 BLANKS 2 



ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Bylaws, ARTICLE 
IV. POLICE REGULATIONS, SECTION 11 by adding the following second 
paragraph: 



82 



"No person shall discharge any firearms in the Town of Medfield without 
a permit for discharging firearms from the Medfield Police Chief or his 
designee. 

1. The permit for discharging firearms within the Town of 
Medfield must be renewed annually for a period ending 
December 31 each year. 

2. Fees, as set by the Board of Selectmen, shall be charged for 
the permit. 

3. Along with the permit, the Town shall issue a sticker or 
decal to be affixed to the motor vehicle that the permittee 
will use to drive to public land to discharge firearms. 

4. Each person discharging a firearm in Medfield shall display 
his Town permit. 

5. If any permittee violates any Town bylaw or regulation on the 
discharge of firearms, his permit shall be suspended for the 
remainder of the year of his permit and the following year. 

6. Violators of any Town bylaws or regulations on the discharge 
of firearms shall be subject to the maximum allowable 
penalty, including being required to surrender the firearm 
and, upon conviction, to forfeit it. 

7. Town officials shall enforce strictly all Town bylaws and 
regulations on discharging firearms. 

8. The Town shall post on certain roads, including but not 
limited to Route 27 at the Sherborn and Walpole borders, 
Route 109 at the Dover and Mi 1 1 is borders, Pine Street and 
North Street at the Dover border, South Street, Causeway 
Street, Orchard Street, Noon Hill Road, and such other roads 
as designated by the Board of Selectmen. Signs stating, 

■NO SHOOTING WITHOUT PERMIT 

$500 FINE 

INQUIRE AT POLICE STATION 1 

9. No permit shall be required from the Town of Medfield to hunt 
on property owned or managed by the Division of Fisheries and 
Wildlife or Department of Environmental Management or their 
successors. 

10. Penalty for violation of any provision of this section shall 
be $500. for each offense. 

11. The invalidity, unconstitutionality or illegality of any 
section of this Bylaw shall not have any effect upon the 
validity, constitutionality or legality of any other 
section." 

and to see what sum the Town will appropriate for the purchase and 
installation of signs and/or the issuance of permits as required by the 
provisions of this bylaw, determine in what manner the funds shall be 
raised, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen & Committee to Study Hunting) 4/29/91 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this ARTICLE 52. 



183 



ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of 
Medfield's Zoning Map to change the following described property off of 
West Mill Street, from Residential Town (RI) to Industrial Extensive 
(IE), pertaining to Lot 047, Map 56 of the Medfield's Assessor's Map, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto: 

LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF LOT R-1 RESIDENTIAL AREA 

Beginning at land of George (sic) H ink ley and Neal R. Olson (sic) and 
Virginia F. Olson (sic) running South 52 8' 47" East 533.34 feet by land 
of Neal Olson (sic) Then turning and running South 39 1 1 • 20" East 
197.94 feet by land of Olson, (sic) Peter D. Vroom, and Penn Central 
Rai I road 

Then turning and running Southwesterly on a curved line a radius of 
1230.71 feet 383.18 by land of Penn Central Railroad to the industrial 
and residential zoning line 

Then turning and running North 48 36'37" West 818.66 feet by industrial 
property and buffer strip to land of George Hinkley 

Then turning and running North 71 43'49" East 422.44 feet by land of 
George Hinkley to point of beginning containing 6.83 acres. 

(Petition) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this ARTICLE 53. 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will appoint an independent committee 
of five (5) people to study the feasibility for regional izat ion of the 
Medfield schools. This group would report back as soon as possible and 
no later than the 1992 Town Meeting with their results. The committee 
will be appointed by the Town Moderator. 

(Petition) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted to authorize and direct the Moderator to appoint 
an independent committee of five (5) members to study the 
feasibility for regional izat ion of the Medfield schools and to 
report back to a combined meeting of The Board of Selectmen and 
School Committee on or before January 7, 1992. 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the 
01-001-0806 200 Operations Elections and Registration account the sum 
of $1,550. to the 01-001-0800 100 Personnel account, 

or do or act in anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Clerk) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted to transfer from the 01-001-0806 200 Operations 
Elections and Registration Account the sum of $1,550. to the 
01-001-0800 100 Personnel Account. 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Assessors to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the 
reduction of the Tax Rate for Fiscal 1992, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 4/30/91 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Board of Assessors to use 
$130,000. from Free Cash in the Treasury for the 
reduction of the Tax Rate for Fiscal Year 1992. 



184 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven 
days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make due return of this Warrant with your doings 

thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting, 

aforesaid. Given under our hands this fifth day of March in the year 
of our Lord One Thousand Nine Hundred and Ninety-one. 

Harold F. Pritoni, Jr., Chairman 
Ann B. Thompson, Clerk 
John F. Ganley 

SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants 
of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the 
time and for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of the same 
at five public places seven days before the date of the meeting, as 
within directed. 



Ronald E. Kerr 
Constable of Medfield 



March 14, 1991 



185 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

September 30, 1991 

Norfolk, ss 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, 
greet ings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in Town affairs, to 
meet at the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School auditorium on Monday, the 30th 
of September, A.D., 1991, commencing at 7:30 P.M. o'clock, then and there to 
act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will reject the provisions of Section 231 of 
Chapter 138 of the Acts of 1991, and the fifth sentence of General Laws c. 
71, section 40 as amended by Section 231 of Chapter 138 of the Acts of 1991, 
and thus maintain in fiscal year 1992 the current allocation between fiscal 
years of expenditures of teachers' salaries as provided for currently in the 
General Laws, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 
(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: VOTED to reject the provisions of Section 231 of Chapter 138 of the 
Acts of 1991, and the fifth sentence of General Laws c. 71, section 40 as 
amended by Section 231 of Chapter 138 of the Acts of 1991, and thus maintain 
in fiscal year 1992 the current allocation between fiscal years of 
expenditures of teachers' salaries as provided for currently in the General 
Laws. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum or sums of money 
from unexpended appropriation balances of prior years warrant articles to 
offset the fiscal 1992 tax rate, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 
(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: VOTED to transfer $35,000. from the unexpended balance of Article 15 
of the 1989 Annual Town Meeting, Dale Street Door Replacement and Memorial 
School Door Replacement to offset the fiscal 1992 tax rate. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to reduce the appropriations voted 
under Article 22 of the 1991 Annual Town Meeting for the operating expenses 
of the Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1991, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: VOTED to reduce the appropriation to the 155-00 Insurance 200 
Operations account by $55,000. and to reduce the appropriation to the 150-02 
Town Debt- Interest 400 Other Charges by $20,000. 



186 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $17,567. 
to the 111-02 Police Operations, 100 Personnel Account, and for this purpose 
transfer $17,567. from the Off Duty Work Detail Fee Revenues authorized under 
the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53C of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: VOTED to appropriate the sum of $17,567. to the 111-02 Police 
Operations 100 Personnel Account,, and for this purpose transffer $17,567. 
from the Off Duty Work Detail Fee Revenues authorized under the provisions of 
Chapter 44, Section 53c of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, fourteen 
days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make due return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting, aforesaid. 
Given under our hands this 10th day of September in the year of our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and Ninety- one. 

Ann B. Thompson, Chairman 

John F. Ganley, Clerk 

Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for 
the purpose named, by posting attested copies of the same at five public 
places fourteen days before the date of the meeting, as within directed. 



Constable 



Date 



A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



187 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1991 



188 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

COMPARATIVE FINANCIAL REPORT 

1990, 1991, 1992 



199C 


I 












Class 


Parcel Count 


Valuat 


ion 


1) 


Residential 


3333 


$ 763,308,800, 


.00 


2) 


Open Space 


213 


10,239, 


r 550, 


.00 


3) 


Commercial 


183 


36, 222 , 


r 650, 


.00 


4) 


Industrial 


51 


25,482, 


,600, 


.00 


5) 


Personal Property 


162 


7,129, 


r 040, 


.00 


Total Real and Personal 


3942 


842,667, 


,140, 


.00 


Tax 


Levy 




9,395, 


,738. 


.61 


Over 


lay 




89, 


,567.61 


Tax 


Rate per thousand all classes 






11. 


.15 



1991 



1) Residential 


3469 


2) Open Space 


205 


3) Commercial 


154 


4) Industrial 


50 


5) Personal Property 


160 


Total Real and Personal 


4038 


Tax Levy 




Overlay 




Tax Rate per thousand all classes 





781,815,650.00 

7,578,100.00 

39,364,750.00 

25,506,000.00 

7,112,040.00 

861,376,540.00 

10,412,292.46 

92,809.46 

12.08 



1992 

1) Residential 3506 701,347,777.00 

2) Open Space 190 4,604,350.00 

3) Commercial 148 33,287,750.00 

4) Industrial 50 23,212,000.00 

5) Personal Property 151 7,913,000.00 
Total Real and Personal 4045 770,364,877.00 

Tax Levy 10,908,366.66 

Overlay 125,028.66 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 14.16 



189 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



Taxes Receivable 





Real Estate 


1991 


$225,189.27 


1990 




1989 




Prior Years 


21972.11 


TOTAL 


$247,161.38 



Personal Property 

$2,592.21 

1,752.99 

420.31 

2,696.59 

$7,462.10 



Excise Tax 

$22,335.74 

4,666.42 

11,203.93 

8,506.64 

$46,712.73 



Taxes in Litigation 



$23,214.71 



Water Rates 
Sewer Rates 



184,638.56 
94,139.00 



ADDED TO TAXES: 



Water Service 
Water & Sewer Liens 



1,778.62 
3.475.78 



Apportioned Betterments 
Committed Interest 



129.65 
55.54 



Respectfully submitted, 

Robert G. Stokes 
Tax Collector 



190 



TOWN TREASURER 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Residents of Medfield: 

STATEMENT OF CASH 

Receipts Fiscal 1991 - 

including Investments 18,410,958.71 

Disbursements Fiscal 1991 

including Reinvestments 17,628,705.56 

Cash in Banks June 30, 1991 

including Savings/Money Market Accounts $ 2,268,492.12 

STATEMENT OF INVESTMENTS 

Pooled Investment Fund 

Investments June 30, 1991 1,692,802.86 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments - 

June 30, 1991 $ 3,961,294.98 

STATEMENT OF INTEREST RECEIVED ON SAVINGS /INVESTMENTS 

General Fund 126,710.06 

Pooled Investment Fund 89,238.41 

Total Interest Received Fiscal 1991 $ 215,948.47 

OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 
June 30, 1991 

Net Funded or Fixed Debt Balance June 30, 1991 $ 4,265,000.00 

Outside Debt Limit: 

Aquifer Land Acquisition 800,000.00 

Town Land Acquisition 430,000.00 

Street Sewers and Construction 315,000.00 



$ 1,545,000.00 



nside Debt Limit 



Refuse Transfer Station 350,000.00 

Sewers - Pine Needle Park 2,370,000.00 



$ 2,720,000.00 



191 



TOWN TREASURER 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 



Balance June 30, 1991 

Funds in Custody of Town Treasurer: 

Ret i rement/Pens i on 

Conservation 

Stabi I ization 

Group Health Insurance 

Special Unemployment Insurance 

Library Trusts 

Granville Dai ley-Library 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 

Municipal Insurance 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 

Counci I on Aging 

Palumbo Sports 

Library Income Expendable 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 

Cem Income Account 

Funds in Custody of Selectmen: 

Moses Ellis Post #117 G.A.R. 
Medfield Antiquities Trust 
Tri -Centennial Trust 



$ 2,145,087.90 



1,121,131.01 

30,770.61 

80,903.94 

59,346.48 

96,311.32 

11,657.46 

75,483.19 

14,143.05 

159,188.06 

96,374.77 

2,945.93 

3,732.57 

3,844.60 

332,622.24 

195.12 



9,362.82 
3,615.05 
1,389.67 



2,088,650.35 



Funds in Custody of Schools: 
Essay Fund Account 

Funds in Custody of Library Trustees: 

Madelyn L. Grant 



14,367.54 

2,563.14 

39,506.87 



The foregoing is a record of cash, investments, interest earned, trust 
funds and outstanding debts for fiscal year ended June 30, 1991. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert G. Stokes 

Town Treasurer/Collector 



192 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
BALANCE SHEET 
JUNE 30, 1991 



GENERAL FUND 



DEBIT 



CREDIT 



Cash $3,461,616 

Investment of Available Funds 

Total Cash & Available Funds 



Personal Property 
Current Year 
Prior Years 

Real Estate 
Current Year 
Prior Years 
Prepaid Taxes 

Other Taxes 
Forestry 
Recreation 



Total Taxes 

Provision for Abatements & Exemptions 
Current Year 
Prior Years 

Reserve for Uncollected Taxes 



Tax Liens Receivable 
Reserve for Uncollected Tax Liens 

Taxes in Litigation Receivable 
Reserve for Taxes in Litigation 

Deferred Taxes Receivable 
Reserve for Deferred Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Current Year 
Prior Years 

Reserve for Uncol Motor Excise Tax 
Departmental Receivables: 
Ambulance 
Reserve for Uncol Departmental Rec 

Prepaid Expense 

Apportioned Betterments Added to Tax: 
Water 
Sewer 
Committed Interest 



2,430 
5.032 



$ 211,312 
35,180 
(2,151) 



(152) 
1.367 



$3,461,616 



7,462 



$ 244,341 





253,018 










$ 


(1,581) 
111,028 






$ 


253.018 
362,465 


$ 


192,860 


$ 


192,860 


$ 


23,215 


$ 


23,215 


$ 


8,223 


$ 


8,223 


$ 
$ 


22,336 
24.821 
47,157 


$ 


47,157 


$ 


50,221 


$ 


50,221 


$ 


1,100 






$ 


664 

114 

1.306 







$ 2,084 



193 



Reserve for Betterments Added Tax 



2.084 



Water & Sewer Receivables: 

Water Rates 

Water Services 

Water Liens Added to Taxes 

Total Water Receivables 

Reserve for Water Receivables 



182,231 

453 

6.207 



188,891 



$ 188.891 



Sewer Rates $ 112,204 
Sewer Use - Medfield State Hospital 5,705 
Septic Waste Charges 2,436 
Sewer Installers Permit Fees 

Sewer Liens Added to Taxes 2.724 

Total Sewer Receivables 

Reserve for Sewer Receivables 

Agency Payables: 
Federal Income Tax 
Teachers Retirement Withholding 
Life Insurance Withholdings 
Additional Voluntary Life Ins. Withholding 
Health Insurance Withholdings 
Annuity Withholding Payable 



Warrants Payable 

Tailings (Unclaimed Items) 

Guarantee Deposits 
Treasurer's Tax Title 

Reserved Fund Balances: 

Reserve for Over (Under) Assessments 

Reserve for Under Estimate of Provision 
Reserve for Encumbrances 

Pine Needle Park Sewer Construction 

Aquifer Land Acquisitions 

Special Warrant Articles 

Budget Escrow Accounts 
Reserve for Planned Budget Deficit (f91) 



$ 123,069 



Total Reserved Fund Balances 



Unreserved Fund Balance 

TOTALS - GENERAL FUND 



$ 4,351,454 



$ 123,069 

$ 
5,725 
2,305 
1,699 
3,446 
5.542 

$ 18,717 
$ 604,383 



7,500 

18,484 

(5,246) 
(1,581) 

510,048 

1,378,544 
175,871 
130.000 

$ 2,187,636 

516,549 

$ 4,351,454 



SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 
Cash and Investments 



506,588 



194 



Federal: 
Ambulance 

Total Federal 

State: 

Public Works - Highway up Front 

Chapter 90 - Highway 

Arts Lottery 

Elderly Grants 

Right-to-Know 

Suicide Prevention 

Census Grant 

Library Grants 

DARE 
School: 

Drug Free Schools 

Chapter I ECIA 

Title VIB (94-142) 

Title VIB Early Childhood 

Chapter II ECIA 

School Improvement 

Horace Mann Grant 

TOTAL STATE 

Revolving: 

School Tuition 

School Lunch 

School Council Improvement 

Memorial School Rents 

Middle School Rents 

Wheelock School Rents 

School Custodian Detail 

Adult Education 

School Athletics 

Park & Recreation 

Police Detail 

Total Revolving $ 57,933 



Reserved for Appropriation: 

Perpetual Care $ 16,540 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 40.380 

Total Reserved for Appropriations $ 56,920 

Other Special Revenue: 

Gift Accounts 28,498 

Fine Arts 6,064 

Oxbow Water System Study 4,032 

Theatre Fund 1,116 

Recycling Fund (1) 

Conservation Fee Account 6,095 

Special Investigation Fund 721 

Cable Access 100 

Premium/ Interest Accrued on Loans 10.520 

Total Other Special Revenue $ 57,145 



$ 


508 


$ 


290,126 




5,400 




4,422 




689 




1,094 




1,564 









24,892 




741 









(210) 




510 




2,238 




161 




2,454 




1 


$ 


334,082 


$ 


40,201 




4,136 




606 




(20,126) 









938 




4,359 




( 9,448) 




7,672 




30,704 


$ 


( 1,109) 



TOTALS - SPECIAL REVENUE $ 506,588 $ 506,588 
195 



TRUST FUND 

Cash $ 2,148,542 

In Custody of Treasurer 
Pension $ 1,121,131 

Conservation 30,771 

Stabilization 80,904 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 14,143 

Library Trusts 11,657 

Granville Daily Library 75,483 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 332,622 

Special Unemployment Insurance 96,311 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 96,375 

Council on Aging 2,946 

Palumbo Sports 3,733 

Municipal Insurance 159,188 

Group Health Insurance 59,346 

Library Income Expendable 5,437 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Expendable 3.937 

Total in Custody of Treasurer $ 2,093,984 



In Custody of Board of Selectmen 

Moses Ellis Post G.A.R. 9,363 

Antiquities 3,615 

Tri centennial 1 ,390 

Total in Custody of Selectmen $ 14,368 

In Custody of School Committee 

Essay 2.563 

Total in Custody of School Committee $ 2,563 

In Custody of Library Trustees 

Madelyn L. Grant $ 37,627 



Total Trust Funds $2,148,542 $ 2,148,542 

TOTAL FUND BALANCES $7.006.584 $ 7.006.584 

Respectfully submitted, 
Georgia K. Colivas 
TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



196 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



Total Services 
Added Services 
Thousand Gallons Used 
Thousand Gallons Sold 



3,182 
22 

383,000 
344,000 



WATER REVENUE RECEIVED 



Water Rates 
Water Services 
Water Liens 



$ 461,549 
14,395 
19,178 



Expenses 
Debt Service 



325,212 
261,800 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 



Total Units 

Added Units 

Sewer Use Charge 

State Hospital Sewer Use 



1,095 

65 

189,523 

71,244 



SEWER REVENUE RECEIVED 



Sewer Install Fees 
Septic Waste Disposal Fee 
Sewer Liens 



19,100 
40,021 
31,515 



Expenses 
Debt Service 



2,062,536 
512,389 




Highway Foreman Robert E. Kennedy, Superintendent of Public 
Works Kenneth P. Feeney, and Director of Plant Management 
Austin C. Buchanan overseeing construction of the ballfields 
at the high school. 

197 



CONTRACTS FOR PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



Department/ 

Board Consultant 

Assessors Stanley Bergeron 
96 Hecla St. 
Uxbridge, MA 

Assessors Vinson Rasta 

31 Thornton Rd. 
Chestnut Hill MA 

Assessors Municipal Computer 
Service 



Assessors Carlson Survey Co. 



Purpose 

Real estate appraisal 
consultant 



Personal property appraisal- 
consultant. Updating public 
ut i I i t i es . 



Amount 
$43. /hour 

$30. /parcel 
$1.000. /utility 



Printing tax bills, commitment 
books, master report lists and 
computerized equalization program. 

Correcting and updating 
assessors' maps. 



$15,430. 



$5.00/parcel 
$2.00/ lot 



Health William R. Domey 
1 Brush Hill Rd. 
Sherborn, MA 

Health Walpole Visiting 
Nurse Association 
Walpole, MA 

Planning Whitman & Howard 



School Joseph A. Emerson 
44 Bromfield St. 
Boston, MA 

School Program Analysis 
321 Ray Ave. 
Burlington, MA 



Selectmen Ban" l/Smith,C.P.A. 
10 State St. 
Woburn, MA 

Town Clerk L.H.S. Associates 
Dundee Park 
Andover, MA 



Consultant Sanitary Engineer/ $15,600. 
Agent for the Board of Health. 



Responsible for all Public Health $8,230. 
nursing needs and communicable 
disease followups and statistics. 

Assistance in reviewing subdi- $35. /hr. 
vision plans, site plans and 
other engineering services. 

Legal consultant for School $95. /hr. 

Committee. 



High School, and two $6,460, 

Elementary schools for 
attendance, student schedu- 
ling and grade reporting. 

Fiscal Audit $8,000, 



Street Listing and Voter List $.40/name 
Census by Mai I 



198 



PERPETUAL CARE 



Nancy A. Hosey $ 600. 

Laura E. Howes 300. 

Kenneth L. Isaacs 1,500. 

Tracy H. Mitchell 900. 

Albert J. and Therese J. Menard 1,200. 

Nancy Miele and Ralph Telia 1,200. 

Dorothy Telia and Dr. Ralph Telia 1,200. 

Barbara Berne 1,200. 

Angelo Santucci 3,000. 

Man" lyn Donnelly 300. 

Stuart Wood 300. 

Robert K. and Ruth L. McCarthy 1,500. 

Francis L. Tammaro 1,800. 

Mario J. and Ellen G. Catenacci 350. 

Joseph A. and Mary V. Gil I is 300. 

David L. & Dorcas B. Owen 1,000. 

Gary T. and Joan M. Miner 200. 

Suzanne M. Phillips 600. 

Donald R. and Pauline D. Hayes 1,400. 

Marie K. Roberts 700. 

Robert J. and Shirley A. Larkin 1,800. 

Doris Bergen and Joel Fink 3,000. 

Margaret R. Cruickshank 1,400. 

Mary T. Smith 1,400. 

Grace M. Loerch 350. 

Mabel M. Rogers 1,400. 

Anne M. Sarno 350. 

Genevieve M. Friswell 1,400. 

Sylvia I. Gerber 350. 

Anthony P. Iafolla 1,400. 

Joseph W. and Mary J. Timmerman 1,400. 

Odelia C. Kean 700. 

34,500. 



199 



INDEX 

Page 

Town Officers Elected 7 

APPOINTMENTS BY: 

Board of Selectmen 9 

Assessors 19 

Town Accountant 20 

Town Clerk 20 

Fire Chief 20 

Board of Health 20 

Moderator 20 

Planning Board 21 

Treasurer/Collector 21 

DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Aging, Council on 37 

Ambulance Department 36 

Animal Inspector 38 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 39 

Arts, Council on 40 

Assessors, Board of 42 

Cable T.V. Committee 44 

Cemetery Commissioners 46 

Civil Defense Department 47 

Conservation Commission 48 

Fire Department 34 

Health, Board of 50 

Historical Commission 54 

Historical District Commission 57 

Housing Authority 58 

Inspection Department 59 

Kingsbury Pond Committee 62 

Library Trustees 68 

Medfield Youth Advisory Commission 97 

Memorials, Committee to Study 73 

Memorial Public Library 66 

Memeorial Day Address 71 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 65 

Mosquito Control, Norfolk County 78 

Operation Desert Shield/Storm 77 

Park and Recreation Commission 79 

Planning Board 82 

Police Department 32 

Recycling Committee 87 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 61 

Selectmen, Board of 24 

Streets, Water and Sewer Superintendent 29 

Tree and Insect Pest Control 89 

Tri -County Regional Vocational Technical School 90 

Veterans' Services 98 

Water and Sewerage Board 95 



200 



Page 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

School Committee 100 

Superintendent of Schools 103 

Teachers' Directory 108 

Assistant Superintendent 105 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 117 

Graduation Exercises, High School 120 

Thomas A. Blake Middle School 124 

Dale Street School 126 

Ralph Wheelock School 128 

Memorial School 130 

Report of the Pupil Services Department 132 

Athletic Director 135 

Adult Education Program 134 

Food Service Program 140 

Director of Plant Management 142 



TOWN CLERK'S RECORDS: 

Births 146 

Deaths 149 

Marriages 150 

TOWN MEETINGS AND ELECTIONS: 

Annual Town Election, March 25, 1991 152 

Warrant and Proceedings Annual Town Meeting, March 25, 1991 154 

Warrant and Proceedings Special Town Meeting - September 30, 1991. . . . 186 

FINANCIAL REPORTS: 

Assessors 189 

Collector 190 

Contracts for Professional Services 198 

Perpetual Care 199 

Town Accountant 193 

Treasurer 191 

Water and Sewer Department 197 



201 



NOTES 



202 



NOTES 



203 



NOTES 



204 



NOTES 



205 



NOTES 



206 



NOTES 



207 



NOTES 



208